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 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 1:09 AM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

It dawned on me one day when my seven year-old daughter asked me to "put the window up" in the car that we no longer roll them up or down, although I still habitually use that word to describe the act of making the window move. The word "rolling" has no meaning to her in that context; now you just push a button and make it happen.

I also still tend to think of dialing a number on my smartphone and rewinding a track of music that I want to hear again even though there are no dials or winding involved.


What other examples can you think of?

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 3:04 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I make up CDrs of popular songs for my mother and she will always refer to playing a tape. smile

Of course, she grew up in the days of the 78rpm and its 45/LP successor which we should refer to as discs but that word was probably as alien to her then as it is now.

And, when I started working, my early studies included Information Technology, a part of which was distinguishing tape and disc based systems.

Mitch

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 3:50 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

To this day, some software engineers, when referring to a line of code in a computer program, still call it a card. The term dates back to when each line of a program was literally printed (and mechanically hole-punched) on its own physical card.

Your program back then was called a stack, because it consisted of a physical stack of cards that was fed into a card reader machine. You still hear that term today too, as in "Try resetting your TCP/IP stack."

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 4:09 AM   
 By:   Recordman   (Member)

We still refer to a group of compiled music recordings, be they analog or digital, CD or streamed and certainly LP records
as "albums" or even "record albums." That term goes back to the time of 78 RPM shellac recordings when record sets were actually released in fold open "albums" similar to scrapbooks.

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 7:43 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

People still talk about 'taping' when they record something.


It's actually quite sobering to think that Ayla is SEVEN. Time's fugitin' on.

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 8:32 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

"Be Kind, Rewind" stickers.

"Bunny ears".

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 9:28 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

It dawned on me one day when my seven year-old daughter asked me to "put the window up" in the car that we no longer roll them up or down, although I still habitually use that word to describe the act of making the window move. The word "rolling" has no meaning to her in that context; now you just push a button and make it happen.


I still "roll up and down" my car windows.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 12:08 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Mixtape

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 12:35 PM   
 By:   Adam B.   (Member)

"Hit the Jackpot" at casino slot machines.

Everything is electronic now. The days of hundreds of coins falling into the tray are gone. In Atlantic City, at least.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 1:06 PM   
 By:   James MacMillan   (Member)

Black-and-white television.

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 1:58 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

"Wind my watch"

"Set the clock" (since many clocks now set themselves...)

"Hang up the phone" (as many phones are no cellphones, with nothing to hang up, just a button to end a call)



And humorously...

"Turn the TV off" (good luck finding buttons on these new fucking TV's; I have to unplug ones to turn them off)

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 2:19 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

"Hit the Jackpot" at casino slot machines.




One-armed bandit. Just a button now.

And we "wind up" the car window as opposed to rolling it up, but same principle.

Great topic, by the way.

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 2:36 PM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

"Wind my watch" ...

I spent a long time looking to replace my watch when it finally died a few years ago ... at about 34 years of age ... and continue to wind my new one. It is a self-winder but I do so little most days that I don't move enough to keep it wound-up!

I won't buy a watch powered by a battery.

Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 3:20 PM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

When I record a TV program on my planner (in my case a Tivo) I still find myself saying I've taped it, people still seem to know what I'm talking about.

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2015 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

"Punch the clock" (since many emplyers are dropping card-punch clocks and doing computer sign-in systems, or dropped them for the newer [now older] credit card ID's that you swipe)

Tell that to newer generations, and they'll ask why you want to punch the clock -- what has it ever done to you?

"Stop the tape"

"Stop the presses!" (well, that's where many newspapers are headed -- outdated by technology that allows them to go online and still "appeal" to their reduced consumer base)

"Burn a copy"
In the one future if you say that to newer generations, they'll get the fire department. ;-)

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2015 - 12:23 AM   
 By:   RonBurbella   (Member)

Ahhh, you people are getting to "sound like a broken record."

Ron Burbella

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2015 - 2:44 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

To this day, some software engineers, when referring to a line of code in a computer program, still call it a card. The term dates back to when each line of a program was literally printed (and mechanically hole-punched) on its own physical card.

Your program back then was called a stack, because it consisted of a physical stack of cards that was fed into a card reader machine. You still hear that term today too, as in "Try resetting your TCP/IP stack."


The Tron 2.0 game uses that term too. Quote "not with those finders searching the stacks".

D.S.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2015 - 2:46 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

Isn't "texting"starting to get outdated already like "Myspace".

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2015 - 3:14 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Isn't "texting"starting to get outdated already like "Myspace".

D.S.


If only I knew what you meant by Myspace ... I might agree! smile

Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2015 - 5:45 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

How many composers still "write" music?

 
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