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In this final part, we will thoroughly analyze the television music of two decades: the Swinging Sixties and the Groovy Seventies.
 
SPECIFICATIONS: THE CRITERIA ARE BASED ON THE FOLLOWING AXIOMS: THE RICHNESS OF THE ORIGINAL RECORDING, THE INTEGRITY OF THE INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, THE LEVEL OF INNOVATION, THE PACE OF THE CORPUS, THE ELEMENT OF SURPRISE, THE COLOR OF THE INSTRUMENTS USE, THE CROSS-REFERENCES.
 
VINTAGE SELECTION PER DECADE
All soundtracks are classified in the alphabetical order of the composers. LN means “Liner Notes” and they include authors dealing with cinema/tv and music analysis, track-by-track commentary, vintage LP notes, technical talk.
 
2. Television Music
 
1960's Soundtracks (6)
Blake
The Avengers—Original Tara King Season Score (Silva Screen) (LN: Jaz Wiseman)
Frontiere
The Rat Patrol (La La Land) (LN: Jon Burlingame)
Hagen
I Spy, Vol. 2—The LP’s (Film Score Monthly) (LN: Jon Burlingame, Lukas Kendall, Bill Cosby)
Herrmann
The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Vol. 1 (Varèse Sarabande) (LN: Robert Townson, Jon Burlingame)
The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Vol. 2 (Varèse Sarabande) (LN: Robert Townson, Jon Burlingame)
Williams
Nightwatch (Film Score Monthly) (LN: Jeff Eldridge, Frank K. DeWald)
 
Notes
The Avengers—Original Tara King Season Score is first a victory because, for the first time, we get a full CD set dedicated to the original recordings of The Avengers. We’re only listening to ten rich, versatile (with shifts of paces), off the wall and whimsical scores by Howard Blake—keep in mind that Johnson also contributes to some scores for this last 60’s season and is credited as music supervisor. The leaning is very jazz-oriented. Disc 1 starts with the new arrangement of The Avengers theme by Laurie Johnson. The most tracked action cue is simply entitled “Action Sequence” culled from “All Done in Mirrors”. Oddly enough, some tracks reminds Jerry Goldsmith’s “Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room”: see “Action Sequence 2” from the score “Super Secret Cypher Snatch”. In the booklet, we learn that composer Bernard Herrmann recommended Blake to Johnson and it showed in the dreamlike track “Optical Illusion” from “All Done With Mirrors” and that the score “Wish You Were Here” is a nod to the series The Prisoner. One score is inspired by Spaguetti western music: “Noon Doomsday” whose parodic concept was already used in The Prisoner: see the 1967 score “Living in Harmony”. Disc 2 starts with the best score of all: “Wish You Were Here”, a hymn to bassoon. For the record, the author of the minimalistic liner notes (i.e., two pages) is also in charge of the audio commentary supervision of the series on DVD. We’re blessed with the list of musicians on page 10. Highly recommended!
We’ve had to wait for three years—The Outer Limits (1963) was out in 2008—to get another Frontiere from that label. The Rat Patrol (1966) is known to feature both stock music and music cues derived and rearranged from dramatist Leslie Stevens’ Stoney Burke (1962). The music has the lost spirit of Daystar Productions in them: one cue from the track “Lost and Found”, the complete “Burning Sun” and one cue of “The Massacre” are reworks from Stoney Burke that used to be injected in “O.B.I.T.” (see the Cypress Hills ominous mood, the first part of the old Dr. Fletcher courtroom scene and the last part of Dr. Scott rest home scene); the track “Desert Sun” is again a rearranged cue from Stoney Burke. These Daystar-esque tracks contrast sharply with the rest because of their poetic and melancolic textures. As for Frontiere’s A Name for Evil (La La Land, 2006), the score is performed by the Graunke Symphony Orchestra. Part of the martial structure comes from one Stoney Burke episode entitled “Point of Honor” which is tracked in The Outer Limits episode: “The Zanti Misfits”. In the pilot of The Rat Patrol (“The Chase of Fire Raid”) and in other episodes (“The Life Against Death Raid”, “Kill or Be Killed Raid”, “The Chain of Death Raid”, “The Do or Die Raid”, “The Blow Sky High Raid” and else), you can even hear the threatening “Soames’ Theme” from “Point of Honor”. In the eighth episode entitled “The Fatal Chase Raid”, you can hear two Outer Limits cues: one (“Phone Call”) from “The Human Factor” and one (“Washington D.C.”) from “The Hundred Days of the Dragon”. “The Last Harbor Raid, Part II” features again a potpourri of Stoney Burke cues: among them, the bass guitar cue from the prologue of “Point of Entry” which will popup in subsequent episodes from season 1 to season 2. Oddly enough, the track “Breaking In and Searching” is written in the ominous vein of Bernard Herrmann’s The Wrong Man (1956).
 
