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The Undefeated/Hombre (1969/1967)
Music by Hugo Montenegro, David Rose
The Undefeated/Hombre The Undefeated/Hombre The Undefeated/Hombre
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $19.95
Limited #: 3000
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Silver Age
CD Release: September 2000
Catalog #: Vol. 3, No. 6
# of Discs: 1

In the late 1960s, America's most popular and enduring genre went nova. This was, to say the least, a final burst of freaky creativity—good and bad—from a fading genre, bringing revisionism, surrealism, dinosaurs, and even Elvis Presley to the "cowboy" movie. The western was undergoing radical change and experimentation, and we present two never-before-available scores from that period: Both were produced by 20th Century-Fox with top-line casts: John Wayne and Rock Hudson in The Undefeated; Paul Newman and a sturdy ensemble in Hombre.

The Undefeated is a sprawling escapist western involving Civil War factions, Mexican politics, bandits, mustangs and brawls—typical Duke fare, but with updated scope and ambitions. The score, by Hugo Montenegro, is a long, showy score steeped in tradition yet with a pop gleam in its eye; it features reams of deceptively simple yet memorable thematic material. Its terrific main theme could easily be at home in a modern-day NFL broadcast.

In contrast, Hombre is a sober portrait of human interaction and prejudice, re-teaming Newman with a filmmaker of great deliberate craft, director Martin Ritt. David Rose, who scored pop song hits with "The Stripper" and "Holiday for Strings" wrote a short, sparse score that we have collected into longer suite-form tracks; the music presents a meaningful and melodic echo of the story's quiet deliberations.

Together, these scores add up to over an hour of music in stereo. Along with a bonus "mystery track", this CD stands as a tribute to two distinguished, prolific but underrepresented musicians—and a snapshot of their memorable contributions to the western's last days.

Hugo Montenegro Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Hugo Montenegro (1925-1981) was best-known as a recording artist in the 1960s and '70s when his cover versions of themes like Morricone's "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" became more widely heard than the originals. He also saw success as a composer for film (The Ambushers, The Undefeated) and television (I Dream of Jeannie). His lounge and "space pop" recordings are highly regarded in those genres. IMDB

David Rose Scores on FSM
About the Composer

David Rose (1910-1990) was a British-born, Chicago-raised composer, arranger and songwriter active during the 1950s in features at M-G-M (mostly musicals and light fare), and in the 1960s, '70s and '80s largely in television (Bonanza, Little House on the Prairie, Highway to Heaven). He wrote well-known instrumentals "The Stripper" and "Holiday for Strings" and also made several record albums of easy-listening versions of film and TV themes. IMDB

Comments (4):Log in or register to post your own comments
I first saw THE UNDEFEATED in 1992. I had just been in a serious car accident and was wounded from that. I was up late watching TV in my bedroom and caught the beginning of The Undefeated (1969). I was trying to forget my miseries and this movie did the trick. I was immediately swept up by the fact that Duke's Col. John Henry Thomas character was a cult of personality whose men were steadfastly loyal. He only has 10 left of the original 75 men and "two of the them won't make it to Christmas." However, the line I liked best was "They didn't join the army, Joe, they joined me!" Wayne says that to Paul Fix's General Masters character in that small woodframe house in the South. I remember the glass window and the fact that it was pouring outside in the movie. Duke and his surviving troops were going to go out West to round up wild horses to sell to the U.S. Army. ("I sure as Hell ain't givin' 'em to the army!" Duke says to Fix).

Anyway, Montenegro's music was quite good, especially where the Rock Hudson character's loss was concerned like when he must burn his family home down to prevent it from falling into Union hands or worse, the carpetbagger sons of bitches who came down to plunder on the cheap.

It took me awhile to appreciate the rest of the score and for a time I actually regretted buying it! But no more; The Undefeated is a fine western score from a period in the genre's history that witnessed it in its final gasp. 1969 was a great year for Westerns and Hugo Montenegro did a fine job scoring this one.


HOMBRE is another score by a composer I've grown to appreciate, David Rose. His work on Bonanza is legend--at least at my house--and his sensitive, lyrical score for this film is the most memorable part of it, other than Richard Boone's insidious laugh. Richard Boone could kick most actors' asses off the screen so they'd damn well better be ready to deal with it.

Rose used to compose for Banacek too.

I first saw THE UNDEFEATED in 1992. I had just been in a serious car accident and was wounded from that. I was up late watching TV in my bedroom and caught the beginning of The Undefeated (1969). I was trying to forget my miseries and this movie did the trick. I was immediately swept up by the fact that Duke's Col. John Henry Thomas character was a cult of personality whose men were steadfastly loyal. He only has 10 left of the original 75 men and "two of the them won't make it to Christmas." However, the line I liked best was "They didn't join the army, Joe, they joined me!" Wayne says that to Paul Fix's General Masters character in that small woodframe house in the South. I remember the glass window and the fact that it was pouring outside in the movie. Duke and his surviving troops were going to go out West to round up wild horses to sell to the U.S. Army. ("I sure as Hell ain't givin' 'em to the army!" Duke says to Fix).

