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 Posted:   Feb 22, 2022 - 11:07 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Feb 23, 2022 - 12:33 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

I'm no fan of Virgil Thompson's music, the film music that is.

I have the Hyperion CD with some of his film score suites on it (that's all of his oeuvre I've ever acquired for my collection decades ago), but I never really got into this music. I don't say it's bad music, not at all. It's just not my kind of sound - and the examples Hurwitz plays, don't do a thing for me.

It was with some kind of satisfaction, when I've read a David Raksin interview where Raksin told the journalist he didn't like Virgil Thompson's music either.

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2022 - 11:09 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2022 - 5:29 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

"These superb performances from the PostClassical Ensemble under Angel Gil-Ordóñez feature important film music by Silvestre Revueltas and Aaron Copland. Both last just over half and hour, and perfectly complement the subjects. Naxos has also released remastered versions of the actual films with the new soundtracks added, but for most listeners I suspect having just the music will offer the ideal listening experience.
Musical Examples courtesy of Naxos Records"

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2022 - 5:29 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

Redes (Suite)




The SCM Symphony Orchestra conducted by Maestro Eduardo Diazmuñoz perform Silvestre Revueltas's Redes.

23 August, 2014
Verbrugghen Hall

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2022 - 5:30 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

I wonder how much of an influence Fred Zinnemann, the co-director of Redes, had on how the music was used in this film?


The chosen piece of music from The City is wonderful - Philip Glass learned a great deal from Copland.

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2022 - 7:20 AM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

Review: A Hidden Gem from Peter Maag--Malipiero Orchestral Works





"This delightful Naxos disc contains outstanding orchestral music by Italian composer Gian Francesco Malipiero (1883-1973), a contemporary of Respighi and one of the great Italian composers in the decades just before and immediately following World War II. It's also one of hidden delights in the Peter Maag discography, a conductor with a sterling reputation whose representation on disc is relatively sparse. So kudos to Naxos for snagging this musical treasure. You'll certainly want to hear it.
Musical Example courtesy of Naxos Records"

The presented CD also contains film music from "Steel" (Italian: Acciaio), a 1933 Italian drama film directed by Walter Ruttmann and starring Piero Pastore, Isa Pola and Vittorio Bellaccini. The film was shot on location at the steel mills in Terni in Umbria. It was based on the novel Giuoca, Pietro! by Luigi Pirandello. With its semi-documentary style it was one of a number of films made in the Fascist era that serve as a precursor to Italian neorealism.

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2022 - 8:17 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I like the Malipiero concert works I've heard, but I had no idea he'd written for film!

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2022 - 9:26 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

{Nevermind}

 
 Posted:   May 19, 2022 - 9:58 AM   
 By:   mistermike   (Member)

Posted by Hurwitz in the "community" section of his YouTube site a couple of weeks ago:

Hello friends. I wanted to share with you information about a new feature added to my channel that I just learned about. It's called "Super Thanks," for some reason. From what I can gather, it seems to function kind of like the tip you give a garage attendant when he delivers your car to you. Located at the bottom of the video you will find a "Thanks" button. If you click on it, it allows you to toss a few bucks (from $2 to $50) to the creator of the video, presuming you really like it. It's a 70/30 split with YouTube (happily, they get the 30). In addition, you get a highlighted special comment (assuming I don't delete it, of course) and some other bells and whistles.

Frankly, I am of two minds about this functionality. I do believe that although these videos are totally free (ClassicsToday special subscriber features aside), it's good to be able to at least try to earn a living doing this. I definitely see this as the wave of the future. On the other hand, no one should see this as some sort of obligation, I don't want to have to promote it, and above all, I don't want my channel to become "money driven"--that is, I want to continue to highlight stuff that I think is great and important for purely musical reasons, and not because it generates the most revenue. But it's there, and I wanted you to know what my position is. Do I think the channel deserves the support? Heck yeah! But it's not going to control what we do.

So keep on listening--there's some great stuff coming up, including the last complete Rachmaninoff box, the complete Franck orchestra works (some real surprises there), the Ancerl box on Supraphon, more Dave's Faves (got to get a few hundred of those in the can), and the much anticipated ideal Handel opera list (boy is that a project!).

