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 Posted:   Sep 26, 2023 - 8:33 AM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)



Thank you once again for a measured, thoughtful and meaningful response.

Always a pleasure to read your comments.
...
Seconded


I appreciate the sentiments, gents. I certainly can sympathize with the feeling many have that this is perhaps distractingly different than what expectations for a film score may be. And, again, usually that is what has been appealing to me lately. Film scoring got remarkably boring in recent years despite many great gems to be heard.

I was already a tried-and-true fan of the Scandinavian musical magician Jóhann Jóhannsson. The day of his passing I was truly gobsmacked having to reconcile that I wouldn't get to hear brand new work from someone I had been entranced by (his record label does a great job keeping his existing work consistently released, at least). Tough day, that one. But one of his closest collaborators and co-conspirators, Miss Guðnadóttir, started to become more prevalent in this field and I felt like there was still a sound that was entrancing me. It isn't a sound that can or should appeal to all ears. And that's fine. I prefer it that way, maybe.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2023 - 11:32 AM   
 By:   rjc   (Member)

Nothing has been stated as to why exactly Doyle wasn't involved, has it?

Most of the conversation has been around his inability to find the scheduling around his work on the King's coronation obligations.


Yeah. I guess I was wondering if anything more definitive had been established by now.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2023 - 5:05 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

I'm stunned. This is a bewildering composer assignment, and I really hope it doesn't mean the Doyle/Branagh collaboration is over.

Yavar


I agree. I too am stunned. Branagh usually has themes and melodies in his scores by Doyle. Can't say I've ever heard a theme from Hildur.


Hildur can write melody. Her score for WOMEN TALKING was melodic and quite lovely. I too disliked the scores for JOKER and CHERNOBYL as stand-alone listening but they were extremely effective for the films (especially CHERNOBYL).
Let's give her a chance. I thought the scores for the first two Poiret films were forgettable, so what can it hurt.
I'm a little biased because I generally love Icelandic composers and music.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2023 - 7:46 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

I thought the scores for the first two Poiret films were forgettable, so what can it hurt.
I'm a little biased because I generally love Icelandic composers and musi.


Same feelings (both sentiments). As much as we all love Doyle, I don't really see anyone bringing out the two prior Poirot scores as some of his best or most memorable works. I also think he could've nailed this score because of his immense talent but, for my own interest, when was the last time he composed something this sparse and enigmatic?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2023 - 7:59 PM   
 By:   jamesluckard   (Member)

Nothing has been stated as to why exactly Doyle wasn't involved, has it?

Most of the conversation has been around his inability to find the scheduling around his work on the King's coronation obligations.


Yep, and that still sounds suspiciously like the standard "scheduling conflicts" excuse used in every film industry press release. The piece he wrote for the coronation is only 4 minutes long. There's almost certainly more to the story.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2023 - 9:21 PM   
 By:   Spinmeister   (Member)

Eh. Gudnadóttir is the stylish, new dress in the window that catches the roving eye looking to impress hoity-toity party guests.

Doyle, meanwhile, is last season's hand-me-down.

Like or not, it happens to the best of us.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2023 - 8:21 AM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

At this point, Doyle is more like vintage 90s fashion you are finding at a used clothes boutique!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2023 - 9:57 AM   
 By:   Prince Damian   (Member)

.
Doyle, meanwhile, is last season's hand-me-down.


He is the old kilt that the dog has dragged through the
heather, on a wet day.smile

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2023 - 4:34 PM   
 By:   Erik Woods   (Member)



Yep, and that still sounds suspiciously like the standard "scheduling conflicts" excuse used in every film industry press release. The piece he wrote for the coronation is only 4 minutes long. There's almost certainly more to the story.


At FMF Krakow, Doyle mentioned that Branagh basically chose another composer. That's all he said.

-Erik-

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2023 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   A Busy Man   (Member)

Interesting discussion on a recurring debate about film scores. I think most would agree that a film score has to serve the film first. There seem to be many ways of doing this, and probably every film could be successfully scored many different ways.

A score can serve its film on several levels, from simple mood setting to musical storytelling to social comment and probably much more.

It can also be musically coherent or incoherent and be a worthwhile listening experience outside the film.

This said, it seems to me that a score that operates on more than one level could be said to be superior to one that operates only as mood music or as ironic comment, for instance.

Thus, while many cinemagoers may be satisfied with scores that drone or have no melody or structure on an emotional or visceral level, more can be expected and has been achieved. So admirers of past--and current--film scores that work on two or three levels and are listenable outside the film are justified in being disappointed that so many 21st century scores, including instrumental ones, do not meet that standard.

It's all the more disappointing when the composers of these scores are capable of so much more.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2023 - 10:23 PM   
 By:   rjc   (Member)



Yep, and that still sounds suspiciously like the standard "scheduling conflicts" excuse used in every film industry press release. The piece he wrote for the coronation is only 4 minutes long. There's almost certainly more to the story.


At FMF Krakow, Doyle mentioned that Branagh basically chose another composer. That's all he said.

-Erik-


Thank you, Erik. Without reading too much into it, the comment provides a bit more than just speculation.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2023 - 11:08 PM   
 By:   Spinmeister   (Member)

By the bye, I quite like Doyle's "Death on the Nile". The film not so much. Ditto "Murder on the Orient Express".

As for "A Haunting in Venice", I'm putting off listening to the soundtrack until I see the film, and that'll have to wait until it hits streaming.

