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 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 9:36 AM   
 By:   alexp   (Member)

alexp said,
When you played that “Superman” march to the roommate, did he recognize the music right-away, or did you had to tell him? Please, tell us how did that moment played-out


SchiffyM
It was just playing when he walked into the room, but he recognized it right away and started pretending he was flying, complete with “whooshing” sound effects!

Ha!, Ha!, Ha!, Ha!, Ha!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 10:01 AM   
 By:   alexp   (Member)


I am looking forward to a summer presentation of "The Empire Strikes Back" in concert, and I am curious who would be the decision maker to start that process for "Superman"? It seems to me, given the film edits, that restoring portions of the score dialed out would require more than just simply distributing to the orchestra the sheet music used by the LSO in 1978, and I would hope those creative decisions would be made by Mr. Williams.


I suspect that the scenes where the music would dial out and back up were shorter versions. These scenes may have been longer when Williams worked on it. Because these scenes were trimmed, so was the music. The areas where the music splice was made may not sound good, musically. So, instead of polishing the music to accommodate the edits, the music audio level—or volume--would dial out at the appropriate point before the music splice would be reached, like at a loud sound such as an explosion or a loud crash. Then the music would come back after the splice.

Maybe Mike M. can elaborate on that.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   alexp   (Member)


I just got the notice that Empire is on the Phoenix Symphony's program next year. It didn't even occur to me the choices that would have to be made (assuming they don't just play the music as heard in the film). Do they play Speeds or Hyperspace? Do the play the film opening or the album? Do they play the dialed out music over Luke and Vader's duel?


Every last bit of music editing/tracking/looping of each of the final films--the Blu Ray cuts--in the Star Wars Concert Series is replicated live by the orchestra.

For further research on these concerts, you can read here:
http://www.jwfan.com/forums/index.php?/topic/27124-star-wars-live-to-projection-concerts/

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 2:43 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

If a composer writes music that isn't used in a film
or
writes music that is never recorded
does he own the rights to the music?

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 4:11 PM   
 By:   Traveling Matt   (Member)

In fondness of the Blue Box...

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 5:08 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Blue box version never clicked with me in the same way as this new release has so I absolutely suggest upgrading if you are a fan of this score.

I’d like to hear more about this opinion. Because this one is newer? Because you are a decade older than you were when the last version came out?


Best way I can describe it is subconsciously I noticed there was something off about the audio in The Blue Box version. I would listen to it but not feel the same emotional attachment. This newer version has a lot more clarity. I find it similar to how Apollo 13 never clicked with me in the earlier versions until I heard the Intrada release. Sound quality plays heavily into my enjoyment of a score. Or to ruffle more features, HTTYD1 never clicked with me in the same way as HTTYD2 did, which to me had something to do with the way the scores were mastered. HTTYD2 always sounded more natural to me.

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 7:46 PM   
 By:   townerbarry   (Member)


I am looking forward to a summer presentation of "The Empire Strikes Back" in concert, and I am curious who would be the decision maker to start that process for "Superman"? It seems to me, given the film edits, that restoring portions of the score dialed out would require more than just simply distributing to the orchestra the sheet music used by the LSO in 1978, and I would hope those creative decisions would be made by Mr. Williams.


I suspect that the scenes where the music would dial out and back up were shorter versions. These scenes may have been longer when Williams worked on it. Because these scenes were trimmed, so was the music. The areas where the music splice was made may not sound good, musically. So, instead of polishing the music to accommodate the edits, the music audio level—or volume--would dial out at the appropriate point before the music splice would be reached, like at a loud sound such as an explosion or a loud crash. Then the music would come back after the splice.

Maybe Mike M. can elaborate on that.


I believe on the DVD, The trip to earth, that Donner and Tom Mankiewicz said that sequence ...”hurry up” that the scene went on way too long and get to earth faster. There must of been two version. I also got the impression that Donner and Stuart Baird Clashed Over the Editing Of Superman, That even Baird walked out several times.

I have always heard that the reason for Alternate Title Sequences was...The Boy And the Superman Comic Book in Black And White was added in late..and the music editor ..edited in the older version with that glaring cut.

Donner said on the DVD and in interviews..That Superman was originally supposed to be released in summer of 1977. But remember..Donner was filming Superman and Superman 2 at the same time. Tom Mankiewicz said at one point they had to Stop the filming and put an ending on Superman...here where it truly gets way out there...Donner came up with idea of Stoping Superman with a Cliffhanger and 6 months Superman 2 continues on from the cliffhanger. Like an old serial movie, the way they used to do Buster Crabbes And So On.

This why Donner has said over and over..He had Jerry Goldsmith at one point and time, then Jerry was out then Williams was Available, Then Out ..back to Goldsmith...They were all waiting on Visual Effects, I believe that Williams scored at first a slightly different Superman, and it changed as soon as those Visuals were produced and placed in. I believe in a podcast that Mike Matessino Williams wrote Superman Music late 1977 in London, went back to US to score Jaws 2 and 6 months later to finish up Superman.

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 7:51 PM   
 By:   townerbarry   (Member)

If a composer writes music that isn't used in a film
or
writes music that is never recorded
does he own the rights to the music?