Thank you all for your time, encouragement, comments, support, and now, gratuities!

 
 Posted:   May 19, 2022 - 1:33 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

mistermike, thanks for bumping this thread. I wasn't on David's channel for a while. Now, I see a new review that might be of larger interest to some here on the forum. I've asked him to do a review of Kilar's Dracula, and now, it's here. Enjoy (if you can).


Film Scores: Bram Stoker's Dracula (Kilar)



"Wojciech Kilar (d. 2013) was an important Polish composer of concert music as well as film scores. He's best known in the West for his superbly atmospheric music for Bram Stoker's Dracula, here superbly performed by native Polish forces under the always reliable baton of Antoni Wit. This is an essential disc for any film music collection.
Musical Example courtesy of Naxos Records"

 
 
 Posted:   May 19, 2022 - 1:52 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Posted by Hurwitz in the "community" section of his YouTube site a couple of weeks ago:

Hello friends. I wanted to share with you information about a new feature added to my channel that I just learned about. It's called "Super Thanks," for some reason. From what I can gather, it seems to function kind of like the tip you give a garage attendant when he delivers your car to you. Located at the bottom of the video you will find a "Thanks" button. If you click on it, it allows you to toss a few bucks (from $2 to $50) to the creator of the video, presuming you really like it. It's a 70/30 split with YouTube (happily, they get the 30). In addition, you get a highlighted special comment (assuming I don't delete it, of course) and some other bells and whistles.

Frankly, I am of two minds about this functionality. I do believe that although these videos are totally free (ClassicsToday special subscriber features aside), it's good to be able to at least try to earn a living doing this. I definitely see this as the wave of the future. On the other hand, no one should see this as some sort of obligation, I don't want to have to promote it, and above all, I don't want my channel to become "money driven"--that is, I want to continue to highlight stuff that I think is great and important for purely musical reasons, and not because it generates the most revenue. But it's there, and I wanted you to know what my position is. Do I think the channel deserves the support? Heck yeah! But it's not going to control what we do.

So keep on listening--there's some great stuff coming up, including the last complete Rachmaninoff box, the complete Franck orchestra works (some real surprises there), the Ancerl box on Supraphon, more Dave's Faves (got to get a few hundred of those in the can), and the much anticipated ideal Handel opera list (boy is that a project!).

Thank you all for your time, encouragement, comments, support, and now, gratuities!


It's always about money - the channel is monetized although I don't think he gets enough views for it to kick in. I'm awaiting his review of the incredible Dimitri Mitropoulos set, but he'll have to purchase it, so who knows when it will come. Maybe some who love these videos will send him some money immediately.

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2022 - 12:10 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

Happily, two new talks by David Hurwitz on film music: John Williams (again...?) and at long last, Jacques Ibert.

Rejoice, rejoice.


Review: Sony's John Williams Box Beats Decca's




"OK, I understand that 20 CDs of show tunes and film music experts may be too much of a good thing, but at least in this collection you get a couple of discs of John Williams directing his own concert music, plus a few welcome surprises in the "serious" music department. On the whole, I like this collection better than Decca's otherwise very similar Big Box, and I suspect you will too."



Film Scores: Macbeth; Golgotha; Don Quichotte (Jacques Ibert)



"Don't let this splendid disc, another marvelous Adriano production on Naxos, escape your notice. Jacques Ibert was a terrific film composer, and the music here has remarkable atmosphere plus a healthy dose of individuality. I mean, Jesus gets crucified to the accompaniment of an Ondes Martenot. What more could you want?
Musical Examples courtesy of Naxos Records"



You might also enjoy his "Korngold Surveys" Playlist containing ten videos so far:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0WNTH9Dytk&list=PLAjIX596BriF7vopYuFCKptXChvU7nChd

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2022 - 7:29 AM   
 By:   EdG   (Member)

Korngold's famed Violin Concerto:

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2022 - 1:18 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

One more coming:


Dave's Faves No. 130 (Waxman)



Franz Waxman: Classic Film Scores. National Philharmonic Orchestra, Charles Gerhardt (cond.) RCA

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2022 - 6:21 AM   
 By:   fmfan1   (Member)

Korngold's famed Violin Concerto:



In this video, David shares his favorite recording of the Korngold Violin Concerto: Gil Shaham supported by Andre Previn.

