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 Posted:   Jul 7, 2010 - 6:35 PM   
 By:   Ed Nassour   (Member)



Woooops! We're having an earthquake in LA!


Wow, you're an oak! Still typing while the earthquake was happening.

I feel gypped, I was sitting at my desk on an excercise ball. Didn't feel crap!


It was about 100 miles away. But I did stop typing! My house was swaying back and forth for nearly half a minute.

 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2010 - 1:14 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

Hi, I dug up this thread ...

thank you FOR USING THE search engine
bruce
smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2010 - 4:34 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I for one would not only be up for the complete used and rejected scores for Frenzy, but also Addison's complete (and remastered) Torn Curtain paired with everything Herrmann managed to record. Though the film is very mediocre, I never understood the hate for Addison's music, which I thought was pretty good even if it wasn't Herrmann.

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2010 - 5:10 PM   
 By:   Ed Nassour   (Member)

I for one would not only be up for the complete used and rejected scores for Frenzy, but also Addison's complete (and remastered) Torn Curtain paired with everything Herrmann managed to record. Though the film is very mediocre, I never understood the hate for Addison's music, which I thought was pretty good even if it wasn't Herrmann.

Yavar



That's one stinker of a movie that Herrmann's music couldn't bring back from the dead.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2010 - 5:19 PM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

I for one would not only be up for the complete used and rejected scores for Frenzy, but also Addison's complete (and remastered) Torn Curtain paired with everything Herrmann managed to record. Though the film is very mediocre, I never understood the hate for Addison's music, which I thought was pretty good even if it wasn't Herrmann.

Yavar



So long as they aren't in the same set, I'd be happy with that. I dislike Addison's TC and all of his film and TV scores, but I think Torn Curtain is a pretty decent Hitchcock potboiler, and far better than Topaz, which had a fairly decent dramatic score and still was unwatchable, in my opinion. I think a complete film rerelease on DVD/Bluray of Torn Curtain, complete with Herrmann's score tracked over it would elevate the film entirely. The excerpts that do this on the current DVD bonus features I think improve the film a million times over (and what a score from BH)!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2010 - 5:27 PM   
 By:   Ed Nassour   (Member)

I for one would not only be up for the complete used and rejected scores for Frenzy, but also Addison's complete (and remastered) Torn Curtain paired with everything Herrmann managed to record. Though the film is very mediocre, I never understood the hate for Addison's music, which I thought was pretty good even if it wasn't Herrmann.

Yavar



So long as they aren't in the same set, I'd be happy with that. I dislike Addison's TC and all of his film and TV scores, but I think Torn Curtain is a pretty decent Hitchcock potboiler, and far better than Topaz, which had a fairly decent dramatic score and still was unwatchable, in my opinion. I think a complete film rerelease on DVD/Bluray of Torn Curtain, complete with Herrmann's score tracked over it would elevate the film entirely. The excerpts that do this on the current DVD bonus features I think improve the film a million times over (and what a score from BH)!


I've got news for you. Just about any film is better than "Topaz."

Addison wrote a rather good score for a 1953 British film I watched last night on TCM entitled "The Man Between" directed by Carol Reed. The ending was similar to the later spy film "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold." Even more interesting was that Claire Bloom appeared in both films.

the absolute worst score composed by Addison was for the Universal stinkaroo "Swashbuckler."

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2010 - 5:36 PM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)



the absolute worst score composed by Addison


I can't differentiate between any of his scores as you know, but I do think Bridge Too Far bugged me especially because I could see someone like Goldsmith (who scored Attenborough's Magic a year later) really improving the film (which I thought was sluggish) tenfold. Even Alfred Ralston. I thought Addison's music was inappropriate, dated, cheap and childish, and actually made a bland snoozer ten times worse than it actually was.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2010 - 6:40 PM   
 By:   Ed Nassour   (Member)



the absolute worst score composed by Addison


I can't differentiate between any of his scores as you know, but I do think Bridge Too Far bugged me especially because I could see someone like Goldsmith (who scored Attenborough's Magic a year later) really improving the film (which I thought was sluggish) tenfold. Even Alfred Ralston. I thought Addison's music was inappropriate, dated, cheap and childish, and actually made a bland snoozer ten times worse than it actually was.


Well, Goldsmith could improve just about any film by using his extraordinary talents. Unlike many other film composers who ended up being pigeonholed with an instantly recognizable style, Goldsmith was like a chameleon. He could adapt himself to provide a great film score for any genre and not repeat himself.

 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2010 - 11:20 PM   
 By:   Scott   (Member)

I for one would not only be up for the complete used and rejected scores for Frenzy, but also Addison's complete (and remastered) Torn Curtain paired with everything Herrmann managed to record. Though the film is very mediocre, I never understood the hate for Addison's music, which I thought was pretty good even if it wasn't Herrmann.