Anyway, Montenegro's music was quite good, especially where the Rock Hudson character's loss was concerned like when he must burn his family home down to prevent it from falling into Union hands or worse, the carpetbagger sons of bitches who came down to plunder on the cheap.

It took me awhile to appreciate the rest of the score and for a time I actually regretted buying it! But no more; The Undefeated is a fine western score from a period in the genre's history that witnessed it in its final gasp. 1969 was a great year for Westerns and Hugo Montenegro did a fine job scoring this one.


HOMBRE is another score by a composer I've grown to appreciate, David Rose. His work on Bonanza is legend--at least at my house--and his sensitive, lyrical score for this film is the most memorable part of it, other than Richard Boone's insidious laugh. Richard Boone could kick most actors' asses off the screen so they'd damn well better be ready to deal with it.[/endquote]

I love The Undefeated score. I have no doubts that an Hombre named A. Copland spins around in his grave every time we mention it without mentioning his contribution. Uncredited of course.

Although I detested Hugo Montenegro when I was a kid for trashing the Man From Uncle music on his two 'soundtrack' albums, he did do fine scores for THE UNDEFEATED as well as HURRY SUNDOWN(where's the cd for this one RCA?)

Track List
Instruments/Musicians
Click on each musician name for more credits
For more specific musician lists for the scores on this album, go here:
Hombre
The Undefeated

Leader (Conductor):
Hugo Montenegro, David Rose

Violin:
George Berres, Harry Bluestone, Henry Arthur Brown, Bobby Bruce (aka Robt. Berg), Joachim Chassman, George Devron, Harold Dicterow, Kurt Dieterle, Adolph DiTullio, Bonnie J. Douglas (Shure), David Frisina, Janice Gower, Anatol Kaminsky, Irving Bane Katz, Louis Kaufman, Varujan Kojian, Paul Lowenkron, Lewis Main, Jr., Irma W. Neumann, Joseph Quadri, Lou Raderman, Aaron B. Rosenzweig, Ralph Schaeffer, Norman Serkin, Luisa Sheldon, Paul C. Shure, Felix Slatkin, Marshall Sosson, Heimann Weinstine, William Wright

Viola:
Myer Bello, Alvin Dinkin, Alex Neiman, Sven Reher

Cello:
Naoum Benditzky, Joseph Coppin, Douglas L. Davis, Joseph DiTullio, David Filerman, Armand Kaproff, Raphael "Ray" Kramer, Lucien Laporte, Edgar Lustgarten, Kurt Reher, Nino Rosso, Frederick Slatkin (Zlotkin)

Bass:
Meyer (Mike) Rubin, Kenneth Winstead

Flute:
George Drexler, Arthur Hoberman, Luella Howard

Oboe:
William Kosinski, Gordon Pope

Clarinet:
Russell Cheever, Abe Most, William A. Ulyate

Bassoon:
Don Christlieb

French Horn:
John W. "Jack" Cave, Vincent N. DeRosa, William A. Hinshaw, Arthur Maebe, Jr., Harry Schmidt, Henry Sigismonti

Trumpet:
Frank Beach, John Clyman, Robert Fowler, Emanuel "Manny" Klein, Carroll "Cappy" Lewis

Trombone:
James Amlotte, Milton Bernhart, Ray Klein, Edward Kusby, Roy Main, Phillip A. Teele, Lloyd E. Ulyate

Tuba:
Clarence Karella

Piano:
Artie Kane, Urban Thielmann, Terry Trotter

Keyboards:
Paul Beaver

Guitar:
Ralph Grasso, Alton R. "Al" Hendrickson, Allen Reuss, Howard Roberts, Thomas "Tommy" Tedesco

Fender (electric) Bass:
Carol Kaye

Banjo:
Alvin W. Casey

Harp:
Anne Stockton (Mason)

Harmonica:
Tommy Morgan

Accordion:
Jack A. Preisner

Musette:
Jack A. Preisner

Drums:
Ralph Collier, Richard Cornell, James Gordon, Sheldon "Shelly" Manne, Emil Radocchia (Richards), Harold L. "Hal" Rees

Unknown:
Robert Craft

Orchestrator:
David N. Tamkin

Arranger:
Jack J. Hayes, Leo Shuken, Herbert W. Spencer, Nathan Van Cleave

Contractor:
Urban Thielmann

Copyist:
Walter Brenner, Alf H. Clausen, Jack Furlong, Alexander Gerens, Wally Heglin, Albert Lisi, Jack McTaggart, Edward E. Ocnoff, Robert L. Reid, Edgar Roemheld, Jr., Ernest Rosecrans, Glen R. Rosecrans

Librarian:
Fred Combattente

© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.