Recommended "Death on the Nile" playlist:

03. The Pyramids
05. The Newly Weds
06. She's Back
07. A Single Bullet
08. Immortal Longings
10. Come with Me
11. Suspects
12. One Last Cork
13. Goodnight Jacks
15. Someone Is Dead
16. Inheritance
18. Let Poirot Work
23. Perhaps
24. The Cost of Love
25. Death on the Nile

Total Time: 37:00

 
 Posted:   Sep 28, 2023 - 12:24 AM   
 By:   rjc   (Member)

https://youtu.be/n8VhQBsEJXQ?si=olEIDoUD1EiR80K5

A link to what Erik referenced, the FMF Krakow. Apologies if its been posted elswhere.

Doyle responds briefly but affably to a query beginning at about 56:20.

And Spinmeister, agreed re: the NILE score; I actually prefer it to ORIENT.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2023 - 7:55 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Watched the film this morning. Gorgeous photography and effects that evokes a wet, autumnal Venice and a brooding, ghostly atmosphere. Plot is typical Agatha Christie but engaging enough.

The film is sparingly scored. This is not wall to wall scoring but in my opinion Hildur Guðnadóttir's score works really well for the film, enhancing the gloomy atmosphere of the film. If you sign Hildur to score your movie than you'll get a
Hildur score. Branagh clearly wanted this soundtrack for his movie and, I suspect is less than interested in the views of soundtrack fans who find the score difficult to engage with, particulary as a standalone listen.

However, there is an excellent cue in the penultimate scene of the film at the canalside, slightly more positive in tone. It may be the 'Money In the Matresss track or maybe unreleased.

 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2023 - 9:43 AM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

Watched the film this morning. Gorgeous photography and effects that evokes a wet, autumnal Venice and a brooding, ghostly atmosphere. Plot is typical Agatha Christie but engaging enough.

The film is sparingly scored. This is not wall to wall scoring but in my opinion Hildur Guðnadóttir's score works really well for the film, enhancing the gloomy atmosphere of the film. If you sign Hildur to score your movie than you'll get a
Hildur score. Branagh clearly wanted this soundtrack for his movie and, I suspect is less than interested in the views of soundtrack fans who find the score difficult to engage with, particulary as a standalone listen.

However, there is an excellent cue in the penultimate scene of the film at the canalside, slightly more positive in tone. It may be the 'Money In the Matresss track or maybe unreleased.


I concur with this assessment, after seeing the movie itself this weekend. The tone and approach of Hildur's score makes so much more sense after seeing the movie, it absolutely helps set a claustrophobic, melancholy and intimate scale required by this adaptation. Of course Doyle has the talent to provide any score that's needed, so who knows why this decision was made, but both me and my girlfriend (who is admittedly a Hildur fan!) agreed that the score for this film is exactly what it needed and it doesn't detract from it in the slightest.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2023 - 10:35 AM   
 By:   erikjheine   (Member)

Watched the film this morning. Gorgeous photography and effects that evokes a wet, autumnal Venice and a brooding, ghostly atmosphere. Plot is typical Agatha Christie but engaging enough.

The film is sparingly scored. This is not wall to wall scoring but in my opinion Hildur Guðnadóttir's score works really well for the film, enhancing the gloomy atmosphere of the film. If you sign Hildur to score your movie than you'll get a
Hildur score. Branagh clearly wanted this soundtrack for his movie and, I suspect is less than interested in the views of soundtrack fans who find the score difficult to engage with, particulary as a standalone listen.

However, there is an excellent cue in the penultimate scene of the film at the canalside, slightly more positive in tone. It may be the 'Money In the Matresss track or maybe unreleased.


That cue is unreleased. Check out my interview with Hildur in the upcoming October issue of FSMO to find out why.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2023 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Interesting reading all this. Still not seen the film yet but Hurdy’s comment about liking it in the film but not neccessarily as a stand alone listening experience…. Isn’t that the point? If it works on its own, great but obviously Brannagh wanted a change in his usual style, not having Doyle onboard and rather than a Doyle like score, we have this total change of pace. Personally i love it as a stand alone listen . . . .

Let me pose a question to anybody who loves the music as a stand-alone listen: Are you listening with full attention, as at a concert, or are you playing the audio in the background while doing something else? I'm not implying a value judgment here; there are many different ways to experience music. But it would be useful to know in what mode a person is operating.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2023 - 2:45 PM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)


However, there is an excellent cue in the penultimate scene of the film at the canalside, slightly more positive in tone. It may be the 'Money In the Matresss track or maybe unreleased.


That cue is unreleased. Check out my interview with Hildur in the upcoming October issue of FSMO to find out why.
-------
Will do...for sure......

 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2023 - 10:04 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)


Let me pose a question to anybody who loves the music as a stand-alone listen: Are you listening with full attention, as at a concert, or are you playing the audio in the background while doing something else? I'm not implying a value judgment here; there are many different ways to experience music. But it would be useful to know in what mode a person is operating.


As someone who is enjoying this as a stand-alone (still haven't seen the film), I have listened to it maybe a dozen times between my headphones and over our stereo system (streaming from Spotify, on WiFi, using their "very high" audio setting which is 320kbps). It's a very brief album so it is quite easy to engage my attention.

It is in my opinion that I don't think anyone would find much in this score if it was put on in the background as a noise to accompany chores or cooking or what have you.

 
 Posted:   Oct 3, 2023 - 2:41 PM   
 By:   spook   (Member)

I couldn’t have put it any better than ‘Nuts’ above.
When i first heard this it was on in the background and i didn't really register it other than to think it was pretty crap! When i listened properly to it another time with headphones it was a complete reverse. I now keep going back to this and loving it more every time. I just find it such an experience to listen to. Interestingly enough though my big classical music fan mate listened to it after me pushing him and said it was sparce, grating and unlistenable!! To each their own big grin

 
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