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 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 3:45 AM   
 By:   Lush-Romantic Strings   (Member)

You would hear Goldenthal scoring, not see that. Although perhaps you could see maybe some recording sessions photography or documentation!

You wouldn't hear Goldenthal scoring, for presumably he'd be scoring by writing down the score via pencil and paper (or however he works). You'd hear only the final result after the performance is recorded and you listen to it. wink


Gudnadóttir wrote this one by hand too!.

smile

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 5:02 AM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

You would hear Goldenthal scoring, not see that. Although perhaps you could see maybe some recording sessions photography or documentation!

You wouldn't hear Goldenthal scoring, for presumably he'd be scoring by writing down the score via pencil and paper (or however he works). You'd hear only the final result after the performance is recorded and you listen to it. wink


Gudnadóttir wrote this one by hand too!.

smile


She uses Steinberg Cubase. And while she might have sketched ideas melodically on manuscript it’s doubtful she wrote it all out the old fashioned way. Even Goldenthal used sequencers in the 90s for many of his scores. Writing out scores in this age of right deadlines is just not feasible. I finished a concert commission this week that I’d been working on for the last 5 months and a good week of was just dedicated to engraving (parts, including piano/vocal score). It’s a laborious task which is why film composers have orchestrators and copyists. They don’t have the time to do everything like concert composers do.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 5:58 AM   
 By:   Hurdy Gurdy   (Member)

I would like to add that my positive comments above are based solely on hearing the score while watching the film in the cinema.
I've just played the score, via YouTube, and it's not something I would ever choose to listen to standalone (apart from a handful of tracks*).
For me, it's just one of those film scores best left in the film (although I know many people dig this type of score as a listen to and that's cool).
I would agree with many points in Jon's review, if we were just talking about the album release, as a cold listening experience.
But he also slates the film, which I enjoyed very much.
My appreciation of the score was borne out of my enjoyment of the film.



* 1. "Haunt" 3:45
2. "Gondolas" 2:47
4. "No Music Without Her" 2:46
7. "St. Louis" 3:09
8. "Pipes" 2:13
10. "Money in the Mattress" 4:19

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 6:05 AM   
 By:   Lush-Romantic Strings   (Member)

You would hear Goldenthal scoring, not see that. Although perhaps you could see maybe some recording sessions photography or documentation!

You wouldn't hear Goldenthal scoring, for presumably he'd be scoring by writing down the score via pencil and paper (or however he works). You'd hear only the final result after the performance is recorded and you listen to it. wink


Gudnadóttir wrote this one by hand too!.

smile


She uses Steinberg Cubase. And while she might have sketched ideas melodically on manuscript it’s doubtful she wrote it all out the old fashioned way. Even Goldenthal used sequencers in the 90s for many of his scores. Writing out scores in this age of right deadlines is just not feasible. I finished a concert commission this week that I’d been working on for the last 5 months and a good week of was just dedicated to engraving (parts, including piano/vocal score). It’s a laborious task which is why film composers have orchestrators and copyists. They don’t have the time to do everything like concert composers do.



You´re right, of course. I was talking about sketching. Like you say, it´s not really about the lack of skill (at least not if you are classically trained), but the lack of time. Even Marianelli uses software, and he, like Hildur, had a lot of formal training.


Which makes me wonder... how many of the current pool of composers working in Hollywood have studied composition, couterpoint, harmony, theory and the like in an actual conservatory, and thus are "classically trained"?. Are they the minority?. Or not really?.


 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 8:12 AM   
 By:   No Respectable Gentleman   (Member)

I've rarely seen a popcorn film so inadequately served by its score. It's staggering that a composer charged a fee for this. Beyond belief, too, si that film reviewers who routinely don't notice scores would praise this one -- such is the tryanny of fashion over substance.

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 8:13 AM   
 By:   No Respectable Gentleman   (Member)

As for the film, I thought the cockatoo was the killer. Would have made more sense, too.

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 1:55 PM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)



Which makes me wonder... how many of the current pool of composers working in Hollywood have studied composition, couterpoint, harmony, theory and the like in an actual conservatory, and thus are "classically trained"?. Are they the minority?. Or not really?.


That’s a good question. Hard to know. I can tell you most orchestrators and copyists have had formal training. They’ve had to.

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 2:24 PM   
 By:   Spinmeister   (Member)

Being classically trained is one thing, being a gifted dramatist is quite another, and this is where a good many of the new breed of composers simply fall flat on their faces in front of me.

They're shit at story-telling.

Göransson's Oppenheimer being a prime example.

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 3:32 PM   
 By:   Erik Woods   (Member)

Being classically trained is one thing, being a gifted dramatist is quite another, and this is where a good many of the new breed of composers simply fall flat on their faces in front of me.

They're shit at story-telling.


^THIS!^

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2023 - 3:51 PM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

Being classically trained is one thing, being a gifted dramatist is quite another, and this is where a good many of the new breed of composers simply fall flat on their faces in front of me.

They're shit at story-telling.

Göransson's Oppenheimer being a prime example.


