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 Posted:   May 29, 2023 - 7:35 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

I was playing The Pebble and the Penguin and the score by Mark Watters is fantastic. Very much in the John Williams style. I honestly didn't know him by name and thought Robert Folk composed the score. I recall All Dogs Go To Heaven 2 was quit good as well. It appears most of his work was for home video and television. I don't imagine much of his music was released commercially. It's a shame he didn't get more movie gigs.

 
 
 Posted:   May 29, 2023 - 4:16 PM   
 By:   podres185   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith....I mean, you hardly hear him mentioned around these parts.

More seriously, I would say Jarre is "underrated", or less appreciated on this forum for some reason.


I wholeheartedly agree. His electronic phase/period didn't produce much of any interest, but at his best he was a creative giant. In a single year -- 1966 -- he gave us three monumental film-music works in a row: "Grand Prix," "Is Paris Burning?" and "The Professionals." And all of that came on the heels of "Doctor Zhivago," another great work rendered less effective than it might have been without director David Lean's overuse of one theme.

 
 
 Posted:   May 29, 2023 - 9:39 PM   
 By:   Don Norman   (Member)

Hummie Mann

Craig Safan

Craig Armstrong

 
 
 Posted:   May 29, 2023 - 9:58 PM   
 By:   Tobias   (Member)

Joel Goldsmith is the first name that I think of. He has done a lot of good and even great stuff that is still unreleased and because of that a lot of people only think of his Stargate TV scores. But he has done so much more than that.

 
 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 2:25 AM   
 By:   knisper.shayan   (Member)


nick bicat

 
 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 9:18 AM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

Roy Webb

A couple compilation CD’s. No complete scores.

 
 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 9:36 AM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

Fun topic. All depends on your criteria. What constitutes underrated? Maurice Jarre? My first though is that it's difficult to consider a composer of his stature with 3 Oscars underrated, but compared to the attention given to some other silver-age composers, perhaps he is.

I'm all in on Maurice Jarre, and we're fortunate that so much of his output has been released.

Curiously, I was in Paris for a week last fall and somehow snuck in visits to a couple of record stores and was expecting some surprising Jarre finds, but I didn't. One of the drawbacks to the internet, I guess.

 
 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 11:17 AM   
 By:   Broughtfan   (Member)

I would go more with under-utilized rather than underated. Add to the list Bill Conti, who I feel is a very talented film music composer. Yes, he won the Oscar for The Right Stuff, but, in addition to this and all the Rocky films he did (Rocky Balboa was, I thought, terrific) he wrote fine scores for F/X, The Big Blue (US version), The Big Fix, F.I.S.T, Five Days From Home, Gotcha, The Karate Kid and, of course, some memorable TV themes: Dynasty, The Colbys, Falcon Crest (including a superb pilot score), Cagney and Lacey, Emerald Point, NAS. I don’t know the score for Masters of the Universe well but am looking forward to checking out his work on it (as many claim it’s one of his best).

He’s also a heck of a nice man, as I discovered when I met him after a 1986 guest conducting appearance he did with the LSO in Daytona Beach.

Another name I’ll put forth is Arthur Morton, mostly known as an orchestrator to the likes of George Dunning and Jerry Goldsmith, his scores for The Waltons were top-class, three that come to mind being The Journey (in which John Boy drives a dying woman to the beach) The Minstrel and The Air Mail Man.

 
 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 11:17 AM   
 By:   tiomkinfan   (Member)

Definitely Roy Webb. Also:
Edward Ward
Paul J smith
Oliver Wallace

 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 12:13 PM   
 By:   robertmro   (Member)

Fun topic. All depends on your criteria. What constitutes underrated? Maurice Jarre? My first though is that it's difficult to consider a composer of his stature with 3 Oscars underrated, but compared to the attention given to some other silver-age composers, perhaps he is.

I'm all in on Maurice Jarre, and we're fortunate that so much of his output has been released.

Curiously, I was in Paris for a week last fall and somehow snuck in visits to a couple of record stores and was expecting some surprising Jarre finds, but I didn't. One of the drawbacks to the internet, I guess.


I have to agree but you have to keep in mind that the prevailing trends on this forum are formed by a very obsessive group of collectors led by individuals who are convinced of their infallible taste and judgment. It’s a very distorted view of a film music. If you’re old enough to remember when Charles Gerhardt started his film music series Max Steiner was held in high esteem. If you go by the conventional wisdom here now he’s too loud. I fully understand that tastes change and music evolves. I think it’s already starting to show.

I’d be very surprised if Maurice Jarre achieved cult status now but who knows. His scores that I listen to I love and his was fortunate to have his music associated with some of the most iconic film of all time and he wrote the right music for them. So to be honest I wouldn’t say that he’s underrated because he’s full appreciated by the film music fans who aren’t constantly posting here. Besides hero worship looks silly from the outside.

 
 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 1:25 PM   
 By:   Doc Loch   (Member)

Interesting that a generation (or two) raised on hearing the drum machines kick in every time there's a fight or chase scene now considers Max Steiner too loud.

 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 1:43 PM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)


Instead of watching a STAR TREK episode for the umpteenth time, go rent or download a Polish film from 1960, for instance.


Pauses.

Thinks about it carefully....



Nah.

 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   Lokutus   (Member)

2) Zdenek Liska: Here's a man who has scored more than 120 films.

