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 Posted:   Sep 11, 2019 - 3:17 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)


Onya,

It might be of interest to the group that the pianist on all of the tracks was Cy Coleman, of Broadway fame, before he became famous.

He was a classmate of mine at the High School of Music & Art.

SP


Very cool! Will this album ever be reissued?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2019 - 4:38 PM   
 By:   erepel   (Member)

Happy Birthday, Mr. Phillips.

At the time Buck Rogers was on the air, I attempted to write on music paper the lead trumpet part of the TV opening credits (I had to guess at the time signature -- 6/8 time worked for me). I even got some of my band mates to flesh out low brass and percussion. Never did that for anything else. Perhaps that is why it is my most favorite TV theme from that time.

Then, 33 years later, hearing the theme in stereo (multiple versions!) by way of the Intrada set ... WOW!

Thank you, sir!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2019 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   rerunkr   (Member)


Onya,

It might be of interest to the group that the pianist on all of the tracks was Cy Coleman, of Broadway fame, before he became famous.

He was a classmate of mine at the High School of Music & Art.

SP


Very cool! Will this album ever be reissued?


If it hasn't been reissued since 1956, I doubt any chance of it being released now.

I still have a few LPs collecting dust somewhere.

SP

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2019 - 5:14 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)


Onya,

It might be of interest to the group that the pianist on all of the tracks was Cy Coleman, of Broadway fame, before he became famous.

He was a classmate of mine at the High School of Music & Art.

SP


Very cool! Will this album ever be reissued?


If it hasn't been reissued since 1956, I doubt any chance of it being released now.

I still have a few LPs collecting dust somewhere.

SP


Yeah ... outer space ain't what it used to be

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2019 - 6:33 PM   
 By:   Dylan   (Member)

Happy Birthday to a great composer whose work I absolutely adore.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2019 - 6:22 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I would love to hear Stu's thoughts on what it was like for a composer/arranger at the time he was coming up.

It seems that composers/arrangers of Stu's general vintage (and maybe a tad older) had to be very conversant in a number of styles, including "light music," jazz, pop, 20th-century classical.

They had to be quick and versatile. I read a story of Mel Torme riding in a cab to a session with Billy May, and Billy was writing one of the arrangements in the car! Mel turned pale. It was a typical four-song, three-hour session. Billy said, "Don't worry, my copyist will write the parts while we record the other three tunes."

I've also wondered what it was like for composers/arrangers of Stu's vintage to have come up while the melodies of Cole Porter, Richard Rodgers, Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, Duke Ellington, and George Gershwin were all fresh and in the air. Those songs must be a part of their DNA.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2019 - 12:56 PM   
 By:   rerunkr   (Member)

I would love to hear Stu's thoughts on what it was like for a composer/arranger at the time he was coming up.

It seems that composers/arrangers of Stu's general vintage (and maybe a tad older) had to be very conversant in a number of styles, including "light music," jazz, pop, 20th-century classical.

They had to be quick and versatile. I read a story of Mel Torme riding in a cab to a session with Billy May, and Billy was writing one of the arrangements in the car! Mel turned pale. It was a typical four-song, three-hour session. Billy said, "Don't worry, my copyist will write the parts while we record the other three tunes."

I've also wondered what it was like for composers/arrangers of Stu's vintage to have come up while the melodies of Cole Porter, Richard Rodgers, Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, Duke Ellington, and George Gershwin were all fresh and in the air. Those songs must be a part of their DNA.


Onya,

Read my book "Stu Who?". It will answer most of your questions.

 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2019 - 12:57 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

So what does Stu hope for, if anything, on his 90th birthday?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2019 - 4:23 PM   
 By:   rerunkr   (Member)

So what does Stu hope for, if anything, on his 90th birthday?

