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 Posted:   Jan 7, 2024 - 3:46 PM   
 By:   fmfan1   (Member)

I would say that it's definitely integrated into the score by Cordell. It's non-diegetic (they aren't in a church or anything), used for its overt religious connotations. It also fits the mood of the rest of Cordell's score, which is about maybe 40% choral. Some have likened it to Goldsmith's OMEN trilogy. But you're da boss, fmfan 1, you decide if it makes da list!

You @#*&%*# right I'm the boss! My control is absolute and I must insist on either garish reverence or quivering penitence (or both) if one somehow musters the courage to offer another entry to this list.

KNEEL BEFORE ZOD! Mwah-hah-hah-hah-hah!!!!!!!

(That said: Sure, "Demon" has been added to the list.)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2024 - 3:55 PM   
 By:   fmfan1   (Member)

#276: Amistad by John Williams. "July 4, 1839" at 3:35.


 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2024 - 9:50 AM   
 By:   Symphorch   (Member)

This won't be news to anyone familiar with an earlier thread on the subject, but I can't resist posing the same question that stumped folks for many months at that time: What is the longest sustained use of the Dies Irae (both tune and text) in a movie? (Yes, it is listed in the present thread.)

Not sure if the actual answer has been found, but I do recall an arrangement of Dies Irae played on period instruments in the form of a processional in Ken Russell's The Devils. In addition to the fabulously dissonant score by Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, David Munrow and his early music ensemble arranged a number of period pieces played in a diegetic context. It's rather early in the movie.

Still holding out hope (for no particular reason) that one day a proper soundtrack release for the movie will come through, besides just the suite that Aquarius recorded.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2024 - 1:37 PM   
 By:   oregstevens   (Member)

This won't be news to anyone familiar with an earlier thread on the subject, but I can't resist posing the same question that stumped folks for many months at that time: What is the longest sustained use of the Dies Irae (both tune and text) in a movie? (Yes, it is listed in the present thread.)

Not sure if the actual answer has been found...


Isn't it Friedhofer's Between Heaven and Hell?

 
 Posted:   Jan 11, 2024 - 3:45 AM   
 By:   Ratatouille   (Member)

In Menken's Hunchback of Notre Dame...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saW3IeKUFYc

 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2024 - 7:56 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Joe McDermott riffs on the Dies Irae in the track "Curse of the Tongue" from his soundtrack for the (super corny and fun but hard as hell) 1993 Konami video game Zombies Ate My Neighbors:

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2024 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   teacher.8007   (Member)

The latest Christopher Young 'The Piper' in its entirety is the DIes Irae motif reworked for flute, orchestra and voices...

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 7:28 AM   
 By:   basmith   (Member)

In case nobody has already mentioned this one: George Gershwin - Rhapsody In Blue. I’m not sure all of the examples were intentional quotations, although they clearly use those intervals. It’s almost like foundational music grammar at this point.

 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 7:34 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

In case nobody has already mentioned this one: George Gershwin - Rhapsody In Blue. I’m not sure all of the examples were intentional quotations, although they clearly use those intervals. It’s almost like foundational music grammar at this point.

Well, that's why I would not include a reference that isn't an "actual" reference. You will always find some intervals, obviously, these are just building blocks. But the "Dies Irae" chant is often quoted in very specific and intentional ways, which isn't the same as coincidental similarities in intervals. I don't think the Rhapsody in Blue intentionally (or clearly recognizably) quotes the "Dies Irae".

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 7:58 AM   
 By:   basmith   (Member)

In case nobody has already mentioned this one: George Gershwin - Rhapsody In Blue. I’m not sure all of the examples were intentional quotations, although they clearly use those intervals. It’s almost like foundational music grammar at this point.

Well, that's why I would not include a reference that isn't an "actual" reference. You will always find some intervals, obviously, these are just building blocks. But the "Dies Irae" chant is often quoted in very specific and intentional ways, which isn't the same as coincidental similarities in intervals. I don't think the Rhapsody in Blue intentionally (or clearly recognizably) quotes the "Dies Irae".


