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 Posted:   Aug 7, 2020 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

Exterior shot of high school or college. Bells ring signalling the end of school day. Immediately a hoard of kids rushes out the exits. From what I recall, you had to pack your books and things, leave the class room, go to your locker, maybe to the bathroom as well. Yet in films a hundred kids are already behind the exit doors ready to bust out into the parking lot.

Same thing with people IMMEDIATELY opening the door when you ring the buzzer or knock, indicating they were standing IMMEDIATELY next to the door, just waiting for someone to come over.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 8, 2020 - 12:12 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

...the third act kicks off with the "Han Solo Moment", where a supporting character who's "just in it for the money" cuts and runs right before the climax where the heroes are facing certain doom against overwhelming odds, only to come back when all hope seems lost and give an assist at just the right moment? No one ever rightfully gives this character shit for leaving in the first place afterwards when their presence during the majority of the battle could have saved countless lives (Chicken Run being a rare exception).


To an earlier generation, this was the "Harry Luck" moment. Harry Luck was the character played by Brad Dexter in THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, the only one to bail out when Eli Wallach's "Calvera" caught them all and threw them out of the village. The other six went back, but not Harry. But during the final battle, when "Chris" (Yul Brynner) was pinned down, Harry came charging back into the village to rescue him.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2020 - 6:45 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Nerdy scientists who speaks very fast in a mumbling voice. Supposed to indicate the character is an introvert who's brilliant. Usually seen in Sci Fi movies.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2020 - 7:24 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

When "real" reporters or newscasters play reporters or newscasters in film. You can always tell they're trying to act like they're not acting.

 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2020 - 12:03 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

...there's a "heroic" sacrifice towards the end of a movie that's followed by a minute or two of moping by the other characters, before a contrived Deux Ex Machina is discovered, allowing the sacrificed character to come back to life (or purgatory, or whatever), thus completely nullifying the gravity of their sacrifice? Animated movies pull this shit all the time. One of the few animated movies that didn't do this was with "Bing Bong" in Inside Out, and that's what gave his sacrifice actual meaning ("Take her to the moon for me").

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2020 - 12:13 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

This was bugging me the other day. Characters who stop to sacrifice themselves, because if they go with the fleeing hero or group they say they'll slow them down. But their actual stopping and explaining why they're making the sacrifice takes longer than if they actually just all kept running off. It's infuriating. They cause their own needless death. Just keep going.

 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2020 - 8:08 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

This was bugging me the other day. Characters who stop to sacrifice themselves, because if they go with the fleeing hero or group they say they'll slow them down. But their actual stopping and explaining why they're making the sacrifice takes longer than if they actually just all kept running off. It's infuriating. They cause their own needless death. Just keep going.

^ This, so much. There's always a teary-eyed separation with the hero telling whoever he's trying to sacrifice themselves for to "Just keep going, don't look back...!", and the other person being all, "No, it doesn't have to be like this, just come with me/us...!", and all this shit, and it takes FOREVER. If you have time to deliver this little speech, you could have just gotten away. The only time I allow moments like this is if the decision is quick, surgical, and wordless, maybe done with a meaningful glance, and it's very obvious there's no chance of the hero saving themselves. And if the hero shows up later to reveal they miraculously survived, I hate these scenes even MORE. Shameless manipulation of the audiences' emotions only to have said "sacrifice" rendered utterly meaningless. If the hero is gonna sacrifice themselves for the "greater good", then they actually have to DIE.

 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2020 - 8:16 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

...a character in the midst of a war or action scene has a spontaneous expression of "Premature Celebration" when they've done something particularly impressive, only to get gravely wounded or killed outright mere seconds later? Watched Starship Troopers again the other day, and Dina Meyer's Dizzy does a quintessential example of this.



Wait until you're safely AWAY from the battlefield before cheerleading yourself.

 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2020 - 9:23 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

...there's a "heroic" sacrifice towards the end of a movie that's followed by a minute or two of moping by the other characters, before a contrived Deux Ex Machina is discovered, allowing the sacrificed character to come back to life (or purgatory, or whatever), thus completely nullifying the gravity of their sacrifice? Animated movies pull this shit all the time. One of the few animated movies that didn't do this was with "Bing Bong" in Inside Out, and that's what gave his sacrifice actual meaning ("Take her to the moon for me").

This annoys the hell out of me. Without real lose there's nothing to invest in. Your right, its done countless times in animation.

An exception as you said was Inside Out and its why I found the film very moving. The Secret of NIMH is one of the greatest animated films ever. Three characters die on screen and stay dead!

Sadly this is now common practice in live action movies too. No one ever stays dead anymore. (Spock, Steve Trevors, etc) This undermines the emotional impact of the film and makes the personal investment in the film hollow.




 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2020 - 11:08 AM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Movies in which a writer character can't just be a fairly minor one; no, he has to be a Pulitzer Prize winner. Or a film director character or an actress character aren't just fairly prestigious but have to be Oscar winners! (But often these said characters are not living the kind of lives someone that famous would be in rl.)

