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 Posted:   Mar 6, 2016 - 5:01 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Apparently there's a new mystery sub genre emerging: Hemingway as detective! I have Hemingway Deadlights and it is a breezy read. There's a second book, too: Hemingway Cutthroat, set during the Spanish Civil War.

https://jsydneyjones.wordpress.com/2010/08/03/hemingway-on-the-case-the-mystery-novels-of-michael-atkinson/

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2016 - 5:54 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

Apparently there's a new mystery sub genre emerging: Hemingway as detective!

oh boy, what's next? Are Sun Also Rises, Death in the Afternoon, and A Moveable Feast going to be turned into vampire and zombie films?

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2016 - 6:13 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Apparently there's a new mystery sub genre emerging: Hemingway as detective!

oh boy, what's next? Are Sun Also Rises, Death in the Afternoon, and A Moveable Feast going to be turned into vampire and zombie films?


You FSM nerds are always thinking about that sci fi fantasy bullshit, even when it's not the subject at hand. wink

Admit it, you LOVE "Papa", which is why you cannot resist the awesomeness of this topic.

Besides, this is nothing new, old sport. wink Author George Baxt employed famous movie couples as the protagonists. The intriguing concept is perhaps best realized in his last novel, The Clark Gable & Carole Lombard Murder Case. Amateur detectives Gable and Lombard are in pursuit of a kidnapper of movie star babies amid the backdrop of Gone with the Wind’s premiere, though the plot is also a nod to the Lindbergh baby kidnapping of 1932. George Baxt had previously written "The Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers Murder Case", with its Cold War-era intrigue in Moscow and early 1950s Hollywood, and "The William Powell & Myrna Loy Murder Case."

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2016 - 7:09 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

You FSM nerds are always thinking about that sci fi fantasy bullshit, even when it's not the subject at hand. wink

kinda ruined my joking, predictable extrapolation of this pastiche. Imagining Ernie as a detective in his sober moments belongs in the same category as current horror take-offs on classic novels. And yeah, we know the fact/fiction mash-up genre isnt new.

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2016 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

All in good fun, old sport. smile

Speaking of pastiche, how many times did you go and see Star Wars VII? (Please don't answer).

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2016 - 12:33 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

All in good fun, old sport. smile

Speaking of pastiche, how many times did you go and see Star Wars VII? (Please don't answer).



I saw it once and pastiche opportunity to see it again.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2016 - 2:49 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

I grew up hearing that he was obsessed with death. And yet the more I took in and continue to take in the more I feel the opposite, that he was obsessed with life. For me he saw death as the ultimate cheat and could never reconcile the great irony i.e. from the moment of birth it's one long death sentence. You want a sci fi parallel? If I'm onto the Hemingway zeitgeist--if--then he and the Rutger Hauer character in Blade Runner and the "Tears in Rain" climax have a lot in common. The latter confronts his "creator" and destroys him in rage after the inadequate response as to why the creator would place the desire to live forever within the 'heart' of his creation while deliberately programming a limited lifespan. It all makes for something like rebellion. Hemingway had his moveable feast, Batty saw things you people wouldn't believe; ultimately, all their moments would be lost, in time. An unreconciliable cheat. Futility.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2016 - 7:48 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I grew up hearing that he was obsessed with death. And yet the more I took in and continue to take in the more I feel the opposite, that he was obsessed with life. For me he saw death as the ultimate cheat and could never reconcile the great irony i.e. from the moment of birth it's one long death sentence. You want a sci fi parallel? If I'm onto the Hemingway zeitgeist--if--then he and the Rutger Hauer character in Blade Runner and the "Tears in Rain" climax have a lot in common. The latter confronts his "creator" and destroys him in rage after the inadequate response as to why the creator would place the desire to live forever within the 'heart' of his creation while deliberately programming a limited lifespan. It all makes for something like rebellion. Hemingway had his moveable feast, Batty saw things you people wouldn't believe; ultimately, all their moments would be lost, in time. An unreconciliable cheat. Futility.

I suppose many of that Lost Generation who experienced the Hell of World War I got the distinct impression that life was indeed nasty, brutish, and short (kind of like a few FSMers, though none reading or writing on this thread, of course) and that they'd better get around to enjoying things or perhaps more accurately, doing whatever it was they loved to block out the horror they'd seen. I wonder if Hemingway faced that stuff head on as opposed to blocking it out because let's face it, just abut everything the man wrote was fixated on violence, death, and lost love.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 10, 2016 - 5:15 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Just to let you know, Mr. Phelps, I am half-way through For Whom the Bell Tolls. Never read it before.

 
 Posted:   Apr 10, 2016 - 5:21 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

Just to let you know, Mr. Phelps, I am half-way through For Whom the Bell Tolls. Never read it before.

so is it just like BLADE RUNNER? big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 14, 2016 - 8:42 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

I completed the entire novel a few hours ago.

It was recommended by a 91-year-old friend who said it was his favorite Hemingway. The reading was very much an endurance test the first two hundred or so pages, but boy am I glad I endured. All that exposition or whatever set me up for terrific anticipation over the last several chapters. I really knew those people. And am haunted by the finale.

