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 Posted:   Sep 22, 2018 - 1:53 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Thanks, Neil; fascinating reading.

I bought Arnold Samuelson's book decades ago, and it's worth picking up if one finds it. There's another book by a would-be, wayward, Depression-era writer who meets Papa, but its title and author elude me at the moment. It was published by a small company and it has grammar errors galore, so I didn't bother. I read it, in all places, at a bed and breakfast in St. Augustine, Florida. The place is called "Hemingway House."

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2018 - 7:39 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Neat article. "Mice" must have felt so unfulfilled as a laborer. It would seem he lacked the confidence that he could support a family as a writer. But he had the heart and soul of a writer. Such pain.

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2018 - 11:50 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Neat article. "Mice" must have felt so unfulfilled as a laborer. It would seem he lacked the confidence that he could support a family as a writer. But he had the heart and soul of a writer. Such pain.

What's that Hemingway quote about any story followed long enough ends badly?

 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2018 - 6:53 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

Hey Phelps, did you ever get around to reading Dearborn's biography?

 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2018 - 7:01 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Hey Phelps, did you ever get around to reading Dearborn's biography?

I have not. Presently, I am reading "Everybody Behaves Badly: The True Story Behind Hemingway’s Masterpiece The Sun Also Rises" by Lesley M. M. Blume. So far, it has proven to be an exceedingly well written and enjoyable book, and it has my enthusiastic recommendation.

Heck, I even grew back my beard.

 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2018 - 9:10 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

Hey Phelps, did you ever get around to reading Dearborn's biography?

I have not. Presently, I am reading "Everybody Behaves Badly: The True Story Behind Hemingway’s Masterpiece The Sun Also Rises" by Lesley M. M. Blume. So far, it has proven to be an exceedingly well written and enjoyable book, and it has my enthusiastic recommendation.

Heck, I even grew back my beard.


Jim,
I just started it; so far an excellent book.

 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2018 - 5:23 PM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

Don't recall seeing this earlier in the thread, but I just finished reading this article.

Last Words
Those Hemingway wrote, and those he didn’t.
by Joan Didion.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1998/11/09/last-words-6

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2018 - 7:32 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

Here's a new release that could be fun to thumb through.

https://amzn.to/2Cev1er

Ernest Hemingway: Artifacts From a Life

"the story of American icon Ernest Hemingway's life through the documents, photographs, and miscellany he kept"

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2018 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Here's a new release that could be fun to thumb through.

https://amzn.to/2Cev1er

Ernest Hemingway: Artifacts From a Life

"the story of American icon Ernest Hemingway's life through the documents, photographs, and miscellany he kept"


Added to my Christmas wishlist.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 20, 2019 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

from NY Times April 19, 1925--

"With sensitive insight and keen psychological observation, Fitzgerald discloses in these people a meanness of spirit, carelessness and absence of loyalties. He cannot hate them, for they are dumb in their insensate selfishness, and only to be pitied. The philosopher of the flapper has escaped the mordant, but he has turned grave. A curious book, a mystical, glamourous story of today. It takes a deeper cut at life than hitherto has been enjoyed by Mr. Fitzgerald. He writes well-he always has-for he writes naturally, and his sense of form is becoming perfected."

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/00/12/24/specials/fitzgerald-gatsby.html?_r=1

 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2019 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

from NY Times April 19, 1925--

"With sensitive insight and keen psychological observation, Fitzgerald discloses in these people a meanness of spirit, carelessness and absence of loyalties. He cannot hate them, for they are dumb in their insensate selfishness, and only to be pitied. The philosopher of the flapper has escaped the mordant, but he has turned grave. A curious book, a mystical, glamourous story of today. It takes a deeper cut at life than hitherto has been enjoyed by Mr. Fitzgerald. He writes well-he always has-for he writes naturally, and his sense of form is becoming perfected."

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/00/12/24/specials/fitzgerald-gatsby.html?_r=1


Jayson Blair couldn't have stated it any better... wink

Can't imagine the Times being profound about anything happening now.

 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2019 - 11:39 AM   
 By:   Adventures of Jarre Jarre   (Member)

I came here expecting Paul Rudd's photo.

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 3:38 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I came here expecting Paul Rudd's photo.

Expect away, pal.

Despite having owned the DVD for over a year now, I have yet to watch his performance in the A&E "Gatsby."

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2019 - 9:57 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

On my lunch hour, reading Times (hard copy) and came across this tasty morsel:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/23/books/dear-scott-dearest-zelda-fitzgerald-love-letters.html

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2019 - 4:17 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It will never cease to perplex me as to why Scott wasted so much of his life obsessing over Zelda, who clearly wasn't worth it. She was his muse, but ugh, what a hideous parasite she was. I'm not so sure he even visited her in the bughouse when she was finally locked up for what turned out to be for good (until she died in that most ghastly and horrific way).

Speaking of letters, vol. 5 of Hemingway's letters is due out early next year. It should have been published at the end of this year, so it must be one huge volume. It should cover 1932-34 or thereabouts.

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2019 - 3:34 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

One of the infinite wonderful aspects about Hemingway's work--forget the man and his numerous foibles--is that his writing STILL rankles the uptight, the readily "offended" politically-correct fascists, and the superficial contrarians. Hemingway does this with the timeless subjects of his work--love, death, and courage--which never fail to enlighten and inspire.

The trademark of a great artist is the ability of his or her work to yank an emotional response from its audience, and Hemingway's writing will always do this.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2019 - 6:27 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

On that note--thank you for reminding me: Was talking recently to a friend who had survived a pulmonary embolism after being told chances of survival were slim to none. It's now 2 years. Anyway, brought up H's line about "Fear death, but don't be afraid to die." Have we talked about this already? Did he say it that way?? Either way, it was a good conversation. I've been in intensive care m'self (some years ago) and so could relate. Nothing morbid or anything in the discussion and there were others present, too.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2019 - 8:50 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

On that note--thank you for reminding me: Was talking recently to a friend who had survived a pulmonary embolism after being told chances of survival were slim to none. It's now 2 years. Anyway, brought up H's line about "Fear death, but don't be afraid to die." Have we talked about this already? Did he say it that way?? Either way, it was a good conversation. I've been in intensive care m'self (some years ago) and so could relate. Nothing morbid or anything in the discussion and there were others present, too.

Don't think he ever said those words exactly, but his son John ("Bumby") stated that Papa believed that one's attitude in dealing with death was what mattered, not the actual dying.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2019 - 11:56 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

On that note--thank you for reminding me: Was talking recently to a friend who had survived a pulmonary embolism after being told chances of survival were slim to none. It's now 2 years. Anyway, brought up H's line about "Fear death, but don't be afraid to die." Have we talked about this already? Did he say it that way?? Either way, it was a good conversation. I've been in intensive care m'self (some years ago) and so could relate. Nothing morbid or anything in the discussion and there were others present, too.

Don't think he ever said those words exactly, but his son John ("Bumby") stated that Papa believed that one's attitude in dealing with death was what mattered, not the actual dying.


I think I'm with Woody Allen on this one. He said something like, "I'm not afraid of dying, I just don't want to be there when it happens."

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2019 - 1:35 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

mgh admits he's an Allenesque coward--in a Hemingway thread.

That in itself is a rare breed of courage.

"Boris, you're talking about Mother Russia!"

"She's not my mother! My mother wouldn't let her youngest baby get shrapnel in his gums!"

"I hope they send him to the front lines!"

"Thanks a lot, mom...my mother, folks!"

 
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