I did a "deep dive" into this composition earlier this year, comparing over 25 different recordings. I had a real blast doing so. I had a different opinion of the Shaham. While he is an excellent technical violinist, I didn't prefer some of his artistic interpretations. I also felt the orchestra was too recessed at times. Overall, it is a good representation of the piece, but it wasn't among my favorites.

What DID blow me away was the Vadim Gluzman performance with support from Neeme Jarvi. Hurwitz himself rated this 10/10. I can't recommend this performance more strongly.

I also greatly enjoyed these other performances (in no particular order):

Alexander Gilman under Perry So
Ulf Hoelscher under Willy Mattes
Andrew Haveron under John Wilson
Philippe Quint under Carlos Miguel Prieto
Vilde Frang under James Gaffigan
James Ehnes under Bramwell Tovey

There are more "famous" violinists who have made some good recordings, but they just didn't end up being among my favorites due to things like sound issues, artistic choices, and in some cases, a lack of passion or questionable technical precision.

By the way, the Heifetz performance under Alfred Wallenstein is historic and essential, though the sonics reflect the age of the recording

 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2022 - 7:35 AM   
 By:   EdG   (Member)

I did a "deep dive" into this composition earlier this year, comparing over 25 different recordings. I had real blast doing so. I had a different opinion of the Shaham. While he is an excellent technical violinist, I didn't prefer some of his artistic interpretations. I also felt the orchestra was too recessed at times. Overall, it is a good representation of the piece, but it wasn't among my favorites.

Completely agree. I thought Anne-Sophie Mutter with Previn was a bit better, and that was because the orchestra was sharper and more polished. I attribute that to Previn who is talented but maddeningly inconsistent from one recording to the next.

What DID blow me away was the Vadim Gluzman performance with support from Neeme Jarvi. Hurwitz himself rated this 10/10. I can't recommend this performance more strongly.

I'm going to check this one out based on your recommendation. Thanks. I'm really hoping for a recording from Hilary Hahn. She's performed the piece live several times and I enjoyed her more lyrical interpretation, almost as if she were first chair from the grand old days of the Warners studio orchestra.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2022 - 11:33 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I wanted to love the Shaham/Previn but it wasn't to my liking at all, mostly because the sound was just awful, IMO, almost brick walled. The Heifetz was, of course, my intro to the piece and has remained my favorite - for me, no one even comes close to him.

The Barber is a wonderful concerto, too, with many much better recordings.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2022 - 9:40 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Korngold's famed Violin Concerto:



In this video, David shares his favorite recording of the Korngold Violin Concerto: Gil Shaham supported by Andre Previn.

I did a "deep dive" into this composition earlier this year, comparing over 25 different recordings. I had a real blast doing so. I had a different opinion of the Shaham. While he is an excellent technical violinist, I didn't prefer some of his artistic interpretations. I also felt the orchestra was too recessed at times. Overall, it is a good representation of the piece, but it wasn't among my favorites.

What DID blow me away was the Vadim Gluzman performance with support from Neeme Jarvi. Hurwitz himself rated this 10/10. I can't recommend this performance more strongly.

I also greatly enjoyed these other performances (in no particular order):

Alexander Gilman under Perry So
Ulf Hoelscher under Willy Mattes
Andrew Haveron under John Wilson
Philippe Quint under Carlos Miguel Prieto
Vilde Frang under James Gaffigan
James Ehnes under Bramwell Tovey

There are more "famous" violinists who have made some good recordings, but they just didn't end up being among my favorites due to things like sound issues, artistic choices, and in some cases, a lack of passion or questionable technical precision.

By the way, the Heifetz performance under Alfred Wallenstein is historic and essential, though the sonics reflect the age of the recording


The mono sonics are, in fact, spectacular. It's a great-sounding recording technically.

 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2022 - 5:08 AM   
 By:   EdG   (Member)

Bernard Herrmann and Alfred Newman - THE EGYPTIAN

 
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