The vast majority of my recreational reading is non-fiction and biographies. It has been a long time since I've read fiction like this. What an exercise. And well worth it. But I think I'm going back to his short stories for a stretch.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 14, 2016 - 8:54 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Just to let you know, Mr. Phelps, I am half-way through For Whom the Bell Tolls. Never read it before.

so is it just like BLADE RUNNER? big grin


heh heh well to carry on the Blade Runner savoir faire association, note this from chapter twenty-six:

And another thing. Don’t ever kid yourself about loving some one. It is just that most people are not lucky enough ever to have it. You never had it before and now you have it. What you have with Maria, whether it lasts just through today and a part of tomorrow, or whether it lasts for a long life is the most important thing that can happen to a human being. There will always be people who say it does not exist because they cannot have it. But I tell you it is true and that you have it and that you are lucky even if you die tomorrow.

Cut out the dying stuff, he said to himself. That’s not the way we talk. That’s the way our friends the anarchists talk. Whenever things get really bad they want to set fire to something and to die. It’s a very odd kind of mind they have. Very odd. Well, we’re getting through today, old timer, he told himself. It’s nearly three o’clock now and there is going to be some food sooner or later. They are still shooting up at Sordo’s, which means that they have him surrounded and are waiting to bring up more people, probably. Though they have to make it before dark.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 19, 2016 - 9:03 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Just posted about my viewing of the film adaptation:

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=114779&forumID=1&archive=0

 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2016 - 7:39 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Off to see the Papa Hemingway in Cuba movie today. I know the reviews haven't been kind but mainstream Hemingway events are so few these days, so I "must" go and see the film.

 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2016 - 8:01 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

Off to see the Papa Hemingway in Cuba movie today. I know the reviews haven't been kind but mainstream Hemingway events are so few these days, so I "must" go and see the film.

I have to go see it tomorrow with my 76-year-old mother because my stepfather was Cuban and she has visited the place, and was once a huge fan of Hemingway, though now she just regards him as a tragic drunk.

 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2016 - 8:17 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Off to see the Papa Hemingway in Cuba movie today. I know the reviews haven't been kind but mainstream Hemingway events are so few these days, so I "must" go and see the film.

I have to go see it tomorrow with my 76-year-old mother because my stepfather was Cuban and she has visited the place, and was once a huge fan of Hemingway, though now she just regards him as a tragic drunk.


From what I've read and from some documentaries I've seen, the restoration of La Finca Vigia continues but visitors may only peer inside the house from the windows as the interior is still too delicate. Speaking of Hemingway houses, I'll be in Key West next month to have a look at that particular Hemingway house. Shockingly, this lifelong Floridian hasn't ever been to Key West, though I have visited other islands in the chain.

As for Hemingway the tragic drunk: "Show me a hero and I'll prove he's a bum."

~ Gregory "Pappy" Boyington (not the Robert Conrad version)

 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2016 - 9:26 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I've been to his house in Key West, back in the summer of 1976. I lived in Ft. Lauderdale for twenty-five years, until I just had enough with dread of hurricanes, the damned heat and humidity, and the traffic. Wouldn't be caught dead there now.

 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2016 - 9:35 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I've been to his house in Key West, back in the summer of 1976. I lived in Ft. Lauderdale for twenty-five years, until I just had enough with dread of hurricanes, the damned heat and humidity, and the traffic. Wouldn't be caught dead there now.

As of this writing, the area has not been inconvenienced by hurricanes since 2005. wink The heat, humidity, and traffic remain, of course.

I see that you're in North Carolina. My family used to summer on Lake Lure and my grandfather grew up in Four Oaks, North Carolina, which, to my then-eight-year-old eyes, was as close to Mayberry as one could get.

Currently reading a Hemingway booze book, To Have and Have Another, which features anecdotes, history, cocktail recipes and alcohol as it was "portrayed" in Hemingway's books.

I visited Vienna and Prague this past month and was amused by the omnipresence of Havana Club rum over there. Meanwhile, I'm less than 200 miles from Cuba and I can't get a bottle of the stuff in any legit store. In the spirit of Hemingway, I did try some of that rum and while it is nice enough as far as rum goes, there are many superior brands of (non-Cuban) rum available.

 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2016 - 9:51 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I don't drink. Gives me a headache.

Yeah. I live in North Carolina now, not far from Asheville, for economic reasons only. Not really that crazy about the place. If I had my choice -- and the income -- I'd live in Manhattan. Suits my disposition. (I'm originally from New York state.)

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2016 - 2:04 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Speaking of Hemingway houses, I'll be in Key West next month to have a look at that particular Hemingway house. Shockingly, this lifelong Floridian hasn't ever been to Key West, though I have visited other islands in the chain.

Heh, I've been thinking lately of heading down m'self what with this Hemingway kick and never having hit the Keys. Travel options aplenty from the Tampa Bay area. But for now I'll settle with a viewing of Hemingway's Adventures of a Young Man per yet another thread.

 
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