Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 7:42 AM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)


Elmer probably does in regard to The Scarlet Letter! big grin


LOL!

Alex

 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 9:55 AM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)


Elmer probably does in regard to The Scarlet Letter! big grin


LOL!

Alex


And this is of course off topic, but how in heck did that film wind up with three scores by three composers? It boggles my mind that this production received music from luminaries Morricone, Bernstein and Barry and still managed to be underwhelming upon its reception.

 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 10:02 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

It wouldn't be the first film. And though rare, there are supposed (still investigating) ones with four scores.

 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 3:44 PM   
 By:   danbeck   (Member)

It wouldn't be the first film. And though rare, there are supposed (still investigating) ones with four scores.
Serpent and the Rainbow

 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

It wouldn't be the first film. And though rare, there are supposed (still investigating) ones with four scores.
Serpent and the Rainbow


Really? I had no idea!

 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 5:01 PM   
 By:   danbeck   (Member)

It wouldn't be the first film. And though rare, there are supposed (still investigating) ones with four scores.
Serpent and the Rainbow


Really? I had no idea!


The Serpent And The Rainbow (1988):
First score by Nigerian drummer Babatunde Olatunji
Second score by Jeff Koz and Jesse Frederick (The Last Horror Film [1982], The Mission...Kill [1987])
Third score by Charles Bernstein (who had collaborated with Wes Craven on his previous movies Nigthmare On Elm Street [1984] and Deadly Friend [1986])
Fourth (used score) by Brad Fiedel (The Terminator [1984], Fright Night [1985])

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 7:13 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)


And this is of course off topic, but how in heck did that film wind up with three scores by three composers? It boggles my mind that this production received music from luminaries Morricone, Bernstein and Barry and still managed to be underwhelming upon its reception.


I heard a rumor that when it came time for Morricone to deliver the score, he presented the filmmakers with old tapes of an obscure score he'd written years earlier, "that is perfect for your film!" Don't know if there is any truth to that.

Bernstein's score was apparently personally rejected by Demi Moore. I recall Bernstein being quoted as saying he wanted to write her a letter, thanking her for freeing him to re-use the music in a better film.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 7:17 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

Another movie with three scores.

The Appointment (1969), by Sidney Lumet:

- Michel Legrand (unused)
- John Barry & Don Walker (used in cinema version)
- Stu Philips (used in TV version)

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 7:20 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

I heard a rumor that when it came time for Morricone to deliver the score, he presented the filmmakers with old tapes of an obscure score he'd written years earlier, "that is perfect for your film!" Don't know if there is any truth to that.

Bernstein's score was apparently personally rejected by Demi Moore. I recall Bernstein being quoted as saying he wanted to write her a letter, thanking her for freeing him to re-use the music in a better film.


Bernstein did call Barry, or wrote him a letter thanking him for freeing Bernstein from the movie.

This anecdote, coupled with yours, definitely confirms Elmer's strong sentiments against Scarlet Letter.

Ironically enough, he would go on and use the Scarlet theme for Gangs of New York, only to see this score thrown to the trash, as well.

Alex

 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2019 - 7:26 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

BLACK STALLION had multiple composers.
WHITE FANG too

 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2019 - 7:34 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

Ref: The Scarlet Letter, the apocrypha states that Demi always wanted a score that had the Dances With Wolves sound and style to it—and that made anything else doomed.

If that's true, they might have saved their time—and got a better DWW-esque score—by having that conversation up front and getting Barry involved first time round.

There's no way Barry's score was going to be special with just two weeks to write it.

I have to say though, sometimes he seemed to up his game under pressure. Sometimes a lack of time to ruminate stimulated his creativity. While I would not hold this Scarlet Letter score in remotely the same esteem I hold Out of Africa and Frances in, for a "two-weeker" it's pretty amazing what he came up with.

(Assuming, of course, he wasn't recycling rejected themes.)

Cheers

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2019 - 3:18 PM   
 By:   leagolfer   (Member)

Here is Bernstein's exact quote about John Barry from Starlog # 103, Feb 86:

"John's very special and very strange. I always have a feeling that John's scores depend completely on how he feels about a film. When he feels good about it, you can tell in his scores. The Lion in Winter, for instance, is really an impressive piece of work. I have a feeling he was devoted to that picture. In the same way, some of the early Bond scores are spectacular."



Thanks, haven't heard of Starlog I had a look I'm not finding that quote, I'll take it as face-value nothing said looks ran-over or squeezed, Bernstein knew JB's ethic & style, I don't think Barry was a perfectionist but no-way was he lazy or unimpressive before or after Howard that's how I see it.

