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 Posted:   Oct 15, 2014 - 12:08 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Guinness Extra Stout would probably taste great in a stroganoff, and it's readily available at grocery stores and such.



Boy, the display of beer at the local market is DIZZYING. All these wonky little brands with their weird-o names.

What the heck happened to Pabst, Bud, Schlitz and Schmuck? Names you can trust? big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2014 - 12:33 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

The rise of the microbreweries is the greatest BLESSING ever! Beer 4-EVER! wink

I hope you find what you desire, David. If you want stronger, perhaps it's worth trying a Belgian-type ale (like a Trappiste) -- but not higher than 10%, IMO. That would ruin the flavour. It's a sweet type of beer; less bitter.

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2014 - 1:03 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

You could try this feller -



But don't tell anyone I said so.

A mate of mine would not take kindly to suggesting you eat it. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2014 - 4:20 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

I second Thor's championing of microbreweries. We have more varieties now than ever. From what you say David, it does sound like you want a strong tasting, possibly black beer. For that most labelled stout, or porter should do. Guinness will be good, and there are many Belgian dark beers too.

My own favourite Stout these days is Gorlovka, from the Acorn Brewery of Barnsley, just a few miles from where I live in the north of England. It's got body, and a gutsy bitter taste. They do it in bottles, but boy if you get it on handpump in a pub, it's so good!

Most of the time though these days I'm a pale ale drinker. I like plenty of hops and a nice bitter edge, and if I'm 'having a few', a strength around 4-4.5%. Acorn do a great standard called Barnsley Gold, which I drink almost every day. This week I'm sampling a beauty from the Osset Brewery called Inception, which I will be enjoying later this evening in The Crown, one of my 'locals'.

http://acorn-brewery.co.uk/
http://www.ossett-brewery.co.uk/

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2014 - 6:38 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

I'm 43 and I've just discovered the joys of real beer after being in Belgium and sampling about 50 of the local brews.

I'm into British beers from brewers like Shepherd Neame at the moment. Pungent hops, bitter aftertaste.

Mud City Stout is nice, and might be suitable for flavouring dishes. Not that I know anything about cookery. It's from my neck of the woods and might not be available elsewhere.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2014 - 7:15 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I was hooked on Belgian beer too, after my first trip there in 2010. I've been there (almost) every year since and continue to work my way through their massive assortment. In fact, I'll be going there again in a week.

I also like pale ale, like paul mentions. I remember the first time I tasted it, I didn't like it at all. An overwhelming sense of drinking pine. But then after 2-3 tries, I became hooked on that too. I can't drink pale ale (or weissbier, for that matter) for an entire evening, but it's good inbetween the heavier stuff.

Anyways, don't want to derail David's thread too much. I'm a beer lover, but I have no experience of using it in cooking.

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2014 - 8:02 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

Jolson's thoughts on beer in England:

"They drink it warm in England. Personally, I think they should have put it back in the horse."

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2014 - 8:38 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

Jolson's thoughts on beer in England:

"They drink it warm in England. Personally, I think they should have put it back in the horse."


I prefer it room temperature, no doubt.

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2014 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Jolson's thoughts on beer in England:

"They drink it warm in England. Personally, I think they should have put it back in the horse."


Hehe, horse piss wink

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 8:46 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Jolson's thoughts on beer in England:

"They drink it warm in England. Personally, I think they should have put it back in the horse."


I prefer it room temperature, no doubt.


Room temperature allows the flavours to register. Possibly one reason the folks in the US drink their beer cold is to hide the taste! Hey, I don't blame them!

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Jolson's thoughts on beer in England:

"They drink it warm in England. Personally, I think they should have put it back in the horse."


I prefer it room temperature, no doubt.


Room temperature allows the flavours to register. Possibly one reason the folks in the US drink their beer cold is to hide the taste! Hey, I don't blame them!


There is a big difference between the ice cold temperature people serve beers at (like coors light) and the craft beer that is now available in the US and served at more normal cold temperatures. Letting beers warm up a little bit is great but too much and it does start to taste weird.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 11:02 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Exactly.