Agreed. Technique without sensitivity to story telling isn’t good. All of the greats had that innate dramatic sensibility along with an excellent musical vocabulary.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2023 - 11:30 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Good to see the sharply contrasted responses here. I'm on the fence. Appreciated the textured understatement, but heard nothing that would make me want to go out and buy the album to hear the music again. Today we have another option: to sample the album on a service like Spotify. How many of us remember the listening booths they used to have for sampling in record stores? (How many remember record stores!) An early scene in STRANGERS ON A TRAIN is set in such a booth.

The opening theme had a quasi-Gregorian cast, didn't it? I suppose the idea was to preface the spiritualist aspect of the story.

I found the low volume of both music and whispered dialogue to be unsatisfactory. A problem of the theater or of my aging ears?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2023 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Forgive the pedantry, but I'm sure this will be useful for some people:

If you can't find the symbol ð (known as "eth"), the substitute is simply "th": Guthnadottir.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2023 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   Prince Damian   (Member)

Forgive the pedantry, but I'm sure this will be useful for some people:

If you can't find the symbol ð (known as "eth"), the substitute is simply "th": Guthnadottir.



You are forgiven. Just thought I'd mention that I don't think I've had to write her name, once, yet.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2023 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   Prince Damian   (Member)

Forgive the pedantry, but I'm sure this will be useful for some people:

If you can't find the symbol ð (known as "eth"), the substitute is simply "th": Guthnadottir.



You are forgiven. Just thought I'd mention that I don't think I've had to write her name, once, yet.

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2023 - 3:02 PM   
 By:   spook   (Member)

Interesting reading all this. Still not seen the film yet but Hurdy’s comment about liking it in the film but not neccessarily as a stand alone listening experience…. Isn’t that the point? If it works on its own, great but obviously Brannagh wanted a change in his usual style, not having Doyle onboard and rather than a Doyle like score, we have this total change of pace. Personally i love it as a stand alone listen but i listen to a lot of horror scores that wouldn’t get the time of day from a lot on this Board. How much is disappointment with the score against disappointment it wasn’t Doyle's? Does the new style offer a similar split in thoughts like say LADYHAWK did?

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2023 - 6:51 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

Does the new style offer a similar split in thoughts like say LADYHAWK did?

It's the inevitability of this hobby and what everyone finds compelling about it. We all seek a different element of this and for some the standalone listen is the valuable piece; for others it is whether it works to the picture; and for many how enjoyable is it in both settings. I'm a lover of music in general. Typically I listen to many scores before I see the film because I just want to hear new acoustic or electronic music, whatever it will be. And I haven't seen this film but I have enjoyed the score on its own because it sets a mood for me that I much desire now: the changing of seasons and the spirit of Halloween. For that, job accomplished if you ask me. I can't speak for others but I always feel disappointed that they continue to dislike most anything.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2023 - 10:03 PM   
 By:   Willgoldnewtonbarrygrusin   (Member)

Does the new style offer a similar split in thoughts like say LADYHAWK did?

It's the inevitability of this hobby and what everyone finds compelling about it. We all seek a different element of this and for some the standalone listen is the valuable piece; for others it is whether it works to the picture; and for many how enjoyable is it in both settings. I'm a lover of music in general. Typically I listen to many scores before I see the film because I just want to hear new acoustic or electronic music, whatever it will be. And I haven't seen this film but I have enjoyed the score on its own because it sets a mood for me that I much desire now: the changing of seasons and the spirit of Halloween. For that, job accomplished if you ask me. I can't speak for others but I always feel disappointed that they continue to dislike most anything.


Thank you once again for a measured, thoughtful and meaningful response.

Always a pleasure to read your comments.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2023 - 12:11 AM   
 By:   rugo   (Member)

Nothing has been stated as to why exactly Doyle wasn't involved, has it? Regardless, as versatile a composer as he is, I'm thinking he could have delivered something along the lines of what HG has conjured, which sadly doesn't do it for me. I find it nondescript, and I don't mean to imply that it's lacking as a type of descriptive music, which of course isn't necessary nor especially trendy; I simply don't find it very interesting or engaging, even at creating an atmospheric mood. Calling it bland seems somewhat harsh, but there you go. I'll see the movie soon enough and maybe that'll alter my perspective, or at least provide an appreciation for it within its intended context, but from the character that the music is imbued with, I'm wondering if my reaction might be that the movie would have been better served with no score at all, even had it been one by Doyle.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2023 - 8:19 AM   
 By:   spook   (Member)

Does the new style offer a similar split in thoughts like say LADYHAWK did?

It's the inevitability of this hobby and what everyone finds compelling about it. We all seek a different element of this and for some the standalone listen is the valuable piece; for others it is whether it works to the picture; and for many how enjoyable is it in both settings. I'm a lover of music in general. Typically I listen to many scores before I see the film because I just want to hear new acoustic or electronic music, whatever it will be. And I haven't seen this film but I have enjoyed the score on its own because it sets a mood for me that I much desire now: the changing of seasons and the spirit of Halloween. For that, job accomplished if you ask me. I can't speak for others but I always feel disappointed that they continue to dislike most anything.


Thank you once again for a measured, thoughtful and meaningful response.

Always a pleasure to read your comments.


Seconded

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2023 - 8:26 AM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

Nothing has been stated as to why exactly Doyle wasn't involved, has it?

Most of the conversation has been around his inability to find the scheduling around his work on the King's coronation obligations.

 
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