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 Posted:   Sep 7, 2017 - 11:38 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

"Two Tall Men"
By: Fred Steiner
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZZ3n2SUh6w

This episode asks the question: What do you do when you need a doctor and the doctor is the one who needs it? And the town of assholes -- continuing to asshole -- has no Matt around to keep them in check.

Highlights:
  • 21:35 in: a cue that opens up with an oboe and then some soft brass and strings. More mood than musical accomplishment, so don't expect the world from this cue.
  • 33:37 in: another cue badly edited into one before it. But a good cue.
  • About 37:15 in.
  • 38:40 in. More after it ends from a commercial break.
  • About 46:20 in.

    Good God -- that fire scene. You could never get away with that today. An actual wooden beam fell on a guy's back, then he fell into the fire!

    I guess it's an okay episode. It's a good example of rushing to judgment.




    "The New Society"
    By: Fred Steiner
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBUoFu16SZc

    Highlights:
  • 0:15 in: The light dramatic take on the series' theme, with snare drum, opening over the title card and into the episode.
  • About 8:50 in: a nice cue, again badly edited into another.
  • 29:10 in: a cue that runs the gambit of emotions for almost a minute.
  • About 33:33 in.
  • About 43:40 in: some action music that reminds me of Goldsmith.
  • 46:00 in.
  • 49:13 in: the closing cue with strings and a little harmonica. Timpani and brass build with the strings and it closes out on a low-key way.

    An okay episode. Kind of ambitious in it's complex storyline.




    "He Who Steals" (season finale)
    By: Bruce Geller, Van McCoy and Herschel Burke Gilbert
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yd4QdCvkQBU

    Though Gilbert conducted a number of episode scores, this is the only episode he and the other two contributed to.

    Yes, that's Bruce Geller the producer and writer of TV series like "Mission: Impossible".

    I was surprised by this because years ago when I was trying to solve the composer on each episode of the series and turned to some help from fans because not every episode was on Youtube or TV Land (which was airing it and sometimes put episodes on their site). I was told Bruce was the composer. No other names mentioned. I went to double check it to make sure they didn't mean Harry Geller and that's when I found the surprises.

    Highlights:
  • 6:24 in: pretty sure this is a tracked bit from a Schrager-scored episode.
  • About 10:25 in: a nice piece with woodwinds and an acoustic guitar. It's short. More at about 12:35 in.
  • 24:41 in.
  • About 26:35 in.
  • Somewhere shortly after 31:00 in.
  • About 32:30 in.
  • 36:52 in.
  • 45:51 in. Another cue that sounds like it was crossfaded into a previous one.

    By the way, a song on McCoy's website from an unspecified episode (not this one -- no songs in it):
    http://vanmccoymusic.com/van/discography/60s/play.php?id=69




    And that concludes Season 10. Stay tuned today for Morton Stevens, and more returning names, in a few hours.

  •  
     
     Posted:   Sep 7, 2017 - 11:41 AM   
     By:   (Member)   (Member)

    Music-wise, Bruce Geller is known as a song writer: see his input on "Rawhide" and "Mission: Impossible".

     
     Posted:   Sep 7, 2017 - 1:58 PM   
     By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

    SEASON 11:

    The opening credits music has been re-recorded, with some changes. But that's now a defunct way to describe it -- it's now a pre-credits sequence. Now the show has an actual opening credits sequence. As if typical with every single season of the show, nobody is credited with the arrangement. Though Stevens did season thirteen, and Steiner did one and another composer I don't recall the name of, did one.

    There is also a short pre-end credits piece, too. As well as a new end credits arrangement.




    "Seven Hours To Dawn"
    By: Morton Stevens (Emmy nominated)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTDiYniZVMs (

    This is Stevens' first effort for the series.

    That year, 1966, he and other Emmy nominees lost out to:
    "Michelangelo: The Last Giant" (Laurence Rosenthal)

    Highlights:
  • About 2:45 in: an atypical approach beginning with piano. More at 3:41, right after the opening credits.
  • 6:25 in: some aggressive snare drum rolls with a lower octave piano culmination, leading to some brass for an ending.
  • About 11:20 in.
  • About 13:00 in.
  • About 20:05 in.
  • About 24:43 in.
  • 44:20 in: some brass and cymbal crashes for a train arriving.

    That's most of the score. I know this score has it's fans, but I just can't put it in a top tier effort list. I'd have to give it a second tier effort status.