I've just had two beers from the micro brewery on Fur, Denmark. Fantastic beer, one of my favourite breweries in the world (I'm biased because we have a summer house there).

Anyway, I bought it back in early September, stored it in room temperature (which one should with strong ales like this), then put it in the fridge this morning. I took it out some 20 minutes before I drank them, and they were OK. However, it was a taste element of yeast in it, due to the two-month storage. Something to take notice of.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2017 - 7:54 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

All right you knuckleheads smile , we're back to square one.

I tried a brown ale called "Downtown Brown" last time and, in spite of its fashionably quirky art direction, it did nothing special for my Stroganoff recipe.

So I'm taking matters into my own grimy paws. I bought a bottle of "Corona Extra," a beer I see drunk by the coarse and the common smile , which I hope means it will be the coarse and common taste I'm looking for, for this sauce.

It's for my birthday this week, so it better work out, or heads will roll!! smile

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2017 - 8:21 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2017 - 1:44 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I can't see Corona working in a Stroganoff, David, but experimentation is always useful. Perhaps it gives the dish a 'lemoney" taste. smile

 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2017 - 7:43 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

All right you knuckleheads smile , we're back to square one.

I tried a brown ale called "Downtown Brown" last time and, in spite of its fashionably quirky art direction, it did nothing special for my Stroganoff recipe.

So I'm taking matters into my own grimy paws. I bought a bottle of "Corona Extra," a beer I see drunk by the coarse and the common smile , which I hope means it will be the coarse and common taste I'm looking for, for this sauce.

It's for my birthday this week, so it better work out, or heads will roll!! smile


First, Happy Birthday! smile
Please let us know how your recipe works out.
I've never cooked with beer and know less than virtually anyone here about beer anyway. I've tried beer-battered foods and like most of those. Since my house is antiquated and I have no stove hood and no way to install one, does beer stink up the house when using it for cooking?
Sort of topic related, here's an interesting article on the beer can chicken myth, with the author stating how a can of beer, even if it all cooked in would contribute no more than a teaspoon of flavor to the chicken.
http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/debunking_beer_can_chicken.html
I also read of using Marmite as a beer substitute but don't know if it is as good. Perhaps some here have tried it?

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2017 - 4:52 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I can't see Corona working in a Stroganoff, David, but experimentation is always useful. Perhaps it gives the dish a 'lemoney" taste. smile

Lemon??? Oh, geez.

Somebody recommended some thing with "Negro" in the name. Maybe I'll try that???

Better yet, there's liquor store about a block from this library. If there's someone who didn't just graduate from high school behind the counter, maybe I'll ask them on the way home.

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2017 - 4:54 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)


First, Happy Birthday! smile
Please let us know how your recipe works out.
I've never cooked with beer and know less than virtually anyone here about beer anyway. I've tried beer-battered foods and like most of those. Since my house is antiquated and I have no stove hood and no way to install one, does beer stink up the house when using it for cooking?
Sort of topic related, here's an interesting article on the beer can chicken myth, with the author stating how a can of beer, even if it all cooked in would contribute no more than a teaspoon of flavor to the chicken.
http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/debunking_beer_can_chicken.html
I also read of using Marmite as a beer substitute but don't know if it is as good. Perhaps some here have tried it?


Thanks, Jack! I'll post again this weekend.

No it doesn't stink up the place, not for long anyway.

2 minutes left on my time at the library computer. Will post more soon!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2017 - 8:23 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Health Reminders
1. One gram of alcohol equals 7 kcal. It means it is very caloric as opposed to carb (4 kcal) and protein (4 kcal) and it also means you can be over-weight if you drink too much.
2. Most alcoholic libations are filled with pesticide owing to the agro-industry (Monsanto-Bayer). It means you can get a good old cancer if you drink too much.
3. Beer has the highest value of fast sugar: 110, which stimulates the insulin hormone. It means you can get diabetes if you drink too much.

A word to the wise, at least, buy organic alcohol, pesticide-free and chemical-free. You can try anything related to Demeter and the bio-dynamics agriculture.
http://www.demeter-usa.org

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2017 - 9:14 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

https://www.guysdrinkingbeer.com/arcade-festus-rotgut#gallery-image/

 
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