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 Posted:   Oct 11, 2014 - 5:48 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Maybe some of you can post what I call REVISITING SOUNDTRACK X topics. I don’t care if any “revisiting” scores were previously discussed. These topics would perhaps be about new discoveries you’ve made while returning to a certain score. Maybe the topics would just be about the joy this revisiting has brought the listener. Such topics might educate others. Maybe no one will respond, but perhaps you may engender curiosity about a score or just find comradeship in your sharing.

For the last two days, I have revisited Jerry Goldsmith’s LONELY ARE THE BRAVE. What a marvelous score. Also, I did make some new discoveries. I always loved the main theme so I usually just listened to track two, the main title, and then skipped to track 21 called “Run For It” to hear the main theme beautifully integrated into a fabulous action track. The main theme reminds me a lot of the theme from the newly released RIO CONCHOS. Different melody but somewhat similar in orchestrations. It is a great theme that Goldsmith deftly and brilliantly expands and varies throughout the whole score. First it is a straight main theme. Then it becomes a jaunty almost comedic theme. Throughout much of the score, he slows the theme to perfectly depict the ever evolving loneliness and isolation of the Kirk Douglas character. If you loved "The River” from RIO CONCHOS, you will love “Run For It.” It’s Goldsmith action music at its best. Some music in this track emulates “telegraphing” sounds as the law closes in on Douglas. Finally, when Douglas rides through the trees, Goldsmith gives us a galvanizing, rousing rendition of his main theme. I just wish this part was longer or used more often.

What I discovered was that this is not a monothematic score. Track 3 introduces at least two, perhaps three themes, and again it has a fun, stirring variation of his main theme. I can’t stop playing this track, and I’m sorry I missed it for so many years. It is a great album by a masterful composer. I believe that this is the score that Herrmann heard during rehearsals, and he told Goldsmith the music was too good for the movie. Actually I thought the movie was well-done enhanced by masterful music.

 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2014 - 8:10 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Thank you for revisiting this one so eloquently, Joan. It is one if my favorite Goldsmith scores and made even better by accompanying one of my favorite films that he scored.

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 5:44 AM   
 By:   gmcohan   (Member)

LONELY ARE THE BRAVE is far and away my favorite Goldsmith score. "Run for it" is a magnificent cue. I had waited decades for its release and thanks to Varese it happened.

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 6:06 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

This is one of my two favorite scores; the other one is Rio Conchos. Lonely are the Brave is the one that hooked me on Goldsmith. I had the same reaction after hearing both scores; I walked out of the theater and went to the music store and asked about a soundtrack. You know the answer I got. With Rio Conchos, I only had to wait for 25 years when Doug released the rerecording of it. Lonely Are The Brave I had to wait 47 years for. Both were worth it. By the way, I think that second theme used in "Run For It" was used again as the theme for The Loner.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 8:35 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Glad to hear that others love this score. Thanks for chiming in. Yes, I also believe The Loner used the theme from this movie.

It was a long wait for this CD, but the cliché says, "Good things are worth waiting for."

(mgh, 47 years? Yikes, that makes us Baby Boomers. We will meet someday in our wheelchairs.wink)

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 10:26 AM   
 By:   gmcohan   (Member)

Glad to hear that others love this score. Thanks for chiming in. Yes, I also believe The Loner used the theme from this movie.

It was a long wait for this CD, but the cliché says, "Good things are worth waiting for."

(mgh, 47 years? Yikes, that makes us Baby Boomers. We will meet someday in our wheelchairs.wink)

I saw this movie in North Hollywood back in 1962 at age 20. I stayed to see it a second time.I loved the film and loved the score. A week later DR. NO made its appearance. What a great summer for movies that was! If we don't meet in wheelchairs, I'll see you up there.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 1:29 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

gm, I hope I make it "up there."

I admit that I haven't seen this film in many years. Hope TCM shows it some time when I'm around.

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 4:48 PM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

Joan and mgh, since we are the "River" triplets, I had to chime in here. But this time with a counter-view.

Much as I love Rio Conchos, I have tended to think of "Lonely..." as one of Goldsmith's last "early" scores where he is still developing his signature sound, and haven't given it much attention. But thanks to this thread, and to support my two amigos, I'm giving it another listen right now (I mean, it's in my iPod, so I'm still a card-carrying member....)