    I guess it's a good episode. It's probably the nearest Matt has come to death.

    It's a shame after such an episode, Matt and Kitty went nowhere.




    "The Storm"
    By: Leon Klatzkin

    Even though I said I was skipping the Klatzkin efforts, I did want to mention this is his first effort for the series.




    "Clayton Thaddeus Greenwood"
    By: Richard Shores
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUTQ1LaNRmI

    Highlights:
  • 4:45 in: the first cue of the episode.
  • About 30:25 in.
  • Somewhere around 39:00 in. Also use of an anvil -- I think the first in a credited episode score. Goes on for over two minutes.
  • About 49:10 in: the closing cue.

    Not a bad episode.

    Doc: "See how out-of-town folks appreciate me more than the locals do?"
    Festus: "I'll tell you why that is: 'cause they ain't had as many sorry dealings with you as we have."
    Doc: "You know, I don't know whether you got anything else to do, but if you have, I wish you'd go do it someplace else."

    Festus: "Right there is the ornery oldest scutter I ever did saw," talking about Doc (a phrase Festus would use to describe Doc a number of times of the years).

    Doc: "Now that you're a lawman, you don't have to pay me anything. Matt never does."




    I'll have extra time tomorrow, so more reviews than normal then. Expect more Morton Stevens and more returning names.

  •  
     
     Posted:   Sep 8, 2017 - 4:28 AM   
     By:   (Member)   (Member)

    "Seven Hours to Dawn" is not only good, martial and ominous but it anticipates the score for "Major Glory". It's a good episode and actor John Drew Barrymore does a good performance as in "Rawhide", by the way.

    "Clayton Thaddeus Greenwood" feature a vivid UNCLE-esque cue at 34:09 when the wild cowboys beat up a young man inside a restaurant.


    PS: Can you please do the rundown on Klatzkin episodes?
    Can you at least mention Klatzkin episodes and the related links? Thanks.
    It's for stock music purpose.


    "The Storm"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOO4EAr-Mpo

     
     Posted:   Sep 8, 2017 - 2:45 PM   
     By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

    "Ten Little Indians"
    By: Fred Steiner
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AB5hltUvcg8

    Fox Mulder: "If coincidences are coincidences, why do they feel so contrived?"

    In 1965 Goldsmith scored a film called "Ten Little Indians", then in 1966 Steiner scored an episode by that title and Steiner worked on "Star Trek: The Motion Picture", which Goldsmith scored.

    EDIT:
    That's 1973 and it's "One Little Indian".

    Highlights:
  • About 5:00 in: a feel-good kind of romp piece with brass and snare and a little bit of woodwinds.
  • About 7:28 in: a low-key piece that sounds like it uses the opening of the "Star Trek" theme.
  • 30:21 in: trembling strings open and dominate this suspense piece. There's a pause for a few seconds and it picks back up for some chase music. About three minutes.

    Something I've noticed in Steiner's music is even though it's the 1960's, I'm hearing a good deal of writing and orchestration choices that sound like the 1980's.

    The score isn't exactly in your face most of the time, but it's done so well and it's interesting to listen to, I'm going to have go ahead and put it in the second tier of efforts for the series.

    This episode is another prime example of how Festus is not Chester, yet still a character as good as Chester. No interchangeable characters here.

    Doc: "Sit around and wait to get shot if you want to, but you're not very considerate of other folks."
    Matt: "Who's that?"
    Doc: "Well, me for one. I'm lucky if I don't get waken up in the middle of the night to pick bullets out of your back."
    Matt: "Well, I'll tell ya: maybe I'll arrange to get shot after breakfast then."




    "Kioga"
    By: Lyn Murray
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuvSeHfXzYc

    Highlights:
  • 14:51 in: some kind of hand percussion instrument in unison with some fretless electric guitar work, with sleigh bells and woodwinds. More about 24:30 in. Nearly completely dialogue free and little FX.
  • About 27:30 in: some low-key stuff with woodwinds, some brass, harpsichord and that percussion instrument.
  • 24:40 in: some woodwinds and strings.
  • 32:38 in.
  • About 35:30 in.
  • About 38:35 in: some chase music followed by some quieter stuff with woodwinds and timpani. Picks back up after the commercial break.
  • Also features a different pre-end credits piece.

