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 Posted:   Feb 1, 2008 - 9:24 PM   
 By:   Ag^Janus   (Member)

Still curious as to which one, one open to the public, like LC? How's that for alphabet soup?

The archives I worked for is open to the public. I'm guessing that the tapes in question would only be made available to someone doing academic, literary or musical research.


Seems like a prime opportunity for a special release for film music enthusiasts. I'd love to hear the Raksin radio programs myself, but I suspect that will be very difficult indeed.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 1, 2008 - 11:21 AM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

Anyone order this CD from the SCL? I ask because a friend (who doesn't belong to this forum) tells me he placed an order about two months ago, the SCL charged his credit card immediately, and he never received anything. He said he tried contacting them but they never responded, and that there's some kind of disclaimer on their site asking people to not bug them about orders that aren't filled right away (or something like that) because they're an all-volunteer organization. Curious to know if anybody had any better luck than my friend did?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 1, 2008 - 12:14 PM   
 By:   crazyunclerolo   (Member)

Anyone order this CD from the SCL? I ask because a friend (who doesn't belong to this forum) tells me he placed an order about two months ago, the SCL charged his credit card immediately, and he never received anything. He said he tried contacting them but they never responded, and that there's some kind of disclaimer on their site asking people to not bug them about orders that aren't filled right away (or something like that) because they're an all-volunteer organization. Curious to know if anybody had any better luck than my friend did?

MMM--
I had the exact same experience as your friend. Then I finally disputed the charge through my credit card company, and the package suddenly appeared. There are other items I'd like to purchase from the Society, but I don't want to go through that again.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 1, 2008 - 12:35 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

Thanks for the reply. I'll pass the link to this thread on to my friend.

 
 Posted:   Apr 1, 2008 - 4:43 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)


MMM--
I had the exact same experience as your friend. Then I finally disputed the charge through my credit card company, and the package suddenly appeared. There are other items I'd like to purchase from the Society, but I don't want to go through that again.


Thanks for the info. That title was first on my list to buy.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 1, 2008 - 5:26 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

The site seems to suggest that there are only twenty minutes of music on the disc. Is that all that survives?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2008 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

As far as an update on the SCL, my friend e-mailed them wondering where his CD was that he got instantly charged for, and the SCL rep gave him a "heartfelt plea" about how they're going to take care of things to his satisfaction, but it's now almost a month later and he still hasn't received the disc, his money back, or any other communication from them.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2008 - 10:20 PM   
 By:   crazyunclerolo   (Member)

He did better than I did to get any reply at all. I went from polite to insistent to angry to threatening, and never heard one word from them. Like I said in my earlier post, disputing the charge on my credit card rang the magic bell. Suddenly, my package arrived. They included a couple little extra presents, which I guess were meant as a peace offering, but I would've rather had an actual apology for all of the time and trouble they cost me.

 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2008 - 10:43 PM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

I ordered this CD in January. A month later it still had not arrived (although the charge had gone through immediately) and I made both email and telephone inquiries. After a month of no replies I requested my credit card company to dispute the charge. Suddenly I had an email apology, complete with excuses about key people being "out of the country longer than expected" and promises of imminent delivery, but by then I no longer cared and told them to forget it.

There's really no excuse for such sloppy service, even if they are non-profit.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2008 - 11:52 PM   
 By:   crazyunclerolo   (Member)

They sure have an efficient system when it comes to charging your credit card, don't they? Nobody's ever around to answer queries, pack up your order, or mail it out, but the person who charges your credit card is on the job TWENTY-FOUR SEVEN!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 29, 2008 - 7:20 AM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

Just received the e-mail below. To be fair, I had called and left a message only once and had yet to complain to my credit card company. I appreciate Ms. Dunn's courtesy:

"Dear Lester,

Our sincerest apologies for the delay. We just received the Raksin Redeemer CDs in this past weekend and are in the process of sending them out today (Monday) and tomorrow (Tuesday). Thank you for your patience. We appreciate those who have been patient while waiting for this item. Your order will be there before the end of the week.
Again, our sincerest apologies for the delay. Please let us know if you have any questions or concerns.

