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 Posted:   Sep 14, 2020 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

You are a true sport, MM. Such a wonderful thing to find out about Hollywood Studio Orchestra's re-recording on the Zoom and per an earlier response here, it is something how this tidy little score has spawned this many re-recordings in addition to the various OST offerings--and all derived from a non-big screen production. Sort've reminds of the way live TV broadcasts were summarily reproduced onto the silver screen, the teleplays were simply that good.

May I issue a challenge i.e. "commission" another Herrmann piece for re-recording? Namely, "The Stars" from TZ's The Lonely.

(1:22-end)


Submitted for your consideration. wink


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2020 - 5:47 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

a) Is Howard L certifiably insane? Just asking smile

b) are the rest of you certifiably insane? Just asking

c) Howard L has been told the entire score including his beloved Merry-go-Round cue is isolated on the Blu-ray. Has Howard L heard of Blu-ray or is he still living in the VHS days? Just asking.

d) This thread has given me a migraine.

e) What on earth is the Hollywood Studio Orchestra and why are they recording this score?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2020 - 6:10 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Greetings, Cousin Brucie! And take a wild guess as to what track's next on the Homewood Drugstore jukebox!!

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 12:35 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

a) Is Howard L certifiably insane? Just asking smile

b) are the rest of you certifiably insane? Just asking

c) Howard L has been told the entire score including his beloved Merry-go-Round cue is isolated on the Blu-ray. Has Howard L heard of Blu-ray or is he still living in the VHS days? Just asking.

d) This thread has given me a migraine.

e) What on earth is the Hollywood Studio Orchestra and why are they recording this score?



To be honest Bruce, I think we're all insane!

My friends think I'm mad that in a year we're looking at economic collapse due to Covid, climate collapse due to decades of environmental damage, more economic collapse due to Brexit, and a second term of Trump, I'm spending my Facebook feed talking about which is the best recording of a 62 year old film score!!

To your last question though, it's an orchestra assembled by Michael McGehee and they've been recording old Herrmann crime dramas. As to why they did this particular piece, I don't know specifically. It may be simply because they care about it.

I'm glad they're about though, and I'm glad they're doing these old Herrmann scores. I understand La Belle Dame Sans Merci is on their list of upcoming recordings.

Cheers

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 5:36 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

The Twilight Zone complete blu-ray is on sale for $59 at deepdiscount.

The main character in movie SECONDS has the opposite motivation in returning to his youth - to redo his life, not relive it nostalgically. I was still reminded of this episode since he is "reborn" (although not involving time travel) and looks like Gig Young in the mirror here. The point being that Gig Young might not have actually been happy if he successfully stayed.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2020 - 5:24 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Sloan is stunned after the slap in the face. But it is not a thanks-I-needed-that wake-up call, it is more a jolt into sobriety. But a momentary jolt only as his attention now turns to the only one left to talk to: The boy. And he knows just where to find him. He takes off in a final desperate run and heads to The Merry-Go-Round.

(3:22-4:02)



(7:02-7:46)
https://newdiscovery.bandcamp.com/track/the-twilight-zone-walking-distance

Reference has already been made to the close-up and searing strings passage immediately following the slap and said passage's elimination from certain prints with the substitution of the distant sound of the calliope. Whatever. Both re-recordings do that passage and the rest of the cue justice. The sound of the Hollywood SO here remains a keeper.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2020 - 4:25 PM   
 By:   Michael_McGehee   (Member)

To answer the question "Why" I recorded Walking Distance... there are many reasons including that it is beautiful.

But the main reason was that the size of the string orchestra closely matched what I believe Herrmann used in his radio orchestras. I wanted to test if this number of strings would carry the "Melodrams". As a part of the WD session I also recorded a strings only version of "City of Brass" (irony noted) as well as the Prelude from Psycho. None of these were intended for release since my main purpose was recording "new" Herrmann (i.e. unrecorded). However, I was encouraged to release Walking Distance by several notable people and I am happy if anyone enjoys it.

 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2020 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   jkruppa   (Member)

To answer the question "Why" I recorded Walking Distance... there are many reasons including that it is beautiful.

But the main reason was that the size of the string orchestra closely matched what I believe Herrmann used in his radio orchestras. I wanted to test if this number of strings would carry the "Melodrams". As a part of the WD session I also recorded a strings only version of "City of Brass" (irony noted) as well as the Prelude from Psycho. None of these were intended for release since my main purpose was recording "new" Herrmann (i.e. unrecorded). However, I was encouraged to release Walking Distance by several notable people and I am happy if anyone enjoys it.


I for one would love to hear what you've done with "City of Brass."

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2020 - 5:43 PM   
 By:   Michael_McGehee   (Member)

You can hear the full orchestra recording of "City of Brass" (with and without narration) at:

https://newdiscovery.bandcamp.com/album/the-city-of-brass-combo-pack

I have not published the strings only version anywhere.

 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2020 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   jkruppa   (Member)

You can hear the full orchestra recording of "City of Brass" (with and without narration) at:

https://newdiscovery.bandcamp.com/album/the-city-of-brass-combo-pack

I have not published the strings only version anywhere.