Yavar



So long as they aren't in the same set, I'd be happy with that. I dislike Addison's TC and all of his film and TV scores, but I think Torn Curtain is a pretty decent Hitchcock potboiler, and far better than Topaz, which had a fairly decent dramatic score and still was unwatchable, in my opinion. I think a complete film rerelease on DVD/Bluray of Torn Curtain, complete with Herrmann's score tracked over it would elevate the film entirely. The excerpts that do this on the current DVD bonus features I think improve the film a million times over (and what a score from BH)!


I've got news for you. Just about any film is better than "Topaz."

Addison wrote a rather good score for a 1953 British film I watched last night on TCM entitled "The Man Between" directed by Carol Reed. The ending was similar to the later spy film "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold." Even more interesting was that Claire Bloom appeared in both films.

the absolute worst score composed by Addison was for the Universal stinkaroo "Swashbuckler."


I have the soundtrack to SWASHBUCKLER and I love it! By contrast, I'd have to say that Addison's score for TORN CURTAIN is one of my least favorites from him.

TOPAZ is a flawed film to be sure but it's got some great stuff in it. Just about any film is better than TOPAZ?! That's a bit harsh.

Bring on FRENZY double score! I would buy that in a heartbeat!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2010 - 11:41 PM   
 By:   Ed Nassour   (Member)

I for one would not only be up for the complete used and rejected scores for Frenzy, but also Addison's complete (and remastered) Torn Curtain paired with everything Herrmann managed to record. Though the film is very mediocre, I never understood the hate for Addison's music, which I thought was pretty good even if it wasn't Herrmann.

Yavar



So long as they aren't in the same set, I'd be happy with that. I dislike Addison's TC and all of his film and TV scores, but I think Torn Curtain is a pretty decent Hitchcock potboiler, and far better than Topaz, which had a fairly decent dramatic score and still was unwatchable, in my opinion. I think a complete film rerelease on DVD/Bluray of Torn Curtain, complete with Herrmann's score tracked over it would elevate the film entirely. The excerpts that do this on the current DVD bonus features I think improve the film a million times over (and what a score from BH)!


I've got news for you. Just about any film is better than "Topaz."

Addison wrote a rather good score for a 1953 British film I watched last night on TCM entitled "The Man Between" directed by Carol Reed. The ending was similar to the later spy film "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold." Even more interesting was that Claire Bloom appeared in both films.

the absolute worst score composed by Addison was for the Universal stinkaroo "Swashbuckler."


I have the soundtrack to SWASHBUCKLER and I love it! By contrast, I'd have to say that Addison's score for TORN CURTAIN is one of my least favorites from him.

TOPAZ is a flawed film to be sure but it's got some great stuff in it. Just about any film is better than TOPAZ?! That's a bit harsh.

Bring on FRENZY double score! I would buy that in a heartbeat!!


Unfortunately for me I worked on "Swashbuckler" for eleven long months. I sat on the Universal scoring stage while Addsion conducted his score. It might be 'fun' to listen to, but mixed into the film it did nothing to lift what was a dreadful movie into the realm of a watchable flick.

The stories I could tell about that production!

The original plan was to release the film in 4-track magnetic stereo, but after the Universal 'suits' saw the director's first cut, that idea went out the window. I do remember they recorded all the production tracks on two and even three separate tracks which became a difficult task for the assistant editors.

The film was originally planned as a Clint Eastwood vehicle. John Williams was to compose the score. But after Eastwood realized the film had a terrible script that couldn't be improved to his liking and would be a logistical nightmare to film, he dropped out and with him went John Williams.

Addison was a gentleman and we enjoyed several lunches where he told me great stories of working in the British film industry.

One Addison score I like very much was for "Pool of London" (1951).

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 12:35 AM   
 By:   krais   (Member)

Addison's Torn Curtain is quite phlegmatic. Not the worst soundtrack ever, but certainly far from the best. The worst part for me is the hotel music in the beginning, it's just annoyingly faux-cheerful, and when he quotes Funeral March of the Marionettes when Hitchcock appears... ugh! But in all fairness, he must have had strict orders to avoid a darker sound anyway. Still, I'd have Herrmann's music over it any day!

Back to Frenzy, does anyone have connections or any way to check if Mancini managed to record the whole score, and if the tapes still exist? I know getting such information is a bit unlikely, but at the moment I'm as optimistic as Addison's music...