    My main grip about the score is the odd use of a harpsichord for Indians. But not only that, half the time it's this old-fashioned melodramatic use that dates the score and doesn't work in the episode.

    Having said that, the score is different enough and enjoyable enough to warrant a deserved second tier effort. A night and day comparison to his first effort for the series.

    A good episode. It has its flaws though.




    "Malachi"
    By: Morton Stevens
    Suite: http//www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-lrBF0XQhA (about 85% of the episode score)
    EDIT: The suite, as of early 2018, has been BLOCKED by Youtube/Google. Sorry.

    A good score featuring fretless electric guitar, guitar and timpani. It's playful at times.
    Also has a Leonard Rosenman tone pyramid. Yes, I know he didn't invent the damn thing, but he's famous for it in the score community.




    "South Wind"
    By: Tommy Morgan
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bA27WbJeJro

    Highlights:
  • Nothing.

    Thankfully light on the use of a harmonica.




    "Hostage"
    By: Harry Geller
    Suite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xoZENAALoQ (short selections)

    I remembered it being a good score and noted that on my list, but this was all I could get from it without a lot of SFX.




    "Outlaw's Woman"
    By: Harry Geller
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOW-eidm4jo

    Highlights:
  • 0:58 in.
  • 14:22 in.
  • 24:41 in.
  • 35:41 in.
  • 46:18 in.

    A poor episode.

    Kitty: "Anything else?"
    Doc: "Um, y-yes, ah, I, um, I need something, ah--"
    Kitty: "It's something like a beer?"
    Doc: "Yes, something like the beer."
    Kitty: "Ah huh. Ah, Sam..."
    Doc: "You're amazing."




    "Sweet Billy, Singer of Songs"
    By: Richard Shores
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ah-FLNjfbAY

    Highlights:
  • 14:17 in: a nice short piece with clarinet and xylophone. Goes into a piece with acoustic guitar and harmonica.
  • 41:30 in: some light-hearted chase music, stylistically different from previous episode scores. Maybe close to the episode score "Elib's Aim".
  • 44:17 in: a solo contra bassoon opens this cue, then goes into some more light-hearted chase music.

    A mediocre episode.

    More relatives of Festus show up, wanting help getting women. If Festus doesn't, they'll claim the hangy-down bit of Festus' ear that Elib tried to get episodes ago.

    Special mention of actress Brooke Bundy, who is cute. You can catch her at 10:00 in.




    "The Raid: Part I"
    By: Franz Waxman
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrxzOZk7fT4

    Waxman's first effort for the series. Well, and second since it's a two-parter.

    It actually has the episode name on screen.

    Highlights:
  • 0:29 in. A long cue, at nearly four minutes.
  • 26:13 in.
  • 28:57 in.


    "The Raid: Part II"
    By: Franz Waxman
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t46_2hiKlKw

    Highlights:
  • 4:57 in: the first cue of the episode.
  • 12:58 in.
  • About 15:20 in: some violins and woodwinds (I think I hear a flute harmonizing with the strings).
  • About 16:06 in.
  • About 25:25 in. Yet another statement of the series' theme. Third one so far, but they're all short.
  • About 28:15 in. There's a lull of a few seconds and the music goes out to the commercial break.
  • About 30:15 in. Some hard detache strings with timpani hits, with the series' theme playing over it.
  • 38:03 in.
  • 42:03.
  • 46:35 in.

    I guess I'd say it was a good two-parter.




    That's it for today. Tomorrow more returning names including the third and final Waxman effort (people think he only did two) and closing out season eleven. Since I removed Klatzkin efforts and ones where Stevens' is credited as a music supervisor, the season ended more quickly.

  •  
     
     Posted:   Sep 9, 2017 - 4:41 AM   
     By:   (Member)   (Member)


    "The Raid: Part I"
    By: Franz Waxman
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrxzOZk7fT4

    Waxman's first effort for the series. Well, and second since it's a two-parter.

    It actually has the episode name on screen.

    Highlights:
  • 0:29 in. A long cue, at nearly four minutes.
  • 26:13 in.
  • 28:57 in.