On a similar note, the young Paul Newman as the most unlikely Nobel Prize winner for Literature ever. (Granted THE PRIZE is meant to be tongue-in-cheek...)

 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2020 - 11:12 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

This was bugging me the other day. Characters who stop to sacrifice themselves, because if they go with the fleeing hero or group they say they'll slow them down. But their actual stopping and explaining why they're making the sacrifice takes longer than if they actually just all kept running off. It's infuriating. They cause their own needless death. Just keep going.

This. Good spot

 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2020 - 11:54 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)


Sadly this is now common practice in live action movies too. No one ever stays dead anymore. (Spock, Steve Trevors, etc) This undermines the emotional impact of the film and makes the personal investment in the film hollow.


The CW DC comics shows actually do kill off characters...only to bring them back a season or so later as an "alternate universe" doppelganger, played by the same actor with a new haircut and/or a doofy accent. It's like these actors get sick of playing the same role for years on end, yet don't want to give up the security of a regular paycheck, so this is the compromise. When the MCU starts up again post-Covid, expect to see Tony Stark brought back as a clean-shaven Universe #47 version just so Robert Downey, Jr. can cash another very large check.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2020 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

Doom Patrol has a decent actress doing a bad cockney child accent that wouldn't pass as real for anyone from the UK. She also said "hide and go seek" which is very American. It's just "Hide and Seek". That would probably baffle an American though.

Utopia was a decent show but they fudged a big final scene. They had an unecessary explosion to cover people running away from a car. But it only works from the camera angle. In reality they'd be highly visible making their escape. Also they have a warehouse that seemingly has only one entrance for the bad guys but the good guys also use a second entrance to escape from. How would the baddies who work there not thinkbto use the other entrance. Also the goodies smash up a warehouse and it has to take maybe an hour but the baddies actions outside seem to cover minutes. So there's time fudging there. It seemed easier to write well and somewhat realistically than what they did.

 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2020 - 1:01 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Ruining bitter sweet endings. We can't make the kiddies (or adults) cry as they leave the theater. Or feel moved by anything. Two recent examples are HTTYD 3 and the Live Action Pete's Dragon.

In HTTYD 3 Hiccup and Toothless had a very moving departure. It was the perfect ending but they had to ruin it by jumping ahead years later and have them meeting up again with their children and pups.

Similar example in Pete's Dragon, Pete and Elliot say their goodbyes, its was best for both of them. Jump ahead in time and Pete and gang travel North to reunite with Elliot and the other dragons.

Will never see another ending like E.T. again!

 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2020 - 7:31 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

...there are too many lightning flashes during a thunderstorm? No matter how violent a thunderstorm I've been through, the lightning flashes and subsequent peals of thunder are spaced at least 30 seconds to a minute apart, yet in movies, you get lightning flashing so often it's like a strobe light in a 1970's disco. Watched Dressed To Kill again tonight, and during the climax in Michael Caine's office, there had to have been about seventy lightning flashes over the course of maybe five minutes of screentime. Are the lighting people getting paid by the flash?



 
 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2020 - 10:21 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

Actually, in Saskatchewan I've seen lightning strikes that are once every few seconds and the storm goes on for like an hour. I wouldn't believe it if I hadn't seen it.

 
 Posted:   Oct 3, 2020 - 12:56 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

The way barrels and containers that actors lift or move are clearly empty but they are exaggerrating the strain to make it seem heavy. Its almost clown-like mime.
Seen this a lot in 50s westerns especially. I understand they dont want a lead actor to put their back out but i think id insist on some weight just to replicate heavy.

 
 Posted:   Oct 3, 2020 - 5:21 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

The way barrels and containers that actors lift or move are clearly empty but they are exaggerrating the strain to make it seem heavy. Its almost clown-like mime.
Seen this a lot in 50s westerns especially. I understand they dont want a lead actor to put their back out but i think id insist on some weight just to replicate heavy.


Not just heavy items. Cups of coffee and cardboard boxes are clearly empty and contain no weight.

 
 Posted:   Oct 3, 2020 - 5:21 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Actually, in Saskatchewan I've seen lightning strikes that are once every few seconds and the storm goes on for like an hour. I wouldn't believe it if I hadn't seen it.

Ive never experienced this and it storms a lot where I'm from.

 
 Posted:   Oct 3, 2020 - 5:25 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

...there are too many lightning flashes during a thunderstorm? No matter how violent a thunderstorm I've been through, the lightning flashes and subsequent peals of thunder are spaced at least 30 seconds to a minute apart, yet in movies, you get lighting flashing so often it's like a strobe light in a 1970's disco. Watched Dressed To Kill again tonight, and during the climax in Michael Caine's office, there had to have been about seventy lightning flashes over the course of maybe five minutes of screentime. Are the lighting people getting paid by the flash?


Yeah, its gotten pretty ridiculous and yes its like they're flashing a strobe light. I remember lightning and thunder flashing every half a second in Deathtrap.

 
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