“All right! Shake it!”
—Sgt. Sam Troy (Christopher George) to his Rats in The Rat Patrol.
 
For the anecdote, each episode title ends up with Raid which reminds a trend starts with The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and its Affair titles. According to series historian Bill Anchors (editor of “Epi-Log Journal”), this series was American soldiers’ favourite one during the Vietnam war. Burlingame’s notes are, as usual, interesting: we first learn that Alex North was the first choice to score the pilot and “whose music was scrapped” and that the series had no original scores but a library of cues that lasted 90 minutes; this release has a timing of 78 minutes, by the way. The Rat Patrol follows the same musical procedure as The Fugitive by using stock music to fill up the gaps but Burlingame fails to mention it. Fugitive-wise, the tracks “Lost and Found” and “A Friend's Death” are recycled in the last bunch episodes from season 4: just take a look at “The Judgment, Part 1 & 2”. Two recurring cues are missing or perhaps belong to an alternate library: The Jerry Theme—that is tracked when a German column is crossing the desert and is spotted by Sgt. Troy—and The Rat’s Triumphant End Theme before the end titles—that is tracked when the four soldiers leave by jeep the scene of the action. All and all, this CD release is a must have for the diehard Frontiere purists. As a reminder, listeners can browse the “selected” filmography of the composer in the inlay which gives clues for the following release: let’s hope it’s going to be Stoney Burke (1962) which is the key piece of a large-scale jigsaw puzzle. There’s a television title that is absent and has its importance in the history of television: The New Breed (1961) aka producer Quinn Martin’s first series which allows Frontiere an alternate partnership. So let’s move out and return in 2014 for the next Frontiere!
I Spy, Vol. 2—The LP’s is a reissue of two Sixties LP’s that I bought as a memento like last year’s Hawaii Five-O. As a completist, I was eager to discover these two albums but, but, in the back of my mind, I was expecting a collection of original recordings from season 3 as Robert Drasnin’s “The Seventh Captain” and Earle Hagen’s masterpiece entitled “Home to Judgment”. I find the rendition of these re-recordings less edgy and nervous than the original ones, they sound “live” like in a concert hall and executed a la Hugo Montenegro’s The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and, in the end, it is very soppy and cute and much too adultared. You have realized that those 60’s television re-recordings were all conceived the same way as a gentle mainstream formula. Anyway, in the desert of vintage television soundtracks, it’s good to have this little oasis of music.
Bernard Herrmann’s music for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour is one of my television holy grails along with Jerry Goldsmith’s scores for Thriller. And The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Vol. 1 is a must have for all true blue Herrmann aficionados. It’s all good. There’s no fat. One flaw: the artwork is terrible and cheap. Despite the wealth of noise, each disc has something rich to offer from dreamlike atmosphere to torn-inside romantism. Disc 1 has a superb score entitled “A Home Away from Home” that is a mixture between Fahrenheit 451 (see the hectic “Crushing Glass” at 01:54 from “Suite 1”) and “The Lonely” from The Twilight Zone due to the vibraphone and harp use, the bucolic clarinet-oriented “Nothing Ever Happens in Linvale” and the fast-paced hunting motif that starts each suite from “Behind the Locked Door”. Disc 2 is a shift of mood because the music tends to soften and explores melancoly except the vigorous “Water’s Edge” and there’s even a folkish score “The McGregor Affair”.
The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Vol. 2 is a dream come true and because of the general feature film quality of the music. Disc 1 is very atmospheric and the best score remains: “Consider Her Ways” which is derived from the subdued side of “The Eye of the Beholder” (a season 3 score from The Twilight Zone) due to its peculiar blend of harp and vibraphone. Disc 2 is very energetic and my like goes to “An Unlocked Window” because of its heavy trombones-oriented direction but it’s hard to select among these fine scores. Disc 3 is the best of the three because you find a series of superior scores: the slow-moving “Terror at Northfield” features a frenzied cue from 00:24 to 00:37 inside Suite 3, the oddball and ethereal “The Jar” is built around a barrel organ for circus that is heard in the background, “The Life Work of Juan Diaz” is based on a habanera that reminds Vertigo. Herrmann was the master of the delicate dreamlike art and the way he orchestrated the harp was an invitation to heaven. With that Volume 2, Herrman reached the level of total poetry and overtook his own Twilight Zone!
Nightwatch is a serious 1960’s score by Johnny Williams that is timpani-oriented. Sometimes, on a superficial level, the low-key suspense cues remind Goldsmith’s “The Vulcan Affair” from The Man from U.N.C.L.E. The score keeps on injecting the energetic main theme inside gloomy tracks except in a couple as the string-oriented “Granstrom’s Headache”. Williams’ orchestrations are dense and versatile despite the limitations. Note that four tracks are conducted by Morton Stevens and you can hear the difference: see “Nightwatch Main Title”, “Nightwatch End Title”, “Bumper #1/Bumper #2”, “Promo”.
 