Just curious where you came up with that number? Since he scored also a ton of TV productions, documentaries and short films and was Morricone-kind of busy during most of his career you might want to tripple it to get at least a bit closer the the correct number of films he scored.

For more complete filmography of his you might want to look at:
https://www.csfd.cz/tvurce/48830-zdenek-liska/prehled/



But agree that amount of his music available is ridiculous... but we can thank to that bitch his widow for it.

 
 
 Posted:   May 30, 2023 - 2:22 PM   
 By:   townerbarry   (Member)

It has to be Johnny T. Williams

The last time Johnny T…Won an Oscar was 1993!

That is 30 Years of Underrated!

Underrated

 
 
 Posted:   May 31, 2023 - 6:30 AM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

Regarding Steiner's rep from the 70s to present time, I can only say what my view is,

After growing up on the great composers of the 60s during my teen years I started getting into the golden age composers when Gerhardt started his series and Elmer Bernstein started his club and Herrmann started re-recording his scores. I started to appreciate Waxman, Herrmann, North, Walton, and a couple of others. But not Steiner. Not because he was loud, because I just didn't connect with his music, even when he scored some of my favorite films--The Big Sleep, Casablanca.

Almost 50 years later my thoughts on Max haven't changed. I still cringe when I watch The Big Sleep and his music comes in.

I know the score was high on the kickstarter list, but I just don't get it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 1, 2023 - 12:16 AM   
 By:   The Shadow   (Member)

deleted

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 1, 2023 - 5:19 AM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

Stanley Myers.

He composed film scores in parts of four decades--mid-sixties into the early nineties and was in the middle of Middlemarch when he died.

He always knew how to adapt. In the 60s he captured swinging London with Kaleidescope, offered a variety of styles for Ulysses, delved into the split personalities of a serial killer in No Way to Treat a Lady, and introduced guitarist John Williams to the film world with his sensitive master scoring of a Raging Moon.

He was requested to adapt his non-film piece "Cavatina" for The Deer Hunter and achieved what few film composers ever have--a stand alone classic that has been recorded and performed by countless classical guitarists.

He worked extensively with many of the best directors and mentored several young composers--Richard Harvey and Hans Zimmer and I think there were more.

While there are several CDs of his music available there are far too many of his better scores never released on CD: A Raging Moon, No Way to Treat a Lady, Otley, and Ulysses for starters.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 1, 2023 - 5:29 AM   
 By:   Broughtfan   (Member)

No film composers only but multimedia composers better I would say (feature film, TV shows, video games) since there are/were all meaned or might be (avail)able to do feature films as well...

In first name alphabetical order:

BEN FOSTER
BILL BROWN
BILLY GOLDENBERG
DAVE GRUSIN
DAVID SHIRE
DOMINIC FRONTIERE
DON COSTA
ERNIE FREEMAN
FRED KARLIN
FREDERIC TALGORN
GEORGES GARVARENTZ
GERALD FRIED
GIL MELLE
GORDY HAAB
HUGO MONTENEGRO
JAMES HANNIGAN
JAMES SEYMOUR BRETT
JERROLD IMMEL
JJ JOHNSON
JOE KRAMER
JOHN CACAVAS
JOHN SCOTT
KEN THORNE
KEN WANNBERG
LEE HOLDRIDGE
LUCHI DE JESUS
MICHAEL J LEWIS
MICHAEL SMALL
MORTON STEVENS
OLIVER NELSON
PATRICK WILLIAMS
PETE RUGOLO
PETER BERNSTEIN
PHILIPPE ROMBI
RANDY MILLER
ROBERT DRASNIN
ROBERT FOLK
ROBERT O.RAGLAND
ROBERT PRINCE
ROY BUDD
WILBERT ROGET II


Absolutely agree about Ken Wannberg, who, IMO, did a knockout job on the Canadian thriller "The Silent Partner" (which I just saw this past weekend), interpolating Oscar Peterson's thematic material into his very suspenseful underscore. I think he was very talented and could have had much more of a feature film composing career.

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2023 - 10:46 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Roy Webb

This will always be my #1 answer. Webb usually displayed a subtlety and restraint that was far ahead of its time in Golden Age Hollywood, even though he was one of the older Golden Age composers (only a year younger than Gottfried Huppertz, who of course started with several prominent scores during the Silent era!)

And yet, when the occasion called for it (SINBAD THE SAILOR, my favorite score of his!) he demonstrated that he could write epic orchestral thematic seafaring adventure music with the best of them! I especially cherish the 5.5 minute suite included on that Cloud Nine Records release of original Roy Webb tracks, but I want MORE darnit and a complete new recording of that wonderful score is perhaps my biggest Holy Grail, even over any unreleased Goldsmith music!

A couple compilation CD’s. No complete scores.

I know it was brief, but was Intrada's release of Fixed Bayonets not the complete score? I do know that Branded, on the LLL Paramount Westerns set, was only the small surviving fragment (5.5 minutes, again) of a longer full score.

How much original music did Webb compose for Mighty Joe Young, out of curiosity? This album has 35 minutes (re-recorded) from his score, which I believe is the most substantial release lengthwise of any of his film scores:
http://www.mmmrecordings.com/MJY/mjy.html

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2023 - 11:46 AM   
 By:   moolik   (Member)

Roy Webb

 
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