Best regards,
Laura Dunn
Executive Director
The Society of Composers & Lyricists"

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 29, 2008 - 9:15 AM   
 By:   crazyunclerolo   (Member)

I hope that they've learned from past mistakes and are correcting their problems. If I hear enough positive reports from other board members, I'd love to order other items from them. I've been burned too badly to do so without a lot of evidence that their service has drastically improved.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 29, 2008 - 5:48 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

My friend forwarded me a copy of the e-mail he got from the SCL, and the response you got was a form letter -- every word in your e-mail was absolutely identical to what he received. However, the SCL did add an "excuse" in his e-mail stating that these were a "labor of love" and that they didn't make money from offering these CDs, so I guess good service is only required when you're releasing things you don't love.

 
 
 Posted:   May 6, 2008 - 11:57 AM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

Received Raksin's "Redeemer" yesterday. The CD and packaging lack the superior production values seen in FSM, Intrada, Brigham Young, and SAE releases but nevertheless contains about twenty minutes of really deep neo-Bachian writing. An intricately concise score similar in its thematic integration to Raksin's "Invitation to a Gunfighter." Well worth the wait.

 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2009 - 12:56 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)




(click on SCL Store, then Composer to Composer, then go to the 2nd page to find the cd).
http://www.thescl.com/site/scl/


Aaaa, nuts! It looks like it's sold out now, dangit!

http://www.thescl.com/php/section.php?id=4929&pos=10


I was going to buy a copy now that I'm out from under credit card debt.

 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2009 - 9:06 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

I was going to buy a copy now that I'm out from under credit card debt.

Try emailing them. Can't hurt, might help.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2009 - 5:39 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I was going to buy a copy now that I'm out from under credit card debt.

Try emailing them. Can't hurt, might help.


Worth a try!

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2020 - 7:11 PM   
 By:   MusicUnite   (Member)

Thanks again, Peter, but I have already been able to track down the soundtrack through other sources. Amazing.

Thor, I have an reel-to-reel with the Raksin music (-did Raksin send copies in this method or only LPs I wonder?) from Redeemer, etc, but I honestly have no idea if the tracks are in proper order or even what tracks represent which films (I don't have timings, nor does the LP apparently).

Could I asked a big favor from you? Would you kindly post the correct track names,order and timings if this is not too much trouble? Thor, I would be incredibly beholden to you! LOL

Many Thanks if you can,

Jay

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 1:07 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Alas, I lost this set (or the digital files, to be precise) in my harddisk crash two years ago, BUT....I still found the information in an old txt-file! Now I'm not sure if this is the same set you have, MusicUnite, but here goes anyway:

From the 2 LPs that accompanied the Library of Congress book "Wonderful Inventions" -- which served to illustrate two essays -- "Sound Idea: Music for Animated Films" and "David Raksin: A Composer in Hollywood."

Tracks on CD-R:

1. "First Kiss" from "Force of Evil"
2. "Bottom of the World" (original uncut version) form "Force of Evil"
3. "Finale" (original uncut version) from "Carrie"
4. "Come With Me" from "Carrie"
5. "Come With Me" (with dialogue) from "Carrie"
6. "Verkehrte Nacht" from "Separate Tables"
7. "It Made Me (sic)" from "Separate Tables"
8. "Unravelled Knight" from "Separate Tables"
9. "Too Soon" from "Separate Tables"
10. "Prologue" from "The Redeemer"
11. "Crucifixion" and "Epilogue" from "The Redeemer"

Source material for these monophonic recordings were glass base acetate transcription discs or acetate base magnetic recording tapes.

Description for cues track-by-track from the LP jacket liner notes:

1. Here is a love scene from the minor classic about mis-organized crime in New York, "Force of Evil," in which the tough-but-tender-hearted Joe Morse (John Garfield) remorsefully courts the affection and sympathy of the innocent girl whom his misguided machinations have involved in an increasing tangled and ultimately self-destructive situation.

