Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2015 - 9:14 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

If you haven't read this 1994 interview, read it -- it's quite enjoyable:

http://www.runmovies.eu/?p=9835
(is this page archived on archive.org? Rampant internet censorship at the library has the Way Way Back machine blocked and it doesn't function properly in any proxy website that I have found so far)

NEW Soundtrack! magazine website link:
https://cnmsarchive.wordpress.com/

EDIT: No new page for the Len Engel story.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2015 - 11:22 PM   
 By:   RonBurbella   (Member)

Having lived through that time, I found the whole discussion very nostalgically entertaining, especially with Nick's enumerating the reasons why people complained about releases.

One of Nick Redman's remarks that I thought especially hit the mark was:

"People call me complaining about hiss, like hiss is the worst possible thing they can imagine. Hiss, to me, means that real people played this music. The completely silent and sterile DDD format has an inhuman quality about it. Again, this feeling of people who don’t really care about the quality of the music – they only care about the quality of the sound."

Read this all the way through. It's good.

Ron Burbella


 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2015 - 11:45 PM   
 By:   Smitty   (Member)


One of Nick Redman's remarks that I thought especially hit the mark was:

"People call me complaining about hiss, like hiss is the worst possible thing they can imagine. Hiss, to me, means that real people played this music. The completely silent and sterile DDD format has an inhuman quality about it. Again, this feeling of people who don’t really care about the quality of the music – they only care about the quality of the sound."

Read this all the way through. It's good.

Ron Burbella


Absolutely, and we still see it often. I have my limits when it comes to sound quality, probably much more stringent than most Golden Age soundtrack listeners, but it seems that a lot of people take issue with even the smallest imperfections. They somehow ignore the music and mostly hear the thin layer of noise and/or slight distortions.

Many of these people's judgment is odd, too. As I think Bruce Kimmel once said, there are a lot of 60s and 70s recordings that put common, beloved 80s recordings to absolute shame with regard to detail despite many saying the inverse. I couldn't agree more.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2015 - 3:28 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

If you haven't read this 1994 interview, read it -- it's quite enjoyable:

http://www.runmovies.eu/?p=9835


That bought back some memories. I can remember reading it many years ago in Soundtrack magazine. A lot has happened since that interview, a lot of soundtrack projects thought to be impossible have come to pass. I remember feeling very disappointed reading about the state of The Egyptian tapes, & what a fantastic surprise it was when FSM announced it...& then re-released with more music & sounding better! There's still a few fifties Fox soundtracks that I'd love (which is where Bruce Kimmel comes in). And about 95% of my CD collection comes from the analogue days, & they sound great.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2015 - 3:44 AM   
 By:   the_limited_edition   (Member)

That part makes no sense:

"People call me complaining about hiss, like hiss is the worst possible thing they can imagine. Hiss, to me, means that real people played this music."

What has the noise made by musicians during the playing to do with HISS on the tapes? The musicians' hitting their violins with their bows or the rattling of the keys on a clarinet, or the humming of the conductor are audible on DDD recordings as well - and often much more so. The hiss comes from the imperfections of the analogue chain during recording.

That said, in the past record companies have all too often killed the top end of the old recording by noise reduction. Better hiss than no top end.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2015 - 3:50 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

That part makes no sense:

"People call me complaining about hiss, like hiss is the worst possible thing they can imagine. Hiss, to me, means that real people played this music."

What has the noise made by musicians during the playing to do with HISS on the tapes? The musicians' hitting their violins with their bows or the rattling of the keys on a clarinet, or the humming of the conductor is audible on DDD recordings as well - and often much more so. The hiss comes from the imperfections of the analogue chain during recording.

That said, in the past record companies have all too often killed the top end of the old recording by noise reduction. Better hiss than no top end.