You may be right about whether it is an intentional quote. But the intervals are very clearly recognizable, and repeated several times. Listen to the solo piano section in the middle, approximately 8:30 - 10:00. The phrase functions in the same way it functions in the Star Wars main theme, as a sort of descending response to the ascending call. I believe we should include both examples or neither, to be consistent.

 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 8:15 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

In case nobody has already mentioned this one: George Gershwin - Rhapsody In Blue. I’m not sure all of the examples were intentional quotations, although they clearly use those intervals. It’s almost like foundational music grammar at this point.

Well, that's why I would not include a reference that isn't an "actual" reference. You will always find some intervals, obviously, these are just building blocks. But the "Dies Irae" chant is often quoted in very specific and intentional ways, which isn't the same as coincidental similarities in intervals. I don't think the Rhapsody in Blue intentionally (or clearly recognizably) quotes the "Dies Irae".


You may be right about whether it is an intentional quote. But the intervals are very clearly recognizable, and repeated several times. Listen to the solo piano section in the middle, approximately 8:30 - 10:00. The phrase functions in the same way it functions in the Star Wars main theme, as a sort of descending response to the ascending call. I believe we should include both examples or neither, to be consistent.


I think STAR WARS is not listed there because of the "Main Theme" though, but rather because of the music when Luke sees the burned corpses of Aunt Beru and Uncle Owen,

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 8:36 AM   
 By:   Prince Damian   (Member)

Isn't it also in binary sunset( I think that's the one I mean).

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2024 - 1:14 PM   
 By:   mikael488   (Member)

Francesco De Masi's score to the comedy spaghetti-western "Per un pugno nell'occhio" (1965) contains a variation
on the hymn in the following track:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySaTwzOHm60

The film is apparently a spoof on Leone's "A fistful of dollars".




 
 
 Posted:   May 2, 2024 - 5:12 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Surprised no one's mentioned this but Chirs Young's new score for The Piper features it prominently.

 
 Posted:   May 3, 2024 - 2:32 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

Surprised no one's mentioned this but Chirs Young's new score for The Piper features it prominently.


It was mentioned a few posts up there on April 18th.

 
 
 Posted:   May 3, 2024 - 5:11 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)


It was mentioned a few posts up there on April 18th.


Ah whoops kinda hidden on there when people started talking about Gershwin....

 
 
 Posted:   May 5, 2024 - 5:13 AM   
 By:   fmfan1   (Member)

In case nobody has already mentioned this one: George Gershwin - Rhapsody In Blue. I’m not sure all of the examples were intentional quotations, although they clearly use those intervals. It’s almost like foundational music grammar at this point.

Well, that's why I would not include a reference that isn't an "actual" reference. You will always find some intervals, obviously, these are just building blocks. But the "Dies Irae" chant is often quoted in very specific and intentional ways, which isn't the same as coincidental similarities in intervals. I don't think the Rhapsody in Blue intentionally (or clearly recognizably) quotes the "Dies Irae".


You may be right about whether it is an intentional quote. But the intervals are very clearly recognizable, and repeated several times. Listen to the solo piano section in the middle, approximately 8:30 - 10:00. The phrase functions in the same way it functions in the Star Wars main theme, as a sort of descending response to the ascending call. I believe we should include both examples or neither, to be consistent.


I think STAR WARS is not listed there because of the "Main Theme" though, but rather because of the music when Luke sees the burned corpses of Aunt Beru and Uncle Owen,


Yes, Star Wars is on the list because of the corpse scene, not the main title theme. Part of the challenge of adding to the list is not including examples where the 4 notes just happen to occur without the proper context. The emphasis that Gershwin puts on those 4 notes catches the attention, and if the piece had been titled something like "Devil's Dance," then it might be a good candidate. But as far as I know, there is no context suggesting death, danger, or impending doom.

I even had to scrutinize THE PIPER a bit (even though the context was super obvious) because the interval from the 3rd note to the 4th note is one-half step larger than usual. However, since the second phrase of the melody in THE PIPER mimics the shape of the second phrase of the Dies Irae tune, I can be more confident in concluding that it is a knowing reference.

I like the additional examples that have appeared recently!

 
 
 Posted:   May 20, 2024 - 5:44 AM   
 By:   Dorian   (Member)

 
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