    "The Raid: Part II"
    By: Franz Waxman
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t46_2hiKlKw

    Highlights:
  • 4:57 in: the first cue of the episode.
  • 12:58 in.
  • About 15:20 in: some violins and woodwinds (I think I hear a flute harmonizing with the strings).
  • About 16:06 in.
  • About 25:25 in. Yet another statement of the series' theme. Third one so far, but they're all short.
  • About 28:15 in. There's a lull of a few seconds and the music goes out to the commercial break.
  • About 30:15 in. Some hard detache strings with timpani hits, with the series' theme playing over it.
  • 38:03 in.
  • 42:03.
  • 46:35 in.

    I guess I'd say it was a good two-parter.




    I second your judgment on this episode which is a fine big store operation. The music sounds conducted by Morton Stevens.
    The score was released by The Film Music Society through the compilation Music from CBS Westerns.
    http://www.soundtrackcollector.com/catalog/soundtrackdetail.php?movieid=69873

  •  
     Posted:   Sep 9, 2017 - 10:29 AM   
     By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

    "Honor Before Justice"
    By: Lyn Murray
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FdBppGDjqk

    This is Murray's final effort for the series. He went out on a high note.

    Highlights:
  • 0:26 in.
  • About 3:15 in. Dominated by woodwinds and including a little harpsichord
  • 4:22 in.
  • 8:09 in.
  • 27:48 in.
  • About 34:50 in.
  • About 38:00 in.
  • About 47:00 in.
  • About 48:50 in.

    A rather good episode. A simple plot, but affective.

    I'm tempted to give this score a top tier spot, but for now I'll just say it's a second tier effort. A fine low-key effort, worthy of a complete score release.

    Another cute actress to note: France Nuyen.




    "The Brothers"
    By: Franz Waxman
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2eoksNfL7A

    Waxman's final effort for the series. Another bank robbery episode.

    Highlights:
  • 0:23 in.
  • 5:02 in.
  • About 10:58 in: some quiet menacing brass, trembling strings, and piano.
  • About 12:15 in. Unfortunately, I guess Waxman was a little lazy, and he re-used action material from "The Raid".
  • About 16:33 in: more quiet brass, a little menacing, with low piano rumbling.
  • 18:56 in.
  • 30:55 in.
  • 37:31 in.

    A mediocre episode.

    Festus: "Id just like to see those yayhoozs on the other end of my rifle." (phonetic way of spelling how Festus says it)




    "Harvest"
    By: Harry Zimmerman and Willis H. Schaefer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4fd2RuvQRw

    This is the only effort for the series by either composer.

    Highlights:
  • 0:28 in: includes some Scottish-sounding material since a Scottish family is in this episode.
  • 10:10 in.
  • 14:53 in: opens with a good riffs on the series' theme music.
  • 17:27 in: woodwinds open the episode, then it changes to guitar strums with harmonica.
  • 25:44 in. Woodwinds with some quick guitar strums open the cue, which again features harmonica (with some strings this time).
  • 33:08 in: brass and timpani for fight music.
  • 41:56 in: about three minutes of action material.
  • 46:53 in. About three minutes. Closes out the episode.

    An okay episode.

    Another example of something you could never do to actors these days: a fireball blows up right on three actors. They don't catch fire luckily.

    Doc: "You'd like another beer?"
    Festus: "Yeah!"
    Doc: "Good -- then go on in there and buy one for a change."




    And that concludes season eleven.

  •  
     Posted:   Sep 9, 2017 - 1:04 PM   
     By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

    SEASON 12:

    The series is now in color. The opening has been re-filmed and the music re-done. The opening credits as been re-recorded as well.

    In real life James Arness, who played Matt Dillon, became an alcoholic. It was easy to spot. It was easy to spot, I believe around season eight you could see his acting declined and he was done to brief lines and a face that looked like he was drunk, including a booze nose. In black and white that was more apparent, now in color you can see how haggard the drinking had been on him.




    "Snap Decision"
    By: Richard Shores
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96kj7rrmbZc

    Highlights:
  • About 9:48 in: woodwinds and some cellos for a mournful sound.
  • 28:32 in.
  • 34:54 in.

    An okay episode. the load was incomplete and I didn't realize it. Rather than find one that was and throw off the time indexes, I stuck with this.

    Actor Claude Akins is back, yet again playing another character.

    This may be the only episode where Doc paid for something instead of Matt or Festus.




    "The Jailer"
    By: Morton Stevens
    Suite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IizShoLl8j8

    A good score with low-key material.




    "The Mission"
    By: Fred Steiner
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmqggyMpVDo

    This is Steiner's final effort for the series. I would have rathered they kept Steiner. His efforts were certainly better than Hatch's, yet Hatch isn't done yet.