 
1970's Soundtracks (2)
Jones
Killer by Night (Film Score Monthly) (LN: Jeff Eldridge, Frank K. DeWald)
Rosenthal
21 Hours at Munich (Intrada) (LN: John Takis, Douglass Fake)
 
Notes
Killer by Night is the second score of Quincy Jones released by the label after The Split. It’s hip, complexe, ominous—which integrates a macabre element a la Billy Goldenberg’s NBC Mystery Movies in “Point One”, “Something Def”, “Oxygen Tent, “No Title”, “4th Cut to Hood”, “Microscope”—and gritty television music with a jazz (see the solo saxophone use that reminds The Split) and country (distorted harmonica prefiguring The Getaway) writing at once and few experimental and psychedelic arrangements including reverberation and echo—see the off-centered pitch bending vibrating percussion gimmick that will be reworked for a score of Planet of the Apes: The Series entitled “The Trap”, composed by Richard Lasalle. A short passage (from 01:20 to 01:34) of the track “Police” is a nod to the theme of Ironside. Some “dissonant” and “pointillistic”—Eldridge and DeWald use those particular words—harpsichord fragments will be back as the basis of Dave Grusin’s 1973 Neo-Noir film score The Friends of Eddie Coyle: see “Dead Dip Bird” (cue from 00:37 to 00:45, cue from 00:57 to 01:05, cue from 01:13 to 01:23), “Something Def” (cue from 00:32 to 00:42), “4th Cut to Hood/Wait” (cue from 00:42 to 00:53), “Cut to Cops” (cue from 00:13 to 00:20 and 01:01 to 01:21), “End Title” (cue from 00:33 to 00:40, cue from 00:49 to 01:00, cue from 01:16 to 01:29). This score is "almost" the perfect supplement to Jerry Goldsmith’s Crosscurrent because of its obsessive dreambeats and it is part of a double header that I recommend more than warmly. It’s the flip side of the lean Nightwatch in terms of bent. Composer Morton Stevens is credited as Music Supervision, by the way.
21 Hours at Munich is a tension-filled (see the dry guitar motif combined with percussions) and national-flavored score that blends two folklores: German and Middle East. It’s the ideal companion piece to Roy Budd’s Diamonds in terms of Mediterranean Sea folklore. The fast-paced martial track “Schreiber” has the arrangements of the composer’s Seventies trade mark: see the Sandmen theme from Logan’s Run: The Series. I enjoy the extra track simply entitled “Disco Source” but doesn’t sound disco at all but rather jazz-funk.
 
 

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Love the samples for that Quincy Jones score will be picking that gem up with my next order from SAE my main interest is in Italian scores so I've had to skip many other titles that I'd certainly have picked up before.

Again I find that your selections are high amongst titles that are of interest to me thanks for taking the time to share your opinions.

Missed out on the Bernard Herrmann At 20th Century Fox set it had sold out while I've been working away from home they clearly never made enough to meet demand had a chance to buy it at over double the price or whatever it was from their European outlet.

Many of these scores should never go out of print it is nice to discover music in your own time and at a pace that suits, strange times we live in worldwide recession for most of us and more scores than ever getting released in an ever decreasing amount of copies pressed. Still we have more choice :) listening to the samples as I type for the two Alfred Hitchcock sets and reading over you reviews has given me the nudge that I needed to delay no further in ordering those two sets.

After working away from home for the last five months and for the best part of twelve hours a day logging onto a PC in the evenings has been far from my mind or getting up to speed with everything whilst I've been home over the weekends.

Never even noticed The Avengers cd getting released wish there was some samples for that one somewhere and I do love Roy Budd's scores for The Stone Killer and Diamonds. Listened to the samples for The Rat Patrol before it is not really the type of war score I enjoy.