Thank you, that's fantastic. Please let us know if you put the strings only version up anywhere.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2020 - 5:39 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

The idyllic setting that is Martin's Summer comes crashing down as both Sloan and the youngster suffer concurrent injuries. The boy is carried off; this act segues into a wholly poetic shot as the lights go down while the children vacate the merry-go-round one by one in silence—except for the underscoring, which turns as soft as the lighting. Martin is left alone to come to grips with the fact that “there is nothing quite like summer and being a kid” and it should never be taken for granted. He is inconsolable.

(4:03-5:37)




(7:47-9:16)
https://newdiscovery.bandcamp.com/track/the-twilight-zone-walking-distance

Unlike Sloan, here the Hollywood SO is at its finest hour. The tempo is right, the strings glimmer, and the sound, once again, is what it is. It's funny how this 3rd re-recording seemed to have come from out of nowhere. Bottom line is that it has come and the cue is better off for it and that's all that matters.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2020 - 11:59 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Oh and as a side note, my ears tell me that a variation of its descending finale crossed over into...the aforementioned “little picture” next on BH's composing agenda:



"The Toys" underscores the moments after Leila (Vera Miles) enters The Bedroom. There would appear to be something of a favorable comparison between the merry-go-round of Martin's youth and Norman's toys of his youth with regard to what Herrmann had in mind in his otherwise “sympathetic” approach to these respective scenes. Just one man's opinion, nothing more. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2020 - 12:48 PM   
 By:   Michael_McGehee   (Member)

Oh and as a side note, my ears tell me that a variation of its descending finale crossed over into...the aforementioned “little picture” next on BH's composing agenda:



"The Toys" underscores the moments after Leila (Vera Miles) enters The Bedroom. There would appear to be something of a favorable comparison between the merry-go-round of Martin's youth and Norman's toys of his youth with regard to what Herrmann had in mind in his otherwise “sympathetic” approach to these respective scenes. Just one man's opinion, nothing more. smile



Yes, Howard, that is a nice observation. Specifically, it is the way the strings are playing Divisi chords.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2020 - 6:48 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Layman speaks and his ears're confirmed by professional music-speak. I learned a new word today: Divisi chords. Much obliged, Michael.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2020 - 6:15 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

“How's the boy, Doc?”
“He'll be all right.”

That, of course, is Sheriff Tate inquiring about injured and unconscious Jem in To Kill A Mockingbird.

"I thought you might want to know the boy will be all right. Doctor says he'll limp some but he'll be all right."

That report, of course, is from “Pop,” to which Martin replies,

“Oh I thank God for that.”



Frank Overton portrayed both Robert “Pop” Sloan in WD and Sheriff “Heck” Tate in TKAM a few years later. As Robert Sloan he was Atticus Finch before Atticus Finch, a man/a father/a Dad of dignity, genuine concern, quiet strength, compassion, and finally, confidence.



Oh is his a wonderful heartfelt performance here in an Elegy to carefree childhood that passes so quickly...

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2020 - 8:49 AM   
 By:   FalkirkBairn   (Member)

Frank Overton's one of those actors whose face is very familiar. That last conversation between pop and his son was quite moving.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2020 - 10:45 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Oh is his a wonderful heartfelt performance here in an Elegy to carefree childhood that passes so quickly...

(5:38-9:12)




(9:17-end)
https://newdiscovery.bandcamp.com/track/the-twilight-zone-walking-distance

...into bumpy adulthood that may just turn out all right if there's a reason to keep looking ahead rather than behind. And brother, do the Tribune FC and Hollywood SO do it here all right. The McNeely's a nice listen to as well, make no mistake, but the pace is slow substantially and the sound level is quite low. Which may not necessarily be a major minus on both counts for an elegiac composition. Nevertheless, the tempo of the Hollywood SO is dead-on to the original's and that aspect has always been a big plus to me.

But here I'm going to be a little more forgiving in that department. The Tribune FC falls somewhere between the McNeely and Hollywood SO tempo-wise and the latter has its customary crystal clear crisp sound, but the Tribune FC has the richest full string orchestra sound of them all and at just the right level. It feels more balanced. The bass does it. This is the performance that stands out for me for this, the heart of Herrmann's score for a sensitive scene that is fully underscored.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2020 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Frank Overton's one of those actors whose face is very familiar. That last conversation between pop and his son was quite moving.

Yes, he's "got that kind of face." wink

 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2020 - 10:58 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)



"Maybe when you go back, Howard, you'll find that there are merry-go-rounds and band concerts where you are. Maybe you haven't been looking in the right place. You've been looking behind you, Howard. Try looking ahead."

 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2020 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Rod Serling's closing narration for Walking Distance remains my favorite Twilight Zone dialogue:

"Martin Sloan, age thirty-six, vice-president in charge of media. Successful in most things, but not in the one effort that all men try at some time in their lives - trying to go home again. And also like all men, perhaps there'll be an occasion - maybe a summer night sometime - when he'll look up from what he's doing and listen to the distant music of a calliope, and hear the voices and the laughter of the people and the places of his past. And perhaps across his mind, there'll flit a little errant wish, that a man might not have to become old, never outgrow the parks and the merry-go-rounds of his youth. And he'll smile then, too, because he'll know that it is just an errant wish, some wisp of memory, not too important really, some laughing ghosts that would cross a man's mind - that are a part of The Twilight Zone."

I will forever exclusively associate Bernard Herrmann's TZ end title with Walking Distance.

 
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