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 Posted:   Jul 8, 2001 - 2:32 AM   
 By:   Chris Kinsinger   (Member)

Veiled?...VEILED???

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/confused.gif">

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2001 - 5:58 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

...only for those who aren't "in on it." Yes, of course.

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2001 - 3:41 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Should we ask SheriffJoe to place a Codex in the FAQ?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2001 - 4:21 AM   
 By:   Chris Kinsinger   (Member)

...is it that time of the month already?

 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2001 - 8:07 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

I found the following in my e-mail upon my return to work from vacation:

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?
Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.
Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving
in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the War.
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred
honor.
What kind of men were they?
Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.
Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts and died in rags.
Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him and poverty was his reward.
Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Rutledge and Middleton.
At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson Jr, noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was
destroyed and Nelson died bankrupt.
Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife and she died within a few months.
John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she lay dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home
to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died
from exhaustion and a broken heart.
Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2001 - 11:46 PM   
 By:   CH-CD   (Member)

GEE !.......that's not what happened in the movie !!!!!!!!

 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2001 - 12:36 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

quote:
Originally posted by CH-CD:
GEE !.......that's not what happened in the movie !!!!!!!!

Well, the movie only took us up to the signing of the document...it didn't deal with the events that followed.

It was a most perilous endeavor!

But it was one well worth all that it cost!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2001 - 12:49 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

"Writing a week later to the new president of Congress, Thomas McKean, Adams added that..." (p. 264; took place sometime in 1781; bold print mine)

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2001 - 7:31 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Sigh. I merely copied the thing to the board...I didn't write it myself, and I did not take the time to edit it.

Have at it, all you nitpickers.

: )
[This message has been edited by Ron Pulliam (edited 11 July 2001).]

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2001 - 1:20 AM   
 By:   MICHAEL HOMA   (Member)

hi , really enjoyed all the comments about 1776 !!!in todays NY POST there is an interview with the director HUNT in LIZ SMITH 's column, and he tells the same story of JACK WARNER and the lost footage and they have found it and and are completing it now for DVD release . does anyone know the running time of the original film. the video is 142 mins . is that the running time of the laserd ?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2001 - 5:52 AM   
 By:   MICHAEL HOMA   (Member)

hi really enjoyed all the comments about 1776 !! in yesterdays NEW YORK POST there was an interview with PETER HULS HUNT he tells the same story i read here about JACK WARNER when he should the movie to NIXON , he NIXON , thought that some of the middle of the film was "bad for conservatives" and convinced WARNER to destroy that portion and edit the film drastically!!! WARNER regretted that cut all his life and before he died he told HUNT that the negative still exists and noe HUNT is going back to SONY to restore the film for a new release on DVD!!! does any one know the original running time of the film ? the video is 141 mins. and was the soundtrack released on cd ?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2001 - 10:18 AM   
 By:   Originalthinkr@aol.com   (Member)

I saw "1776" twice on Broadway (with Daniels, daSilva and Howard, of course)in the early 1970s, and resolved to get tickets for the Bicentennial performance on July 4, 1976, but alas, the show closed before then.

Thank God (the REAL one, not YOU, Mr. Adams!)for the laserdisc of the complete film! Now, how about a DVD, Columbia? (They've since found much of the camera negative for the scratched color and black-and-white workprint footage that was used for the laserdisc, you know.)

All of you who've contributed to this discussion, write, call, e-mail those folks at Columbiam will ya?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2001 - 1:50 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

It's done...it's done.

Per entry dated June 13, I have just finished reading all 651 pages. The book was due yesterday but thankfully they give a 24-hr. grace. Man, what a read. I shall have to pay a call on the Adams house in Quincy once again should I make the annual trek to New England in August. And this time I vow to check out the original houses, too, which still stand on the site of the old farm in Braintree.

"The letters of John and Abigail Adams number in the thousands, and because they both wrote with such consistent candor and in such vivid detail, it is possible to know them--to go beneath the surface of their lives--to an extent not possible with other protagonists of the time. Not Washington, not Jefferson, or Madison or Hamilton, not even Franklin for all he wrote, was so forthcoming on paper as was John Adams over a lifetime of writing about himself and his world." (Acknowledgements, p. 653)

Author McCullough is quite right, I really feel like I got to know them. Again. And the ever-constant images of Mr. Daniels & Miss Vestoff, not to mention Messrs. Howard and DaSilva, et al., etc. etc., ditto, ditto, once again helped to make the whole gang come alive, even more! I heartily endorse this work...if anybody's there...if anybody cares...if anybody wants to see what I see http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/wink.gif">.