This is probably because I'm not sold on the movie - I find it tiresomely "serious" and self-righteous in the way of a number of mid-century Hollywood films. This almost always puts me off even if the movies are quite fine in other respects, as this one certainly is. (Face in the Crowd is another example, I start out wanting to like it and then I become quite irritated by its attitude.)

So for me this really is a revisiting, but with more attention this time.

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 5:19 PM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

Joan and mgh, since we are the "River" triplets, I had to chime in here. But this time with a counter-view.

Much as I love Rio Conchos, I have tended to think of "Lonely..." as one of Goldsmith's last "early" scores where he is still developing his signature sound, and haven't given it much attention. But thanks to this thread, and to support my two amigos, I'm giving it another listen right now (I mean, it's in my iPod, so I'm still a card-carrying member....)

This is probably because I'm not sold on the movie - I find it tiresomely "serious" and self-righteous in the way of a number of mid-century Hollywood films. This almost always puts me off even if the movies are quite fine in other respects, as this one certainly is. (Face in the Crowd is another example, I start out wanting to like it and then I become quite irritated by its attitude.)

So for me this really is a revisiting, but with more attention this time.


I hope it works for you, Sean; it is a great film and a great score.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 5:41 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Like mgh, I hope that it works for you, Sean. Like I said, I made a new discovery in track 3 and still love track 2 and Run Through It which is I think track 21.

If we are still triplets, I'd really appreciate it if you two would find a better triplet picture. You two really don't look ruggedly handsome in that picture, and I look like an idiot. wink

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

Since there are so many cues on the Varese release, I appreciate you highlighting these particular tracks, Joan. Everything you say is right about these.

It may be that I have come to this score late in my Jerry G. listening, since it features so many of the ideas and approaches he continued to hone later, it feels familiar when of course it was quite new when originally released. I think another reason this is lower on my list is that I'm not as fond of the main tune. This is a mysterious thing that I've long noticed - how easily I prefer one theme over another by the same composer, even in the same genre.

Anyway I'll give it some more attention.

And I love our picture...why, you're a beautiful actress who is playing one half one of the best song writing teams ever whose husband is played by Oscar Levant. Of COURSE you look silly.

while I look, well, I'll let my avatar speak for me.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 6:37 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

My motto is each to his/her own. Sean, if this CD doesn't resonate with you, that's fine. Actually, my favorite Goldsmith western theme is the main theme from Take A Hard Ride.

And your avatar speaks volumes!! I just want us all to look...well...errr...uhmmm.. How about erudite?

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 7:53 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Yes, I understand the main theme issue. It's a more subtle one and doesn't wow you right away but keep listening because it grows on you. It's now one of my favorites, a powerful and emotional sibling of Jerry's later Rambo theme. Strong yet very melancholic and moving. I must say however my favorite tack of the score is #11, Worlds Apart...for the sort-of love story of the film. Full of such poignant regret. One of his best cues ever IMO.

To me this score is 100% mature Goldsmith, a five star masterpiece which stands up well against any of his later masterpieces.

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 8:10 PM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

Plus, a bit of the theme sounds like, or is harmonized like, Star Trek TMP's main theme. I'm not listening right now, so I can't say exactly what, I'll try to figure out later.

Love those composer thumbprints all over their work.

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2014 - 12:22 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

I will suggest track 3 3M81 (isn't that catchy?); the first half has the orchestra going all out with the theme. Wonderful stuff.

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2014 - 1:08 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

If we are still triplets, I'd really appreciate it if you two would find a better triplet picture. You two really don't look ruggedly handsome in that picture, and I look like an idiot. wink

And I never liked the dress on me.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2014 - 8:47 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Yes, mgh, track 3 is one of my favorites. (And that dress on you suggests a need for a better stylist.)

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2014 - 9:12 AM   
 By:   stroppy   (Member)

Great score. A real preview as to what Goldsmith would become in later years.

If we are going to have a "revisit" thread then have another listen to his 1978 score for the film, "The Last Great Train Robbery". You can hear excerpts on YouTube.

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2014 - 9:13 AM   
 By:   stroppy   (Member)

Accidental double post

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2014 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Welcome, Stroppy. I can't revisit The Last Great Train Robbery because I don't own it or really know it. If you want to revisit it, please do start a thread on it. I'll check it out at youtube.

 
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