    Highlights:
  • 0:24 in.
  • 17:37 in.
  • About 26:10 in.
  • Somewhere after 32:00 in. And the cue right after the commercial break.
  • 38:07 in. Another cue badly edited into a previous one.
  • About 40:10 in.




    "Gunfighter, R.I.P"
    By: Ernest Gold
    Suite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_z4IbYst2Do

    This is Gold's only effort for the series.

    A good score. I'm tempted to put it in a top tier place.




    "Wrong Man"
    By: Irwin Kostal
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dhbte5eBNkI

    This is Kostal's only effort for the series.

    Highlights:
  • About 4:20 in: a slow piece with acoustic guitar and harmonica. Some brass joins in around the end.
  • The next cue, right after the above, after the commercial break.
  • About 8:30 in.
  • About 24:35 in.
  • About 32:50 in.
  • 36:32: a weird-sounding short cue.
  • About 37:40 in.
  • About 39:38 in.

    The late Carroll O'Connor guest stars.

    I thought the score was kind of Herrmann-esque. It's a shame Kostal didn't do any others.

    A borderline second tier effort. It's kind it's own flavor and way about it and it's a refreshing difference. I don't think I heard a cue not worth a release, so a complete release might be in order.




    That's it for today. Tomorrow: Goldsmith, Stevens, and Harline -- oh my!

  •  
     Posted:   Sep 9, 2017 - 1:33 PM   
     By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

    God those later seasons are terrible, even if they did have some good original scores.
    Festus, pheh!!!!!!!!
    b

     
     Posted:   Sep 9, 2017 - 1:37 PM   
     By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)


    In real life James Arness, who played Matt Dillon, became an alcoholic. It was easy to spot. It was easy to spot, I believe around season eight you could see his acting declined and he was done to brief lines and a face that looked like he was drunk, including a booze nose. In black and white that was more apparent, now in color you can see how haggard the drinking had been on him.

    Didn't know that.

    Ever notice how many times he says "Now let me tell you something mister..."
    I always assumed he forgot his lines and used that line to buy time. It certainly wasn't scripted.
    Him and John Wayne; drinking buddies, mediocre actors; right wingers>
    wink

     
     Posted:   Sep 9, 2017 - 1:39 PM   
     By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

    Hey Justin and member;

    how many eps used the same plot of Matt and -------forced to make a trek across the dessert without horses and water?

     
     Posted:   Sep 9, 2017 - 1:48 PM   
     By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

    "The Raid" two-parter is the only one I know off hand that fits that. There's been others where he ran out of water, like the two-parter "Waste".

     
     Posted:   Sep 10, 2017 - 2:02 PM   
     By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

    "Whispering Tree"
    By: Jerry Goldsmith

    This is Goldsmith's final effort for the series.

    The complete score:
    Suite #1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjoE8tiLeKs
    Suite #2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PiYdxZcDHqs

    In my opinion, probably Goldsmith's best work on the series. Deserving of a full release.




    "Quaker Girl"
    By: Leigh Harline
    New link as of January 31, 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vcsYNUJuMZg

    This is Harline's only effort for the series.

    Highlights:
  • 30:07 in.
  • 32:48 in.

    A good episode. The actor who plays Thad isn't that good an actor that, and he gets overshadowed by Shatner of all people.

    Guest starring William Shatner.

    A good score. I know I only mentioned two examples, but the episode was score heavy and highlights were often inside long stretches in the first half.




    "Moonstone"
    By: Morton Stevens
    New link as of January 31, 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFCz14mvwn0

    Highlights:
  • 1:40 in.
  • 19:21 in: begins with a moody bass cello and a little steel xylophone, shifting to some strings and woodwinds with a little bit of harmonica.
  • 23:32 in.
  • 25:25 in: picking up from where the above cue left off. A couple second of silence and you could combine the cues without any evil crossfading.
  • 34:40 in.
  • 41:15 in. Closes out the episode, and with a Rosenman tone pyramid.

    I guess it was a good episode.




    That's it for today. Monday, if I can get online (I'm in a tropical storm warning section from Irma), expect to close out season twelve with more Stevens, another Geller, and two one-shot composers.

  •  
     
     Posted:   Sep 10, 2017 - 3:30 PM   
     By:   (Member)   (Member)

    "The Jailer"
    By: Morton Stevens
    Suite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IizShoLl8j8

    A good score with low-key material.


