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 Posted:   Dec 14, 2018 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   mikael488   (Member)



Not seen these pictures before. Wow! Great share. What is the history behind these? Fascinating.


The pictures come from the august 1977 issue of ARPeggio which contains an article on Jerry Goldsmith. The ARPeggio newsletter was published circa 1973-1980 by the ARP company for ARP synthesizer owners and fans.

Here's the accompanying text:


Academy Award

winner Jerry Goldsmith scores top film soundtracks with ARP


HOLLYWOOD, CA (ARP}-lf you've gone to a movie in the past ten years, chances are you've heard the music of Jerry Goldsmith. And you may have heard one of his ARP synthesizers,
too.

Goldsmith, who recently won an Oscar for THE OMEN as best original motion picture score, utilizes a large ARP 2500 and an ARP 2600 synthesizer when composing for a film. His home studio is equipped with a video cassette player which he uses to run scenes repeatedly while he tries out various background melodies on acoustic and electric piano and his ARPs.

During his career he has composed music for some 70 films and has been nominated 8 times for an Academy Award. Some of his many scores include those for CHINATOWN. THE WIND AND THE LION. PLANET OF THE APES. PATTON. SEVEN DAYS IN MAY. A PATCH OF BLUE. LONELY ARE THE BRAVE. THE SAND PEBBLES. PAPILLON, LOGAN'S RUN. ISLANDS IN THE STREAM, and THE CASSANDRA CROSSING.

Jerry started out in the CBS music department, writing scores for radio programs like SUSPENSE. In 1955 when CBS needed a musical score for an hour-long TV series called
CLIMAX. Goldsmith was put under contract as a composer. From there he progressed to writing music for STUDIO ONE and PLAYHOUSE 90. both "live" dramatic programs, and
eventually wound up writing for films. More than 100 feature films are made each year, and
he is in great demand by the top studios for his ability to produce outstanding music in a high
pressure field.

More and more of his music utilizes the sound of the synthesizer, and Jerry admits that the ARP synthesizer has become a regular fixture in his work. If this is so. then the best of
Jerry Goldsmith is yet to be heard.

 
 Posted:   Dec 15, 2018 - 12:34 AM   
 By:   Gold Digger   (Member)



Not seen these pictures before. Wow! Great share. What is the history behind these? Fascinating.


The pictures come from the august 1977 issue of ARPeggio which contains an article on Jerry Goldsmith. The ARPeggio newsletter was published circa 1973-1980 by the ARP company for ARP synthesizer owners and fans.

Here's the accompanying text:


Academy Award

winner Jerry Goldsmith scores top film soundtracks with ARP


HOLLYWOOD, CA (ARP}-lf you've gone to a movie in the past ten years, chances are you've heard the music of Jerry Goldsmith. And you may have heard one of his ARP synthesizers,
too.

Goldsmith, who recently won an Oscar for THE OMEN as best original motion picture score, utilizes a large ARP 2500 and an ARP 2600 synthesizer when composing for a film. His home studio is equipped with a video cassette player which he uses to run scenes repeatedly while he tries out various background melodies on acoustic and electric piano and his ARPs.

During his career he has composed music for some 70 films and has been nominated 8 times for an Academy Award. Some of his many scores include those for CHINATOWN. THE WIND AND THE LION. PLANET OF THE APES. PATTON. SEVEN DAYS IN MAY. A PATCH OF BLUE. LONELY ARE THE BRAVE. THE SAND PEBBLES. PAPILLON, LOGAN'S RUN. ISLANDS IN THE STREAM, and THE CASSANDRA CROSSING.

Jerry started out in the CBS music department, writing scores for radio programs like SUSPENSE. In 1955 when CBS needed a musical score for an hour-long TV series called
CLIMAX. Goldsmith was put under contract as a composer. From there he progressed to writing music for STUDIO ONE and PLAYHOUSE 90. both "live" dramatic programs, and
eventually wound up writing for films. More than 100 feature films are made each year, and
he is in great demand by the top studios for his ability to produce outstanding music in a high
pressure field.

More and more of his music utilizes the sound of the synthesizer, and Jerry admits that the ARP synthesizer has become a regular fixture in his work. If this is so. then the best of
Jerry Goldsmith is yet to be heard.


Many thanks for posting.