If JB was unmotivated which I still think not, then i blame Connery he nothing but cried being hard-done-by for years, I've always loved JB call it patriotic maybe his illness made me that bit closer.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2019 - 4:22 PM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

In the same issue of Starlog Bernstein also gave short opinions on Goldsmith, Williams, Schifrin, Horner, Legrand. Maybe a couple of others.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2019 - 4:37 PM   
 By:   leagolfer   (Member)

In the same issue of Starlog Bernstein also gave short opinions on Goldsmith, Williams, Schifrin, Horner, Legrand. Maybe a couple of others.

Thanks VG553 all very interesting, I will look again the list was endless I'm missed bits, I take my snipe back from Elmer on Bond, i would of loved to have heard EB's Bond from loving McQ, Gold & Commissioner his take would of been grand.

 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2019 - 4:58 PM   
 By:   Mose Harper   (Member)

For anyone that wants to read the whole article

https://archive.org/details/starlog_magazine-103/page/n67

 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2020 - 1:16 PM   
 By:   Frank Vincent   (Member)

Howard the Duck is back in stock at Intrada.

http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.11784/.f

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2020 - 2:58 AM   
 By:   Leo Nicols   (Member)

I've been debating whether to buy this item ?
After the roasting the critics have given the film over the years it put me off a little, but after listening to the "samples" especially the superb John Barry score I may raid my Piggy Bank !

Damn it, I'll never be a rich man (sob) .......do I buy the "Duck".... or grouse ?

 
 Posted:   May 28, 2020 - 3:40 AM   
 By:   CrazyQuark   (Member)

I doubt you would be disappointed.

I love it (especially Disc 1) and I have never seen the movie.

 
 Posted:   May 28, 2020 - 6:11 AM   
 By:   JGouse0498   (Member)

I've been debating whether to buy this item ?
After the roasting the critics have given the film over the years it put me off a little, but after listening to the "samples" especially the superb John Barry score I may raid my Piggy Bank !

Damn it, I'll never be a rich man (sob) .......do I buy the "Duck".... or grouse ?


I saw Howard the Duck when it hit video stores (or maybe I saw it on HBO). Even at...six years old, maybe seven...even then I knew the movie was seriously screwed up. When Intrada first released this, I was genuinely surprised to hear the samples. I didn't even realize John Barry had scored it. However, I remembered how awful the movie was and couldn't rationalize paying so much for THAT movie's score even though I kinda liked it.

One of the ways I'm coping with this pandemic is apparently "impulse binge buying" film scores, so I finally picked up this release.

I can tell you that passing on it originally was a HUGE mistake!

This score is an absolutely fantastic listening experience! Even the Thomas Dolby rock songs are a guilty pleasure. You can almost hear just how much fun Lea Thompson was having singing those songs (and yes, tracks 1, 4, 6-8 really are her singing!) The Sylvester Levay re-score does get a bit repetitive, but that's because there are only a handful of cues that he did and Intrada included multiple versions.

If the only reason you're holding back is because of the movie's reputation, then you should order it immediately. It's a great score that was far too good for the movie for which it was written.

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2020 - 12:20 PM   
 By:   Leo Nicols   (Member)

I've been debating whether to buy this item ?
After the roasting the critics have given the film over the years it put me off a little, but after listening to the "samples" especially the superb John Barry score I may raid my Piggy Bank !

Damn it, I'll never be a rich man (sob) .......do I buy the "Duck".... or grouse ?


I saw Howard the Duck when it hit video stores (or maybe I saw it on HBO). Even at...six years old, maybe seven...even then I knew the movie was seriously screwed up. When Intrada first released this, I was genuinely surprised to hear the samples. I didn't even realize John Barry had scored it. However, I remembered how awful the movie was and couldn't rationalize paying so much for THAT movie's score even though I kinda liked it.

One of the ways I'm coping with this pandemic is apparently "impulse binge buying" film scores, so I finally picked up this release.

I can tell you that passing on it originally was a HUGE mistake!

This score is an absolutely fantastic listening experience! Even the Thomas Dolby rock songs are a guilty pleasure. You can almost hear just how much fun Lea Thompson was having singing those songs (and yes, tracks 1, 4, 6-8 really are her singing!) The Sylvester Levay re-score does get a bit repetitive, but that's because there are only a handful of cues that he did and Intrada included multiple versions.

If the only reason you're holding back is because of the movie's reputation, then you should order it immediately. It's a great score that was far too good for the movie for which it was written.


It's hard to imagine what John Barry was thinking ?
But the score is fantastic !.....I'll place an order for that one.

Thanks,
Leo.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2020 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved...