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 Posted:   Oct 15, 2020 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

...a movie set in the past will indicate it by plastering a poster for a noteworthy movie of that particular year on a kid's bedroom wall? Watching The Haunting Of Bly Manor on Netflix (primarily set in 1987), and there's a Monster Squad poster on Miles' bedroom wall, and in flashback to the lead actress' childhood in the early 70's, there's a Golden Voyage Of Sinbad poster. Where are these kids GETTING these posters? It was not easy to get an authentic one-sheet back in the day (unless you had an "in" with the local cinema management), and since Monster Squad hit theaters in August of '87, the idea a ten-year-old would have access to that poster at that time is very unlikely (the Star Trek: The Motion Picture one is easier to accept).

And these one-sheets are always in mint, fresh-from-the-art-department condition, sometimes not even folded! No scotch tape, no tears. no tattered edges.

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2020 - 6:57 AM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

The same with loaded dice, they may have off-centre weights inside, but they're not going to land on the right number every time, just a bit more than they would have done, but it's every time in movies.

Only Questor had the means and the skill to pull that off.

 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 12:03 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

When villains/thieves abandon their getaway van and overalls in some underpass and toss a bomb in the back. Ludicrously they are barely a few feet away when they detonate it with a remote in their hand. The shot is always of them walking towards camera with the explosion flames behind them.
No singed clothes, no blast throwing them off their feet or bits of van tearing thru them. So naff.


Would you believe spotted this awful cliche again in 2020 vin diesel film Bloodshot.


Just saw this twice at the end of The Punisher when Thomas Jane is setting off various bombs with remotes.

 
 Posted:   Oct 21, 2020 - 8:54 PM   
 By:   Michael Scorefan   (Member)

A dream sequence occurs and the character who is dreaming walks up to someone, oftentimes a deceased love one, and says "is this a dream?". Although I don't often remember my dreams, I certainly don't remember being self-aware enough that I wondered out loud if I was in a dream. Has anyone else?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 21, 2020 - 10:21 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

...& while I'm thinking about it: games of poker in movies. It's always amazing hands; four aces beats four kings or a full house. I've never played the game , but I'm sure these amazing winning hands hardly ever happen.


That's right. I'd give anything to see a poker showdown where the bad guy lays down his cards and announces "nothing, King high," and the good guy triumphantly says "pair of threes."

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2020 - 4:15 AM   
 By:   Rick15   (Member)

I hate it when someone jumps down a flight of stairs/off a high ledge/somewhere high...

and make no sound at all when they land. Especially when the "bad guys" are nearby.

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2020 - 5:19 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

...& while I'm thinking about it: games of poker in movies. It's always amazing hands; four aces beats four kings or a full house. I've never played the game , but I'm sure these amazing winning hands hardly ever happen.


That's right. I'd give anything to see a poker showdown where the bad guy lays down his cards and announces "nothing, King high," and the good guy triumphantly says "pair of threes."


Dats funny

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2020 - 5:22 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

A dream sequence occurs and the character who is dreaming walks up to someone, oftentimes a deceased love one, and says "is this a dream?". Although I don't often remember my dreams, I certainly don't remember being self-aware enough that I wondered out loud if I was in a dream. Has anyone else?

Nope. Next to impossible i think. Thats the whole point of dreams, you're along for the ride in real time in your head.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2020 - 7:42 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

Yeah, I have some weird dreams. I've always been in the habit of waking up around 3am, it doesn't bother me as I get off again quite easily, but it means that I remember the dream I was having quite vividly, of course it all fades quite quickly in the morning. What I do remember is, sometimes I'm in them, sometimes I'm just watching, & sometimes both, at the same time. No matter how weird & bizarre the dream is, it all seems quite boring & normal at the time.

What I do find strange, is that someone from the past appears in your dream, someone who you haven't even thought about for forty years (it happened to me last night). To quote Toyah Willcox...It's a mystery.

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2020 - 8:00 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)


What I do find strange, is that someone from the past appears in your dream, someone who you haven't even thought about for forty years (it happened to me last night). To quote Toyah Willcox...It's a mystery.


I have dreams like that all the time. Something pops up and I can't imagine what triggered it.

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2020 - 2:01 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

They steal lines from other, better movies.

Wolverine

"How did you know there was a pool down there?!!"
"I didnt."

 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2020 - 1:32 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

A dying soldier or cowboy, held in the arms of the hero, always lasts exactly long enough to say their crucial final words - usually an apology ...then collapses dead.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2020 - 2:43 PM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

A dying soldier or cowboy, held in the arms of the hero, always lasts exactly long enough to say their crucial final words - usually an apology ...then collapses dead.

I've read a few books about D-Day, with descriptions of wounded soldiers screaming out in absolute agony, as you would do if a bullet or a piece of shrapnel had just torn into your body...but of course in films they just lay there, maybe with gritted teeth, & they're able to whisper a quiet sentence to end on. And of course in a war film or a western, people attack, they're shot, & they all lay there dead, whereas most of them would be wounded. But sod it, I do love war & western films.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2020 - 3:58 PM   
 By:   fmfan1   (Member)

....so many films pull from the same, limited list of what a school is like.