He was surely referring to the ambient sound of the recording location.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2015 - 4:10 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

There are different stages of tape hiss. Original masters or preservation tapes from optical tracks have inherent hiss from the analog process. This is usually fairly negligible. When tapes are dubbed over two and three times, however, they can pick up what I refer to as "top soil". This was especially true with the Ken Darby tapes of THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD held at BYU. When I did the original production for Ryko of the original soundtrack discs (discs one and two) I was very careful to remove this "top soil". Unfortunately, the folks at MGM felt that in doing this I had altered the original audio, and they released the score with basically no audio correction. At that point, I had my name removed from the project because I did not feel this was the best representation of the score, particularly one which had many serene moments that this "top soil" spoiled in my opinion.

So like in everything else dealing with these vintage and archival recordings, there are no set rules.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2015 - 7:33 AM   
 By:   The Thing   (Member)

I found the talk of the state of the soundtrack collecting market quite sobering, considering that article is 20 years old. With a possible audience size of just 5,000 collectors, and the glut of releases coming out back then and quickly disappearing unnoticed, it's a wonder things are still going.

Obviously these days, most of the labels engage in discussions with their customers on this board and can therefore have a good idea of their potential market. But for the one or two who don't, it can seem like they are just flooding the market with new releases from current movies, and sometimes they come and go with little or no discussion on here, and potentially result in far lower sales figures than they could achieve.

Additionally, are new younger collectors appearing in sufficient numbers, or does the collector base consist mainly of the same fans growing older, who potentially have music tastes leaning towards the older scores rather than the newer ones? Obviously, not having brick 'n' mortar stores displaying CDs isn't going to help matters... does the equivalent of having online stores with digital content compensate for that? Or is it far harder to catch the eye of casual listeners when everything can disappear off-screen with the click of a mouse button?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2015 - 8:28 AM   
 By:   Jon Lewis   (Member)

overreaction to analog tape hiss is a terrible thing in my experience. If there's one thing I can't stand it's vintage recordings whose top end has been defanged in the name of removing all hiss.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2015 - 9:19 AM   
 By:   Stefan Huber   (Member)

overreaction to analog tape hiss is a terrible thing in my experience. If there's one thing I can't stand it's vintage recordings whose top end has been defanged in the name of removing all hiss.

Yes, it's AWFUL! Less is more... I'll take a hissy recording any time over a (over-)noise-reduced one. What's more: with today's possibilites one can apply NR-filters during playback. If it is done on the source, however, it's irreversible and will sound awful for all eternity. The same goes for odd EQ choices, fake stereo effects etc.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2015 - 9:40 AM   
 By:   ANZALDIMAN   (Member)

Very good interview. I was a subscriber to SOUNDTRACK for years but don't recall reading this. A point of interest in the interview for me was the mentioning of that Telarc "It's A Wonderful Life" David Newman / Royal Philharmonic disc. Was there ever a darker, stranger cover on a soundtrack cd that included the type of classic Christmas content than that one did? That cover design is simply awful. At first glance it looks like a horror movie compilation! And he had a point about the disc being poorly promoted to a mass audience. I managed to find one copy buried deep in the classical section of a popular cd chain store at the time. And this was the late 80's when the Telarc score compilation albums were usually good sellers.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2015 - 12:49 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

I liked this quasi-comedic anecdote:

Could anyone ever sue the soundtrack labels that put out limited-edition releases for the collector, but don’t pay the re-use fee?

There is a chance that one of these companies could get sued. However, I think the following would have to happen: You would have to take the soundtrack disc to the head of business affairs at the studio who owns the film. You’d have to put it on his desk in front of him and say, “This is an illegal release of one of your pictures.” He would say, “I’ve never heard of this movie.” You would then say something like, “It’s one of your studio’s most famous films.” He would then reply, “And what is this?” And you’d respond, “It’s the music from the film.” He would then say, “Well, who’s done it?” You would say, “It was done by such-and-such a company,” and he would then say, “What’s their telephone number?” You would then give him the telephone number. And if he got a busy signal, that would be the end of it. The bottom line is, nobody cares about film music. It’s sad but true.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2024 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.
Website maintained and powered by Veraprise and Matrimont.