Alex North took his rejected score for 2001...and it ended up in The Shoes Of a Fisherman.

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 8:00 PM   
 By:   Mike Matessino   (Member)

And Dragonslayer.

Film scores are works for hire and the recordings become owned by the entities that paid for them whether the material is used or not. The composer, however, receives a publishing royalty which generates payments for any use of the music -- arrangements, rerecordings, public performance, use in commercials or trailers, etc.

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 8:06 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

I know that.
But. do the studios own publishing bfor music that was never recorded?

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2019 - 8:18 PM   
 By:   Mike Matessino   (Member)

I know that.
But. do the studios own publishing bfor music that was never recorded?


Not sure. Generally speaking I would imagine they would retain ownership, but it likely depends on the circumstances and what the content of the unrecorded music is (if it uses themes from a published score, etc.).

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2019 - 5:28 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

Like other Brits I know, SUPERMAN arrived with NO customs note! So my fears of having to deal with a ransom demand were allayed.

Thank you.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2019 - 7:09 AM   
 By:   ghost of 82   (Member)

Yep, me too- arrived yesterday with no charges. There's no Kryptonite at the HMRC, thank goodness.

Looking forward to listening to it over the weekend. I'll be having flashbacks to 1978...

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2019 - 7:15 AM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Why is LLL holding back on their shipments of SUPERMAN to SAE and Intrada ?

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2019 - 8:53 AM   
 By:   other tallguy   (Member)

In fondness of the Blue Box...


That's terrific!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2019 - 11:38 AM   
 By:   deepscan   (Member)

Why is LLL holding back on their shipments of SUPERMAN to SAE and Intrada ?

Can't answer that, but it is a good thing I canceled my order from SAE and went straight to LaLaLand.

By the way, after taking in the new CD, I can tell you in a nutshell that the sound is crisp, the fidelity is superb (even outlasting the Rhino CD and original LP--not to talk bad about the two previous releases since they stand out on their own and considering what the producers had to work with at the time), and some tracks really bring out the impact of the original recordings never before experienced...except to those people who worked on the original 1978 recordings. Great job, Mike and crew!

I am sure the score presentation sequence on the CD does its best to honor the integrity of what John Williams had original conceived, but that is what iTunes is for...to rearrange the tracks to more or less their sequencing in the film, especially the way the main and end title tracks were used in the film.

As for "Can You Read My Mind" (the stirring love theme), I too was disappointed in 1978 that it did not receive an Oscar nomination for Best Original Song, but somehow the songs that ended up being nominated were the key in CYRMM's omission.

Another irony in the music of SUPERMAN's loss in the Oscars...Giogiro Moroder's Oscar win for "Midnight Express" set the stage for the techno-synth scores of the current era, and that may have helped Richard Lester hiring him to do some of the music and songs for SUPERMAN III. Quite a paradox.

Enjoy the CD and order before it goes like the planet Krypton.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2019 - 12:35 PM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

Does MV Gerhard think it'll be safe to wait until Christmas to get this one?

I'll be devastated if I can't get it, but money may just be too tight for the forseeable future, and I blew a lot of dinero getting John Williams' Dracula, WarGames, The Legend of the Lone Ranger, and of course the latest iteration of The Beatles' White Album over the holidays.

Yes, I knew this was coming, but was adamant about all those titles.

 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2019 - 8:38 AM   
 By:   Adam B.   (Member)

Sound quality is so good on this release you can almost hear the tape scraping over the tape heads on the machine. Superb. Another triumph for LLL's catalog of titles.

 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2019 - 9:29 AM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Should have mine soon. Lala shipped it almost immediately after my order.

 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2019 - 4:40 PM   
 By:   townerbarry   (Member)

Why is LLL holding back on their shipments of SUPERMAN to SAE and Intrada ?

Can't answer that, but it is a good thing I canceled my order from SAE and went straight to LaLaLand.

By the way, after taking in the new CD, I can tell you in a nutshell that the sound is crisp, the fidelity is superb (even outlasting the Rhino CD and original LP--not to talk bad about the two previous releases since they stand out on their own and considering what the producers had to work with at the time), and some tracks really bring out the impact of the original recordings never before experienced...except to those people who worked on the original 1978 recordings. Great job, Mike and crew!

I am sure the score presentation sequence on the CD does its best to honor the integrity of what John Williams had original conceived, but that is what iTunes is for...to rearrange the tracks to more or less their sequencing in the film, especially the way the main and end title tracks were used in the film.

As for "Can You Read My Mind" (the stirring love theme), I too was disappointed in 1978 that it did not receive an Oscar nomination for Best Original Song, but somehow the songs that ended up being nominated were the key in CYRMM's omission.

Another irony in the music of SUPERMAN's loss in the Oscars...Giogiro Moroder's Oscar win for "Midnight Express" set the stage for the techno-synth scores of the current era, and that may have helped Richard Lester hiring him to do some of the music and songs for SUPERMAN III. Quite a paradox.

Enjoy the CD and order before it goes like the planet Krypton.


Song..not Spoken..Gets a Nomination. It was Spoken by Margot Kidder I the movie, Yes Maureen McGovern(Said it is the Best Song to a Movie she sang) sang the Song, But not in the movie...Them Oscar Pesky Rules.

 
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