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Force 10 From Navarone (1978)
Music by Ron Goodwin
Force 10 From Navarone Force 10 From Navarone
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $19.95
Limited #: N/A
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Silver Age
CD Release: February 2006
Catalog #: Vol. 9, No. 4
# of Discs: 1

Force 10 From Navarone (1978) was a long-after-the-fact sequel to the 1961 blockbuster The Guns of Navarone, and an attempt to resurrect the "Boys Own" war adventure genre for the modern-day Star Wars era. The film featured an assortment of internationally known stars—Harrison Ford, Robert Shaw, Carl Weathers, Edward Fox, Richard Kiel and Barbara Bach—in an "impossible mission behind enemy lines" directed by 007 veteran Guy Hamilton.

Scoring Force 10 From Navarone was the man most identified with the British war genre: Ron Goodwin, who had excelled in similar films from the 1960s, such as 633 Squadron, Operation Crossbow, Where Eagles Dare and Submarine X-1 (all released by FSM). The composer was beloved for his ability to capture these stories' sense of stiff-upper-lip patriotism, bare-knuckles action and riveting suspense.

Though he had not scored a war film since 1969's Battle of Britain, Goodwin picked up exactly where he left off and gave Force 10 From Navarone a rousing main title march, colorful action cues, and undulating, nervous textures that heightened each sequence of enemy infiltration and shocking revelation of secret identity.

This premiere release of the soundtrack to Force 10 From Navarone features the complete score in excellent sound quality as mastered from 1/4' stereo tapes in the late composer's personal collection. Liner notes are by Jeff Bond and Lukas Kendall.

Ron Goodwin Scores on FSM
About the Composer

English composer Ron Goodwin (1925-2003) was most active in the 1960s and '70s and beloved for his tuneful war scores for "boys own" adventures—see 633 Squadron, Where Eagles Dare and Force 10 From Navarone. He also wrote charming scores for the Miss Marple mysteries and was successful as a conductor (performing many film music concerts) and recording artist. IMDB

Comments (39):Log in or register to post your own comments
I've been listening to this triumphant Ron Goodwin score a lot over the past week and it's just delightful--as far as war scores can be delightful. Yes, there's a strong childhood connection with that cast, but something's kept me from enjoying the movie. Maybe it's the dreary cinematography or the lousy quality of the DVD, but Goodwin's score on its own is worth repeated listens. The last time I saw the film, which was about six years ago, I was impressed with the cue that plays when the plane takes off towards the start of the movie. I swore that if there was ever a CD release of the score, I'd snap it up. FSM answered the call and I remain pleased with this fantastic presentation.

It makes me want to break my old Navarone play set out of storage:

Wow - I'd have killed for that when I was a kid!

Force 10 isn't half the film that Guns is, but I still enjoyed the uncut version when I first saw it at the pictures - less so the cut version that spared Barbara Bach's, er, blushes.

Great music, more to the point.

Hang on - just noticed the stars and stripes... what's all THAT about??

I suppose it's an American playset.

I wish we'd had 'em here when the film came out, I'd have loved one of those.

I suppose it's an American playset.

I wish we'd had 'em here when the film came out, I'd have loved one of those.[/endquote]

It was originally manufactured by the "Marx" toy company, but the version I have is by "Mego." Still have the box, too. Next time you and The Tall One are in my neck of the woods, I'll let you play with it.

Edit: The Navarone Play Set, I mean.

Looks like Ron Goodwin was the master of the "Military Adventure" film. I should probably get Where Eagles Dare and just endure all those snare drums. ;)

I suppose it's an American playset.

I wish we'd had 'em here when the film came out, I'd have loved one of those.[/endquote]

It was originally manufactured by the "Marx" toy company, but the version I have is by "Mego." Still have the box, too. Next time you and The Tall One are in my neck of the woods, I'll let you play with it.

Edit: The Navarone Play Set, I mean.

Looks like Ron Goodwin was the master of the "Military Adventure" film. I should probably get Where Eagles Dare and just endure all those snare drums. ;)[/endquote]

I see the smiley ... when it comes to those snare drums it's difficult to find anything better! And, for me, Where Eagles Dare is Mr. Goodwin's crowning achievement, though I'm tempted to suggest that the album release is a better listening experience (with the score as a superb alternative). His score to Force 10 From Navarone drifts somewhat for me and I struggle to hold attention throughout ... notwithstanding the main theme being very infectious.

As for the film, I enjoyed it ... and still do (our UK DVD release is pretty good quality). It's a shame they couldn't keep more to the book's storyline but there's nothing new in that complaint. I recall that its release was roughly at the time of Superman and remember thinking that - in the cinema - the dam breaking sequence is just so much better ... it was very effective though loses so much on the small screen.

goodness, Jim, I thought you were THE man....the numero uno Professori of War and 70s Thrillers - but you have Force 10 but not Where Eagles Dare???!!!

Whats going on??

rectify that at once mister - or I'm not coming to your classes any more!!!!


As for the model, that is fantastic.
Wished I'd known - we made our own as kids - the side of the bed was the cliff face and we had 2 railway guns backed up to the edge of the bed with a balsa wood box on top!!

With the curtains shut you couldnt tell the difference between my bedroom and the aegean!!

PS I agree with MusicMad - the MacLean book was terrific, and had they stuck to that plot and side stories, it wouldve made a brilliant film. I remember seeing the film at the cinema and wondering what the hell it was all about.
In time, I enjoyed it for what it is. But the film isnt Guns of Navarone and the score isnt Eagles.

Still good though!!

Hang on - just noticed the stars and stripes... what's all THAT about??[/endquote]

I'm not sure what familiarity you have with the Stars and Stripes, but the flag on that play set AIN'T the Stars and Stripes.

Hang on - just noticed the stars and stripes... what's all THAT about??[/endquote]

I'm not sure what familiarity you have with the Stars and Stripes, but the flag on that play set AIN'T the Stars and Stripes.[/endquote]

Well the flag at the bottom right of the picture sure as hell looks like the Stars and Stripes to me.

It sure isn't the Union Jack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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