Stu hopes to return to his 89th birthday.https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/pics/icon12.gif

SP

 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2019 - 4:30 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Happy Birthday Stu -- I think you overlapped with Jerry Goldsmith on a couple of projects. (Was it even as record album producer, perhaps, or am I going batty?) Would you have any interest in sharing your memories of Jerry over a Skype conversation, for The Goldsmith Odyssey?

www.goldsmithodyssey.com

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2019 - 7:24 PM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

Tonight I’ll be listening to Stu’s arrangements for that kid Johnny Williams and the Boston Pops. Great stuff.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2019 - 12:39 PM   
 By:   rerunkr   (Member)

Happy Birthday Stu -- I think you overlapped with Jerry Goldsmith on a couple of projects. (Was it even as record album producer, perhaps, or am I going batty?) Would you have any interest in sharing your memories of Jerry over a Skype conversation, for The Goldsmith Odyssey?

www.goldsmithodyssey.com

Yavar


Yavar,

I had two contacts with J.G. Once at a restaurant, and at a CLG meeting. Jerry was never involved with anything I did in my career.

SP

 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2019 - 12:50 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

My mistake! I had thought it was something back in your record-producing days in the 60s, perhaps. I must've gotten mixed up. If your two interactions with Jerry were at all memorable and you feel inclined to share, my invitation still stands. smile

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2019 - 12:59 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Well, I imagine it was like this.

Stu: "Hum, haven't eaten at Outback Stakehouse in a while..."

LATER IN LINE...

Stu: "Oh my God, Jerry Goldsmith! I love you're work!"
Jerry: "Thanks," tosses his ponytail to the side like a 1980's action hero.
Stu: "You know, Jerry, I'm a composer too!"
Jerry: "Really? Who are you?"
Stu: "Stu Phillips."
Jerry: "Stu who?"


And thus a book title was born.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2019 - 2:01 PM   
 By:   rerunkr   (Member)

My mistake! I had thought it was something back in your record-producing days in the 60s, perhaps. I must've gotten mixed up. If your two interactions with Jerry were at all memorable and you feel inclined to share, my invitation still stands. smile

Yavar


He was friendly at both occasions, and, Yes... he did know who I was. And...no...It wasn't the steakhouse. As you can see, I have nothing memorable to talk about concerning Jerry. Would have loved to have known him better. smile

SP

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2019 - 2:58 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

But you do have a connection to John Williams, although I believe you said earlier that there wasn't much connection when you both worked on GIDGET GOES TO ROME.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2019 - 2:49 PM   
 By:   rerunkr   (Member)

But you do have a connection to John Williams, although I believe you said earlier that there wasn't much connection when you both worked on GIDGET GOES TO ROME.

Thor,

GIDGET GOES TO ROME was when I first met John. We became better friends when I was invited by Lionel Newman to join the music table in the executive dining room at 20th Fox. John's office was in Lionel's office, so John was at lunch when he wasn't otherwise engaged. I was working on Fall Guy & other Larson shows, so I was on the Lot 2 or 3 days a week. If I remember correctly I believe that Herb Spencer was there quite often. It was at one of those lunches when John said that he would like to perform BSG with the Boston Pops. He also said that he was thinking of also doing the Twilight Zone theme, but couldn't find any interesting arrangement. He asked if I would like to take a crack at it. I did...he liked it...he performed it... and then recorded it. I happened to be in New York at the time the concert took place, so I drove up to Boston for the concert and then spent some time with John.

SP







ou

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2019 - 3:17 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Thanks for sharing, Stu. I know that John Williams was the go-to guy in the late 50s and 60s when someone needed "proper" underscore, sometimes arranged around the melody of the songs composed by someone else (his resume is FULL of these assignments, all the way up to the 70s). That was certainly the case with GIDGET, where he uses the "Gegetta" song (which you produced/arranged?) through the film -- James Darren being a surprisignly frequent appearance in those early JW days. I hope Maurizio of the "John Williams Legacy" website gets in touch with you; I think you have may many stories to tell, like the ones you just did.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2019 - 3:42 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Oh, and here's a great (albeit dark) picture of our 2012 meet. Conductor William Stromberg on the right:

 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2019 - 5:44 PM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

Absolutely happy (belated, I am ever so sorry) birthday!

Sheesh, come on over and party with us!

I celebrate by doing something kinda funky like chicken’s with scorpions having sex at last... before I dash to the elevator. Cosmic forces, what can I say? What an ending.




(I just love these cue titles.)

 
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