*****************************************************************


[This message has been edited by Howard L (edited 12 July 2001).]

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2001 - 2:49 AM   
 By:   Chris Kinsinger   (Member)

Sounds fascinating indeed, Mr. Jefferson.
That's a book I would very much enjoy.
Now, to answer our friend Mr. Homa...I'm not certain of the running time of the director's cut of 1776, but I believe it's over three hours. The 141 minute cut (the version shown in theatres & on TV) is missing around half an hour or so.
If Eric Paddon returns, he can tell you. He has the Pioneer LaserDisc restoration of the director's cut that was released in 1990, and he seems fairly certain that a DVD release of it will show up soon.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2001 - 3:12 AM   
 By:   CH-CD   (Member)

quote:
Originally posted by MICHAEL HOMA:
hi , really enjoyed all the comments about 1776 !!!in todays NY POST there is an interview with the director HUNT in LIZ SMITH 's column, and he tells the same story of JACK WARNER and the lost footage and they have found it and and are completing it now for DVD release . does anyone know the running time of the original film. the video is 142 mins . is that the running time of the laserd ?


I believe that the original running time of the movie- before the cuts - was 175mts.
Doubtless, our friend JoeCaps, who restored the laser disc, will confirm this for us.
No Soundtrack CD yet Michael. Maybe we'll get lucky and have a seperate music track on the DVD ?????????

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2001 - 10:07 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

The restored LD, which also includes a totally reconstructed Overture and Entr'acte, runs 180 minutes.

The word at Home Theater Forum, where Joe Caps is also a regular participant, is that a DVD release will be next year and while some LD features such as the Peter Hunt interview/commentary will not be retained, the feeling is that this time the restored footage will be entirely from pristine source material (as opposed to the LD which had to use rough quality versions of the missing footage).

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2001 - 8:46 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

"I shall have to pay a call on the Adams house in Quincy once again should I make the annual trek to New England in August. And this time I vow to check out the original houses, too, which still stand on the site of the old farm in Braintree."

Done. Happily. For the movie it looks like they modeled the house on "the farm here in Braintree" not on the actual real deal but on the later residence in Quincy.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2001 - 12:35 AM   
 By:   Chris Kinsinger   (Member)

If I recall correctly, Peter Hunt said that those scenes were shot at "the Disney Ranch", wherever that is.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2001 - 3:24 AM   
 By:   Luscious Lazlo   (Member)

http://www.tompaine.com/history/2000/07/14/" TARGET=_blank>http://www.tompaine.com/history/2000/07/14/

Regarding the popular e-mail posted by Ron: The above rebuttal was written by a British historian. According to Eric Rauchway, that e-mail contains a lot of errors.

ERIC RAUCHWAY SAID: "And the establishment of the Constitution is a much more impressive achievement, and much more important to the history of the American Revolution, than the fighting of (and suffering in) the war of independence."

I disagree. I'm far more impressed by America's self-sacrificial rebelliousness than by any political document. In any morally sane world, the American war of independence should never have been necessary. But the English were morally insane. They were satanic barbarians. They were possessed by the spirit of satan. The war was basically a theological dispute between the Forces Of Light and the Forces Of Darkness. It was basic Manicheanism straight out of a George Lucas movie. And needless to say, it's flabbergasting how the Forces Of Darkness are so powerful.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2020 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

MT. GRETNA PLAYHOUSE presents a BIALYSTOCK/BLOOM PRODUCTION of
1776, directed by ROGER DEBRIS with orchestra conducted by MARCELO
FERREYRA assisted by AARON COLLINS, and original costumes designed by
CARMEN GIYA.

A partial listing of THE CAST, in order of appearance:

John ADAMS..................PETERK
Abigail ADAMS...............Bonita KINSINGER
Benjamin FRANKLIN...........John MAHER
Richard Henry LEE...........H ROCCO
Lyman HALL..................BULLDOG
Andrew MCNAIR...............Shaun RUTHERFORD
Stephen HOPKINS.............SPOR
Edward RUTLEDGE.............MWRUGER
Caesar RODNEY...............logieD
Thomas MCKEAN...............Lou GOLDBERG
John HANCOCK................Eric PADDON
John DICKINSON..............Chris KINSINGER
James WILSON................Luscious LAZLO
a COURIER...................JoeInSANDIEGO
Rev. Jonathan WITHERSPOON...LORIEN
Thomas JEFFERSON............Howard L
Martha JEFFERSON............joan HUE

understudy for Ms. hue: DEX

Incredible...

 
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