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 Posted:   Dec 16, 2006 - 8:54 AM   
 By:   Rexor   (Member)

. I just wish the CD had as crystal clear sound (and performance) as did the old MGM LP.

I was listening to the lp recently and the sound wasn't that good or clear.


- Rex

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2006 - 1:19 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

...the ...Overture ... on the Rhino disc is actually a cut-down version. The full piece runs about six-and-a-half minutes (I have a mono tape of it somewhere).

I've never heard the complete version. Can you describe how it differs from the Rhino release? Are the "Shenandoah" and "Endless Prairie" segments extended?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2007 - 2:05 PM   
 By:   estgrey   (Member)

I have the Rhino 2-CD set, but not the Sony. The Sony CD is obviously less complete, but how does it compare otherwise? Does it also have the overlap error mentioned by Joe Caps?

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2007 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

The Sony CD issue was in that DREADFUL series of poorly produced CDs in which music from the LP releases was nearly always combined with music recorded OFF the film tracks...with dialogue, etc.

It was an ABYSMAL series of recordings.



 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2007 - 10:36 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Does it also have the overlap error mentioned by Joe Caps?

No, since the Overture was taken directly from the film print.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 14, 2007 - 3:33 AM   
 By:   Roy212   (Member)

I feel that the Sony issue compliments the Rhino issue, almost like a CD3 of the set. The Sony issue has the narration spoken by Spencer Tracy, which guides and explains in so many words, what the instrumental tracks are all about.

I vividly remember seeing the movie on the wide Cinerama screen and is still one of my favorite western movies. The narration is a big part of the memory.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 14, 2007 - 9:35 PM   
 By:   estgrey   (Member)

The Sony CD issue was in that DREADFUL series of poorly produced CDs in which music from the LP releases was nearly always combined with music recorded OFF the film tracks...with dialogue, etc.

Then perhaps it is just as well that no copies appear to be available for purchase, even in the used or second-hand market. (It may also be that the Rhino set reduces interest overall, both for buyers and sellers.) Since I do not own a copy myself, I shall try to borrow one for a listen. I think I know someone who had it when it first came out.

For those who have it, how is the DVD?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 14, 2007 - 10:08 PM   
 By:   The_Mark_of_Score-O   (Member)

I've never heard the complete version [of the overture]. Can you describe how it differs from the Rhino release? Are the "Shenandoah" and "Endless Prairie" segments extended?

Are you actually going to make me drag out the tape and listen to it?

 
 Posted:   Jan 14, 2007 - 10:14 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

It's not Red River, but it'll do wink

Seriously though, this is one hell of a great Western score and easily amongst the very best of the best.

 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2007 - 2:14 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Are you actually going to make me drag out the tape and listen to it?

Constitutionally, your tape has the right to remain silent.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2007 - 5:36 AM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)


For those who have it, how is the DVD?


Actually I believe the sound a bit better than the Rhino CDs, but not by that much.

For listening I still prefer the re-recording on the MGM vinyl. It just seems to have more, vigor, pizazz, whetever.

BTW, does anyone know the whole story of the Tiomkin lawsuit against Newman? I've read that once Tiomkin was to score HTWWW, but then got sick and MGM hired Newman. But there was some lawsuit by Tiomkin later over it. Did that really happen?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2007 - 6:54 AM   
 By:   The_Mark_of_Score-O   (Member)

Why would Tiomkin sue Newman? If there was some kind of breach-of-contract issue, then MGM would have been the defendant in the suit.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2007 - 9:59 AM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)

The HTWWW LP was NOt a rerecording but the actual soundtrack tapes edited and with reverb added.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2007 - 2:22 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I've never seen this film, but there's plenty of good things to be found on the Rhino soundtrack. The "Overture" is probably my favourite Newman composition of all time (however, I actually prefer a recording that was made on one of those Silva Western compilations). The score is busy, direct and full of life. Also a nice version of the eternal "Greensleeves" in the "A Home in the Meadow" track with new lyrics by Sammy Cahn.

My only qualm is the usual one...it's too long. Alternate cuts could have been omitted along with some of the folksy songs (especially at the end of disc 2, such as that - if you'll excuse me - ANNOYING track "Waiting for the Hoedown") to make it a more fluid listening experience.


The Silva recording of selections from the score is dreadful. It's impossible to believe that those who made it had ever heard the original. And the Czech chorus sounds as though they're gargling with Scrabble tiles.

And it's too bad that you think that the OST Overture is too long, because what's on the Rhino disc is actually a cut-down version. The full piece runs about six-and-a-half minutes (I have a mono tape of it somewhere).


The original RECORDING might be six minutes but during the reserved seat Cinerama two+ year run in Los Angeles that I saw a gazillon (approximately) times, the overture used was....the shortest one heard on the original LP. A number of refrains were heard the first time by me on that Rhino release. And ,believe me, I would have noticed because I spent decades complaining about that butchered minute and a half main title.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2007 - 2:32 PM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)

The short overture is the only one ever heard by the public. Newman and Darby wrote and recorded one that was longer and the Rhino only has some of it- badly edited and put together.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2007 - 11:07 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

The short overture is the only one ever heard by the public. Newman and Darby wrote and recorded one that was longer and the Rhino only has some of it- badly edited and put together.

Anybody have access to the Alfred Newman Collection at USC to see how long the original overture was?

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2007 - 11:47 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

The "Overture" is actually an assembly of several separate recordings: a "Promised Land" chorus-and-orchestra intro superimposed over an orchestral excerpt of the "How The West Was Won" principal theme, followed by a full exposition of "I'm Bound For The Promised Land," "Shenandoah," "Endless Prairie," "The Ox Driver's Song," and a climactic "I'm Bound For The Promised Land" finale. Any (or all) of these components had (or may have had) far more complete renditions, and there may even have been other components (such a vocal-and-orchestra recording of "No Goodbye") that were considered, if not recorded.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2007 - 11:48 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

It's a pity that Ken Darby didn't write a companion volume to his "Hollywood Holyland" book, that would have revealed all the wonderful musical facets to the HTWWW score, since this was obviously the most joyous of all the Newman-Darby collaborative efforts.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 17, 2007 - 5:35 AM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

Why would Tiomkin sue Newman? If there was some kind of breach-of-contract issue, then MGM would have been the defendant in the suit.

Could be. It's been a long time since I read it and can't really remember the source right now.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 17, 2007 - 5:40 AM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

The HTWWW LP was NOt a rerecording but the actual soundtrack tapes edited and with reverb added.

I'm inclined to disagree with you here. But as I no longer own a version of the LP or the Sony CD, I'm not in a position to do an A-B check.

To me, it sounded like a completely different recording. Tempo was different in some pieces. Actually, I don't recall a lot of reverb at all.
Although I do think some of the source music may have not been re-recorded, like the Debbie Reynolds songs, etc.

But if you have a source for this information, I would be interested in reading about it.

 
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