The teacher is almost always standing at the front of the room lecturing. The teacher's desk is almost always in the front center. The single entrance door is always to the teacher's immediate left. Students are almost always sitting in columns at matching desks (where's the trapezoidal table?). It's almost always teacher-directed (no cooperative grouping here).

Don't get me started on class sizes, where it's usually about 16 max.

If English, the teacher is deeply examining a novel, play, or poem (no diagramming sentences or learning how to write a citation). If Math, there are complicated looking equations (but where is the drill and kill fraction worksheet?). If Science, they are either dissecting a frog or having a science fair. If PE, it's usually dodgeball, basketball (shirts vs. skins), or otherwise some mismatch of playing football/cheerleading/watching from the stands/walking around and talking and not participating at all. Why are these students so rarely seen in ceramics, engineering, or macroeconomics?

Why are school cafeterias never the most common type? Row after row of large folding tables with about 10 students on each side, with the students sitting there crammed together for the entire lunch period?

(I guess we could argue that most films have a single vision of any setting: a hospital, a morgue, a newsroom, etc.)

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2020 - 10:12 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

(I guess we could argue that most films have a single vision of any setting: a hospital, a morgue, a newsroom, etc.)


Even set decorators have their clichés, I guess.

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

(I guess we could argue that most films have a single vision of any setting: a hospital, a morgue, a newsroom, etc.)


Even set decorators have their clichés, I guess.


Interesting observation. I guess its easier to build a set off of existing plans. Or perhaps the studios have basic sets like classrooms already built on their lots and their loaned out to whatever production needs that setting?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 4:17 PM   
 By:   fmfan1   (Member)

I bet there are budgetary reasons for not having creative or different sets!


....so many films pull from the same, limited list of what a school is like.

The teacher is almost always standing at the front of the room lecturing. The teacher's desk is almost always in the front center. The single entrance door is always to the teacher's immediate left. Students are almost always sitting in columns at matching desks (where's the trapezoidal table?). It's almost always teacher-directed (no cooperative grouping here).

Don't get me started on class sizes, where it's usually about 16 max.

If English, the teacher is deeply examining a novel, play, or poem (no diagramming sentences or learning how to write a citation). If Math, there are complicated looking equations (but where is the drill and kill fraction worksheet?). If Science, they are either dissecting a frog or having a science fair. If PE, it's usually dodgeball, basketball (shirts vs. skins), or otherwise some mismatch of playing football/cheerleading/watching from the stands/walking around and talking and not participating at all. Why are these students so rarely seen in ceramics, engineering, or macroeconomics?

Why are school cafeterias never the most common type? Row after row of large folding tables with about 10 students on each side, with the students sitting there crammed together for the entire lunch period?

(I guess we could argue that most films have a single vision of any setting: a hospital, a morgue, a newsroom, etc.)

 
 Posted:   Nov 5, 2020 - 1:10 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

In westerns where there is a condemned man in a cell, he can always hear the gallows being built (sawing, banging) and can always see ithe gallows from his cell window.

(Never understood why towns didnt have permanent gallows on outskirts of town, always have to have one built for the plot by the town carpenter)

This psychological torture was lampooned in the comedy western Evil Roy Slade, the guys building the gallows are discussing having a picnic for the hanging and right outside the villainous Slade's cell a hawker is shouting "Get your Evil Roy Slade hanging dolls" - an action man type doll with a noose round its neck, "...fully equipped with a head that comes right off for the hanging..!" big grin

 
 Posted:   Nov 5, 2020 - 4:44 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

A dying soldier or cowboy, held in the arms of the hero, always lasts exactly long enough to say their crucial final words - usually an apology ...then collapses dead.

I've read a few books about D-Day, with descriptions of wounded soldiers screaming out in absolute agony, as you would do if a bullet or a piece of shrapnel had just torn into your body...but of course in films they just lay there, maybe with gritted teeth, & they're able to whisper a quiet sentence to end on. And of course in a war film or a western, people attack, they're shot, & they all lay there dead, whereas most of them would be wounded. But sod it, I do love war & western films.


Excellent observations! I've also read about this as well, and talked with those whom served in war (my dad was on Luzon island in WWII) and it was so often the case that they were really just boys, age-wise, and would die while crying and calling for their mother, etc., (how does witnessing that not haunt you forever?).
With all its faults The Quick and the Dead scene in which Leo's character died whining and crying was probably closer to reality.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 5, 2020 - 5:55 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

In westerns where there is a condemned man in a cell, he can always hear the gallows being built (sawing, banging) and can always see ithe gallows from his cell window.

(Never understood why towns didnt have permanent gallows on outskirts of town, always have to have one built for the plot by the town carpenter)


Yeah, such a western cliché, if fact I can't think of a western where a prisoner is going to be hanged where he's not looking out of the bars of the window & seeing the gallows being built (or at least hearing it). And those gallows are always so well made, I reckon the Swiss immigrant carpenter, with the family name of Ikea, has it all stored in flatpack smile

 
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