2. The sad conclusion of "Force of Evil" combines frenetic action with an almost catatonic emotional state. Feelings of failure and grief motivate Joe Morse as he seeks and finds his brother's body that gangsters have dumped under Manhattan's George Washington Bridge.

3. The sentimental film treatment of Theodore Dreiser's novel "Sister Carrie" originally ended with a graphic treatment of the protagonist's flophouse suicide. As Hurstwood (Laurence Olivier) lies dying, Carrie (Jennifer Jones) runs through the streets searching frantically for him. In this long sequence, cut from the final version, the composer used music heard earlier in the film to establish parallels between the final and earlier actions. Visually all the thematic material from the film is recapitulated here. Director William Wyler excised this cinematic ending -- and with it, the composer's music -- for a more stagelike one in which Hurstwood's death is represented by the empty open door through which he has made his exit, and the adumbration of his offstage death by the retention of a few seconds' close-up in which he briefly turns on a gas burner.

4 and 5. This scene, presented first without and then with dialogue, takes place in a park where, midway in the drama, Hurstwood proposes to Carrie. In the film transformation of Dreiser's novel, Hurstwood's hesitancy at the point when he is about to confess to Carrie that he is already married and his failure to tell her contribute to the tragedy. His inability to speak to her honestly is due, at least in part, to the fact that he is the victim of the moral conventions of his time and place, turn-of-the-century middle-class America.

6. When Terrence Rattigan's play "Separate Tables" -- which belongs to the "Grand Hotel/Ship of Fools" genre (in this case the drama takes place in a small English seaside boarding house) -- was made into a film, the director wanted conventionally romantic music to underscore the tense reunion of the divorced couple, John (Burt Lancaster) and Ann (Rita Hayworth). But the composer wrote this music more in keeping with the tone of the intense love-hate relationship that the playwright examined and the actors portrayed.

7. The other plot in "Separate Tables" involves a nervous, mother-dominated young woman, Sibyl (Deborah Kerr), and an older man with whom she is infatuated, the dashing but strangely furtive Major Pollock (David Niven). This music accompanies Sibyl's hysterical outburst when her mother sadistically and publicly confronts her with news of the Major's arrest for sexual misconduct in a movie theater.

8. After the first preview of "Separate Tables", there was a furor among the distributors, and the blame centered on the scoring for the reunion scene for which the director had wanted conventionally romantic music. Here is what the composer supplied, under duress, to accommodate more nearly the filmmakers' view of what the scene represented.

9. This music follows John and Ann after their passionate reunion. They go to Ann's bedroom, where John, having begun to realize that the circumstance of their meeting was contrived by Ann, explodes. He leaves. Ann runs after him, then he strikes her and runs out. After the excitement dies down, there is a lap dissolve that brings us to the next morning and the sight of a troubled Major.

10. and 11. The "Prologue" (track 10), "Crucifixion and "Epilogue" (track 11) from "The Redeemer" make a highly satisfactory symphonic piece through one simple alteration of the soundtrack score: The joyous resurrection music that accompanies the end titles of the film immediately follows the Crucifixion.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 11:23 AM   
 By:   RonBurbella   (Member)

I did order this box set (Book and LPs, if I recall correctly) directly from the Library of Congress, when it first was available.
It seemed to be a one-of-a-kind item, not one of a series. Ordering was kind of cumbersome.

If I can contribute anything to you, like LP-to-CDR copy, let me know. Making a copy from a reel-to-reel tape might be difficult, unless you have a working deck. (Actually, I do.)

This was a real oddball item at the time, and it was mainly promoted for purchase by public libraries and university libraries.
I did play it at the time, and I thought the sound quality and the music quality were good. I hadn't seen the films at the time, so there was no mental film-connection to make. Actually, I think I was more impressed by the animated film score music. The collectible fact was that the music was unreleased.

This makes me wonder...it was such an oddball item, I may even have gotten a spare copy at the time. Striking while the iron was hot, so to speak. Might even be still sealed in the original mailing box, tucked away somewhere. Have to look around the Burbella archives when I get home from the office. At 70, my remote memory isn't always what it used to be. But I do recall right where it should be. Making a beeline when I get home.

Ron Burbella

 
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