Two Italian war scores I enjoy Francesco Rosi's Uomini Contro a serious score devoid of comedy and romanticism Piero Piccioni conjures up this brutal landscape devoid of life which has a sense of impending doom lingering over it like a mist.
Armando Trovajoli's Italiani brava gente has a lot more warmth to it there is a great sense of comradeship an Italian voice is heard over some of the tracks wish I could understand what he was saying but it is not really necessary as the music tells such a vivid story.

Love the samples for that Quincy Jones score will be picking that gem up with my next order from SAE my main interest is in Italian scores so I've had to skip many other titles that I'd certainly have picked up before.

Again I find that your selections are high amongst titles that are of interest to me thanks for taking the time to share your opinions.

Missed out on the Bernard Herrmann At 20th Century Fox set it had sold out while I've been working away from home they clearly never made enough to meet demand had a chance to buy it at over double the price or whatever it was from their European outlet.

Many of these scores should never go out of print it is nice to discover music in your own time and at a pace that suits, strange times we live in worldwide recession for most of us and more scores than ever getting released in an ever decreasing amount of copies pressed. Still we have more choice :) listening to the samples as I type for the two Alfred Hitchcock sets and reading over you reviews has given me the nudge that I needed to delay no further in ordering those two sets.

After working away from home for the last five months and for the best part of twelve hours a day logging onto a PC in the evenings has been far from my mind or getting up to speed with everything whilst I've been home over the weekends.

Never even noticed The Avengers cd getting released wish there was some samples for that one somewhere and I do love Roy Budd's scores for The Stone Killer and Diamonds. Listened to the samples for The Rat Patrol before it is not really the type of war score I enjoy.

Two Italian war scores I enjoy Francesco Rosi's Uomini Contro a serious score devoid of comedy and romanticism Piero Piccioni conjures up this brutal landscape devoid of life which has a sense of impending doom lingering over it like a mist.
Armando Trovajoli's Italiani brava gente has a lot more warmth to it there is a great sense of comradeship an Italian voice is heard over some of the tracks wish I could understand what he was saying but it is not really necessary as the music tells such a vivid story.




2011 was a Herrmann year not to miss.
Music-wise, the two volumes of HITCH are bigger-than-life and have the feature film quality:
tragic, romantic, sentimental, possessed, torn-inside, atmospheric, ethereal, suspenseful.

THE AVENGERS has some Herrmanesque bits—on the dreamlike side—in there despite the fast-paced jazzistic bent.
I advise you buy the DVD set of THE AVENGERS with it to compare and dig it harder.
Find the English edition that I bought which contained audio commentaries and other extras:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Avengers-Series-6-DVD/dp/B002RNOS4W/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1325439870&sr=8-8
I wish they could release the Blu-Ray.

To fully appreciate the music of THE RAT PATROL, you have to go back to the roots of Frontiere:
Daystar Productions (1961-1965), founded by writer Leslie Stevens.
Otherwise you will miss the interest and the essence. You need "that" key.
Frontiere's music was first heavily influenced by 1950's composers as Bernard Herrmann, Alex North and Hugo Friedhofer and Frontiere's Daystar era was all that and more. I mean he adds a subtle touch of Renaissance and Baroque with it.
Anyway, it's up to you and how you feel.

And once again, the vintage television soundtrack of 2011 remains "Killer by Night" (1971)
by jazzman Quincy Jones who leads us to a voyage to the far end of the night.
That score is truly addictive and far better than THE SPLIT due to its uncompromising complexity.
It's songs-free: what a relief.




Never even noticed The Avengers cd getting released wish there was some samples for that one somewhere and I do love Roy Budd's scores for The Stone Killer and Diamonds. Listened to the samples for The Rat Patrol before it is not really the type of war score I enjoy.



I have found out for you a music site that give you clips of Howard Blake's "The Avengers":
http://www.deezer.com/fr/music/howard-blake/the-avengers-1968-1969-1162978
Enjoy the beat!

Many thanks for that link Thomas I enjoyed those samples loved watching the show when I was younger but think it was mostly The New Avengers that fitted my time frame never paid any special attention to music in those days of the TV shows or Films. It was much later sometime after the eighties that I was getting hooked on great music from the 60-70.;)

Think you can only be right about The Rat Patrol have never seen the show John Bender highly recommended it to the members of his Euro score discussion group which mostly only highlights Italian scores and most of the time I've found I enjoy nearly everything he has recommended.

Thought the same thing myself when I listened to the samples for Killer by Night that it seemed better than The Split have ordered it along with the two Herrmann sets from SAE

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