    I concur. It's really a good score that reminds me Thriller.

     
     
     Posted:   Sep 11, 2017 - 4:50 AM   
     By:   (Member)   (Member)


    "The Raid: Part I"
    By: Franz Waxman
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrxzOZk7fT4

    Waxman's first effort for the series. Well, and second since it's a two-parter.

    It actually has the episode name on screen.

    Highlights:
  • 0:29 in. A long cue, at nearly four minutes.
  • 26:13 in.
  • 28:57 in.


    "The Raid: Part II"
    By: Franz Waxman
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t46_2hiKlKw

    Highlights:
  • 4:57 in: the first cue of the episode.
  • 12:58 in.
  • About 15:20 in: some violins and woodwinds (I think I hear a flute harmonizing with the strings).
  • About 16:06 in.
  • About 25:25 in. Yet another statement of the series' theme. Third one so far, but they're all short.
  • About 28:15 in. There's a lull of a few seconds and the music goes out to the commercial break.
  • About 30:15 in. Some hard detache strings with timpani hits, with the series' theme playing over it.
  • 38:03 in.
  • 42:03.
  • 46:35 in.

    I guess I'd say it was a good two-parter.




    I second your judgment on this episode which is a fine big store operation. The music sounds conducted by Morton Stevens.
    The score was released by The Film Music Society through the compilation Music from CBS Westerns.
    http://www.soundtrackcollector.com/catalog/soundtrackdetail.php?movieid=69873




    I'd like to add that actor Gary Lockwood does a fine performance as the diehard gang leader.
    Furthermore, the ensemble of actors that play the gang members is fabulous:

    John Anderson as the town's infiltrator
    John Kellogg
    Dee Pollock
    Jeremy Slate
    Jim Davis
    Richard Jaeckel
    Michael Conrad

  •  
     Posted:   Sep 12, 2017 - 12:02 PM   
     By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

    "Mad Dog"
    By: Harry Geller
    New link as of January 31, 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4yYukEuTxI

    I noted on my list of episode scores "Aimless score that sounded like random library cues", so we'll see how this goes.....

    Highlights:
  • 0:22 in. The first cue.
  • 33:40 in.

    An okay episode.

    In a series first, Geller has breif brass bursts for punches, like the 1960's "Batman" series. The show had come on the same year, so it probably inspired the choice.

    Festus: "A man with an outfit like this could have a parade all by himself."




    "Muley"
    By: Morton Stevens
    New link as of January 31, 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRtgghYskE8

    Highlights:
  • 0:26: a timpani beat, with some guitar plucking and low harmonica leading up for Matt getting it.
  • 2:13 in: what sounds liek a wooden xylaphone, with the low menacing harmonicas and various colors.
  • 25:54 in.
  • About 37:15 in.

    An okay episode.

    A second tier effort.




    "The Lure"
    By: Philip Springer
    New link as of January 31, 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7W6uMZR2nhY

    This is Springer's only effort for the series.

    Highlights:
  • 11:12 in.
  • About 21:00 in: an acoustic guitar with a solo flute playing over it.
  • 24:55 in. I swear I've heard this before in another episode. Maybe a tracked piece.
  • About 31:55 in.
  • 35:45 in.

    A mediocre episode.

    I can hear why he wasn't asked back. It was too light and at tiems seemed at odds with the on-screen happenings.




    "Noose of Gold"
    By: Jack Pleis
    New link as of January 31, 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OulI5aDbo0g

    This is Pleis' only effort for the series.

    Highlights:
  • About 10:40 in.
  • 17:45 in.
  • 21:27 in.
  • 19:25 in.

    A mediocre episode.

    Pleis did a better job than Springer, but it was still a little lackluster.




    "Ladies from St. Louis"
    By: Morton Stevens
    New link as of January 31, 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gop9PD8OqUs

    Highlights:
  • 6:35 in.
  • 10:42 in.
  • 13:13 in.
  • 14:10 in.
  • 13:53 in.
  • 22:37 in. More of the playful material for Festus helping the nuns.
  • 28:58 in.
  • 41:59 in. And this cue closes out the episode.

    An okay episode.

    Claude Akins guest stars again as another character.

    A second tier effort from Stevens. I mentioned almost every cue in the episode.




    And that concludes season twelve.