Really enjoying this Intrada disc. The anomalies with some of the cues is minor to my ears and I listen on headphones. The stereo cues are very welcome as they make me appreciate the synth work now. I previously found them a jarring listening experience. To properly hear the lovely main theme and the evolution of it over the running time of the score feels like discovering this music for the first time. Such an important and great release from Intrada. So great Armin Steiner saved the score.

 
 Posted:   Dec 16, 2018 - 9:41 PM   
 By:   Steve H   (Member)

Wow, my ears do not deceive me.....'TV Source' is right out of The General With The Cockeyed ID!

 
 Posted:   Dec 16, 2018 - 9:49 PM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

That's what I was thinking...

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 16, 2018 - 11:11 PM   
 By:   Jim Cleveland   (Member)

Was it rerecorded for the movie, or was it taken directly from the ID master tapes????

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2018 - 12:59 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Herbert Spencer orchestrated instead of Arthur Morton. Interesting.

Is that significant, David? I’m not familiar with Mr Spencer’s work.

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2018 - 2:26 AM   
 By:   Dadid L   (Member)

Herbert Spencer orchestrated instead of Arthur Morton. Interesting.

Is that significant, David? I’m not familiar with Mr Spencer’s work.


You are probably familiar with, thanks to his orchestrations for John williams, especially during the 1980s ! smile

But what was his influence on this Goldsmith score, I do not know...

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2018 - 9:46 AM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

Spencer also did The Stripper and Bandolero--and I think his presence on those projects just reinforces the idea that where Goldsmith was concerned the orchestrator did not have a tremendous influence on the music. You can compare Bandolero to any of Goldsmith's other westerns of the period or even Planet of the Apes, all of which were done by Arthur Morton, and I doubt you could point to any real difference in sound. Goldsmith obviously laid out the voicing and playing in his works in extraordinary detail and had a signature approach even as the style itself could be quite different from project to project. I think orchestrators could refine on a micro level but Arthur Morton himself often dismissed what he did as "I take the music from the yellow paper and put it on the white paper" and Goldsmith described an orchestrator as "a sounding board." I think they were necessary just in terms of time, to get the micro details like what the first violins vs what the second violins would be playing etc.
As for the source music in Peter Proud, I didn't have cue sheets to work off of and given what the sources were I doubt that music was identified, but I would assume it was probably rerecorded for the project rather than paying reuse for the original recording, assuming it was from General with the Cockeyed ID. There are a few other examples of that where Goldsmith would reuse things, like using "The Prize" as muzak in Coma for example...

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2018 - 9:58 AM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Wow, my ears do not deceive me.....'TV Source' is right out of The General With The Cockeyed ID!

Thanks! I couldn't place it!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2018 - 10:38 AM   
 By:   Roger Feigelson   (Member)



Many thanks for posting.

Really enjoying this Intrada disc. The anomalies with some of the cues is minor to my ears and I listen on headphones. The stereo cues are very welcome as they make me appreciate the synth work now. I previously found them a jarring listening experience. To properly hear the lovely main theme and the evolution of it over the running time of the score feels like discovering this music for the first time. Such an important and great release from Intrada. So great Armin Steiner saved the score.


Armin Steiner did what now?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2018 - 11:09 AM   
 By:   Jim Cleveland   (Member)

Roger, you silly....
Armin Steiner invented baking soda!big grinbig grinbig grin

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2018 - 2:46 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

I mentioned Cock Eyed ID in the other Peter Proud thread yonks ago.
Obviously nobody reads stuff anymore!!

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2018 - 8:54 PM   
 By:   Steve H   (Member)

.

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2018 - 8:55 PM   
 By:   Steve H   (Member)

I mentioned Cock Eyed ID in the other Peter Proud thread yonks ago.
Obviously nobody reads stuff anymore!!


Err, you may have dream't this,......from a previous life wink

 
 Posted:   Dec 18, 2018 - 12:02 AM   
 By:   Gold Digger   (Member)



Many thanks for posting.

Really enjoying this Intrada disc. The anomalies with some of the cues is minor to my ears and I listen on headphones. The stereo cues are very welcome as they make me appreciate the synth work now. I previously found them a jarring listening experience. To properly hear the lovely main theme and the evolution of it over the running time of the score feels like discovering this music for the first time. Such an important and great release from Intrada. So great Armin Steiner saved the score.


Armin Steiner did what now?


Oops! smile He recorded the score but didn’t save it.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 2:40 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

A very exciting and different score from the norm.

I like it but may need to see the film before deciding to buy it.
Brm

 
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