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 12:41 AM   
 By:   voiced   (Member)


The film was originally planned as a Clint Eastwood vehicle. John Williams was to compose the score. But after Eastwood realized the film had a terrible script that couldn't be improved to his liking and would be a logistical nightmare to film, he dropped out and with him went John Williams.

Addison was a gentleman and we enjoyed several lunches where he told me great stories of working in the British film industry.

One Addison score I like very much was for "Pool of London" (1951).


Sleuth is one of my favourites and needs a release sans the dialogue.

That's fascinating re the Eastwood / Williams connection.

Frenzy is a release i've wanted for so long, my father played principal horn on both sessions and always said the shift in mood was huge, so it'll be great to finally compare the two if they were released together.

The tapes definitely exist as Ron Shillingford said so himself when I spoke with him a few years back. The hold up is presumably contractual stuff.

- Tim

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 12:47 AM   
 By:   voiced   (Member)

The tapes for the Ron Goodwin session that is, I can't comment re the Mancini tapes.

However, as was mentioned earlier, Laurent Bouzerou must have had access to them for his DVD documentary for the main title insertion.

- Tim

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 1:13 AM   
 By:   Ed Nassour   (Member)


The film was originally planned as a Clint Eastwood vehicle. John Williams was to compose the score. But after Eastwood realized the film had a terrible script that couldn't be improved to his liking and would be a logistical nightmare to film, he dropped out and with him went John Williams.

Addison was a gentleman and we enjoyed several lunches where he told me great stories of working in the British film industry.

One Addison score I like very much was for "Pool of London" (1951).


Sleuth is one of my favourites and needs a release sans the dialogue.

That's fascinating re the Eastwood / Williams connection.


Williams had composed the score for Eastwood's "The Eiger Sanction." Clint loved his work on that film. I was on the Universal music stage when Williams conducted a cue dropped from the film, but was included on the soundtrack LP. That cue played when Eastwood's character drove Miles Mellough (Jack Cassidy) out into the desert, leaving him there to die. Just the very end of the cue is in the film.

During the sessions at Universal, Williams hated the boxy sound on the crummy Universal stage so the sessions were moved to the larger, much better sounding scoring stage at Burbank Studios, now back to being Warner Brothers. That scoring stage is now named after Eastwood since it was Clint who battled with WB execs to save that stage from permanent closure.

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 1:15 AM   
 By:   krais   (Member)

Thanks, Voiced. Interesting to hear about the mood shift, makes me want the release of both soundtracks even more!

The question that's crucial is did Mancini record the whole score or was it cancelled midway through recording. Fascinating stuff!

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 1:18 AM   
 By:   krais   (Member)

Voiced, has your father said if the Mancini session was complete? I assume such a showdown as with Herrmann wouldn't have happened again... but that's just an assumption.

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 1:24 AM   
 By:   voiced   (Member)


Williams had composed the score for Eastwood's "The Eiger Sanction." Clint loved his work on that film. I was on the Universal music stage when Williams conducted a cue dropped from the film, but was included on the soundtrack LP. That cue played when Eastwood's character drove Miles Mellough (Jack Cassidy) out into the desert, leaving him there to die. Just the very end of the cue is in the film.

During the sessions at Universal, Williams hated the boxy sound on the crummy Universal stage so the sessions were moved to the larger, much better sounding scoring stage at Burbank Studios, now back to being Warner Brothers. That scoring stage is now named after Eastwood since it was Clint who battled with WB execs to save that stage from permanent closure.


I love that score and always felt that the orchestra seemed too small for the writing, some of the grander cues (the Icy Ascent / Top of the World cues specifically) cry out for a more expansive sound in my opinion.

- Tim

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 1:35 AM   
 By:   voiced   (Member)

Voiced, has your father said if the Mancini session was complete? I assume such a showdown as with Herrmann wouldn't have happened again... but that's just an assumption.

He never mentioned and I can't imagine there was such a tense or awkward atmosphere as with the Torn Curtain scenario as he would've said. Oh to have been a fly on the wall eh?!

- Tim

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 4:12 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

I think you'll find that much - but not all - of the Goodwin catalogue is still stored in the family library (which would be, in most cases, Ron's own copies of the tapes). As ever, the problem remains for investment to complete the clean-up process on the old tapes and transfer to digital. Its been done on a few scores that have already been released.
It is, I'm told, an expensive process? Others on here would know better than me.

For what its worth, even though a few tapes may no longer exist on some scores, the written partitures are still safely stored for all Goodwin scores, should anyone wish to pursue re-recording of lost music.

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2010 - 2:43 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

.

Frenzy is a release i've wanted for so long, my father played principal horn on both sessions
- Tim



way cool!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! smile
bruce

ps i have never heard the eastwood/SWASHBUCLER story.
sounds like a croc to me

 
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