    Removing Klatzkin efforts and episodes where Stevens is credited as a music supervisor, the next season will only have ten episodes score to review.

    More Stevens and Geller up next.

  •  
     
     Posted:   Sep 12, 2017 - 1:50 PM   
     By:   (Member)   (Member)

    "Noose of Gold"
    By: Jack Pleis
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7TbK6ru_un4

    Some of the arrangements remind the season 2 “The Night of the Tartar” from "The Wild Wild West”.
    It's less expressive than the West score.

     
     Posted:   Sep 12, 2017 - 2:02 PM   
     By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

    SEASON 13:

    The opening pre-credits music has been re-recorded again. This is supposed to be the season Morton Stevens did the new theme arrangement, so maybe he handled it all.

    I don't care so much for the opening credits, but I like the new end credits arrangement.




    "Cattle Barons"
    By: Morton Stevens
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYMataq9P9s

    Highlights:
  • 0:29 in: some rousing western music (influenced by Bernstein?).
  • 1:23 in: some thrilling fast-paced brass. Also includes a Rosenman tone pyramid. More at 4:13 in.
  • About 11:20 in: some low brass and a snare drum rolls.
  • 16:35 in: a French horn playing over some more brass and some staccato woodwinds, with some snare drum.
  • Somewhere around 31:00 in.
  • 38:14 in: light-hearted fight music with some banjo.

    A rather poor episode. It's safe to say this is a waste of your life to watch.

    While there was some excellent material in there to warrant a top tier effort spot, there wasn't overall enough to keep it there. I have to make this a second tier effort.

    Festus: "Anything happens to Matthew out yonder, you better make sure that I'm stretched out right besides him 'cause if I ain't, I'll gonna get on you like thunder after lightning. I'll take an oath on that."




    "A Hat"
    By: Harry Geller
    Suite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgA5AP5O3mY&hl

    A good score. It's simple yet effective. I want to give it a second tier spot.

    I seem to recall the episode was good. A man goes on a rampage after a brawl with gunfire puts a hole in this hat. It's got a funny line in the end.




    "Major Glory"
    By: Morton Stevens (Emmy-nominated)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXXdbGlaJEg

    This is his second and final nomination for the series. Stevens and the other nominees lost out that year to:
    Earle Hagen for an episode of "I Spy" titled "Laya".

    It's rather surprisingly, but looking at the Awards section for the show on IMDb, there were no other episode scores nominated besides these two Stevens scores.

    Highlights:
  • About 15:20 in. Picks back up after the commercial break. Contains some riffs on the "Battle Hymn of the Republic" and some Rosenman tone pyramids.
  • About 23:20 in.
  • About 27:00 in.
  • About 33:10 in. It's a long cue and goes on for over two minutes.
  • 36:25 in: more staccato brass and even some triangle.
  • About 38:25 in.

    An okay episode.

    Carroll O'Connor is back again guest starring, playing another character.

    I'm not certain overall I want to give it a top tier effort spot, so I'll just go with a second tier spot.




    "Prairie Wolfer"
    By: Harry Geller
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlOyHGpc1oM

    Highlights:
  • About 0:32 in.
  • About 26:50 in.
  • About 37:25 in. Includes a Rosenman tone pyramid.
  • About 40:30 in.

    A borderline good episode.

    Festus has been given a badge. I guess he's officially now working for Matt.




    That's it for today. Tomorrow another Stevens, a one-shot composer, and we finally arrived at John Parker.

  •  
     
     Posted:   Sep 13, 2017 - 12:46 AM   
     By:   (Member)   (Member)

    Morton Stevens is really the added value of Gunsmoke because his scores are very exciting and effective to listen to. I enjoy the way he uses brass to create an ominous atmosphere.

    "Cattle Barons" has some hectic fox hunting music to start with. The cue at 31:00 was tracked in "The Night of the Montezuma's Hordes" and "The Night of the Vipers". That means that the Stevens credits for "The Night of the Vipers" consists of his season 13 Gunsmoke scores: "Cattle Barons" and "Major Glory".

    Thank you Justin for this amazing work of dissection.

    Season 13 interests me very much because I try to track down the stock music for The Wild Wild West.

     
     Posted:   Sep 13, 2017 - 6:30 PM   
     By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

    "Wonder"
    By: Morton Stevens
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NcZ0RGlvrB8

    Highlights:
  • 5:06 in.
  • About 11:00 in: a touching piece with acoustic guitar, xylophone and some woodwinds.
  • 16:20 in.
  • 37:28 in.

    A good episode.

    A second tier effort from Stevens.




    "Baker's Dozen"
    By: Johnny Parker
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRL2bvn0ZM8
    Two cues ripped from the episode: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1hAv-Stvc8

    This is Parker's first effort for the series.

    Highlights:
  • 2:00 in: the brief pretty cue.
  • 7:38 in: another very short but pretty cue, leading out to a commercial break.
  • 10:05 in: more pretty music.
  • 14:45 in. More at 18:47 in.
  • 40:15 in: a more warm variant of the theme for this episode. It closes out the episode.

    Parker told me in an e-mail, before he dropped off the face of the Earth and nobody can apparently reach him now, that when the producers (or a specific producer -- I don't recall) heard the music, one of them cried at how pretty it was.

    Perhaps I am a little biased because I generally love Parker's work, but I have to put this in a top tier spot. It deserves a complete release, even the short little transition cues I didn't mention.

    Kitty: "Some people just have an unlimited capacity for love."




    "Nowhere To Run"
    By: Allyn Ferguson
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-oXxEn6zAn0

    This is Ferguson's only effort for the series.

    Highlights:
  • About 5:40 in.
  • 25:40 in.
  • 30:26 in
  • 31:10 in.
  • 42:37 in: a playful outro cue that closes the episode.

    An okay episode.

    There's really nothing wrong with Ferguson's score. I don't see why he wasn't invited back, especially considering some of his other work which is quite good.

    Matt: "How about some breakfast? I'm buyin'."
    Festus: "I'm ready."




    "Blood Money"
    By: Johnny Parker
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPub3hLvW3w

    Another episode that has the same title as an older one.

    Highlights:
  • About 1:40 in.
  • About 3:50 in.
  • About 12:40 in.
  • 20:30 in.
  • About 36:50 in.

    A very mediocre episode.

    Papa: "There is shame if you can do better but you won't! There is shame when you turn your back on a dream!"




    "The First People"
    By: Johnny Parker
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26cNRjy_9M4

    Highlights:
  • About 2:21 in.
  • 4:45 in.
  • 13:42 in.
  • 15:58 in: some low-key stuff with timpani and wooden xylophone. Some little brass thrown in here and there. It's a long cue at nearly five minutes. Some action around the end.
  • 26:21 in.
  • 28:51 in: a lone French horn plays part of the series' theme as Matt removes his badge. Some more brass and some string join in the end. A short cue.
  • About 33:08 in.

    A mediocre episode.

    Jack Elam is back, playing yet another character. Hard to miss him, since whatever character he plays, he still has those freaky unkempt eyebrows and one eye that looks another way. Looking over his IMDb page, he was in a lot of westerns. His last acting credit on there is for a Bonanza TV movie.

    Festus has stepped up in the world. With Matt injured, Festus has to take over and has become acting sheriff of Dodge.

    Festus: "Now you listen here, mister sassy mouth..."




    "Mr. Sam'l"
    By: Johnny Parker
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a42CJveT8oU

    Highlights:
  • About 3:00 in: the theme for Mr. Sam'l.
  • About 7:03 in: more of the character's theme.
  • About 26:30 in.
  • 30:07 in.
  • 32:27 and 34:33: essentially one cue; the build up and then the get'a'goin' (in Festus speak). 37:32 in is like the conclusion.
  • 42:10 in: one more statement of the theme to close out the episode.

    A very mediocre episode.

    Matt says he's been marshal of the town for thirteen years. This is another example of how the series can't keep it's own previously-stated facts straight. He's been there longer than that per dialogue from passed episodes. The years also jump around on the show.

    I guess this is a third-tier effort from Parker.




    And that concludes season thirteen. One more today, coming up soon.

    Season fourteen will be very short with the Klatzkin efforts removed (only seven titles). Well, tomorrow you will actually see his name twice in the reviews, one because I marked it as a decent score and the other because he's co-credited with another composer for some reason. Probably one or two more later as well.




    It's ben quite a big hurdle reviewing so many episode scores. It looks like there's about a month and a half or two months left and then I'll be about done (and only seven more composers who've not been mentioned yet). Well, I'll be done with "Gunsmoke", but there are still things to talk about, believe it or not.....

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