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 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 4:17 AM   
 By:   Josh "Swashbuckler" Gizelt   (Member)

No musical form springs fully formed from the forehead of Zeus. There is not a single composer who has ever written anything who was not influenced by something previous to them. Which, again, leads us to the problem in this thread of what defines an “important” film score — is it the one that broke the new ground, or the one that popularized that new ground? Where does one end and the other begin?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 4:20 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Yes, that's the problem with such threads, when you have too few specific parameters to work from.

 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 4:47 AM   
 By:   Amer Zahid   (Member)

Zimmer 's INTERSTELLAR was for me the most important score I had heard in a long time that actually caught me of guard. I was glad that it was nominated for an Oscar but sadly lost.

 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 11:13 AM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)

No musical form springs fully formed from the forehead of Zeus. There is not a single composer who has ever written anything who was not influenced by something previous to them. Which, again, leads us to the problem in this thread of what defines an “important” film score — is it the one that broke the new ground, or the one that popularized that new ground? Where does one end and the other begin?

Interestingly, this could also be said about the more radical, extreme composers like Schoenberg and Berg, both of whom were into Bartok, Debussy, and Stravinsky (their antecedents).

Not sure I want to be board with such an absolute, but there are certain grounds for this assertion. For instance, I'm fairly sure Wagner's three hour delayal of resolution in Tristan und Isolde was the complete first of its kind though. Nothing had been done that big, at least not from a consonance perspective.

 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 11:15 AM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)

Yes, that's the problem with such threads, when you have too few specific parameters to work from.

It sure can be seen as limiting: "important".

Then there's the far outfield whom might say "film scores aren't feeding the world. how important can they be?"

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   kaseykockroach   (Member)

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World.

At least until Call of the Wild comes out.

 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 1:59 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Your whole premise seems to.be that Zimmer is a Newman-like figure who forces composers to write like him.
Balderdash!
Brm


I have never said nor implied that Hans Zimmer forced composers to write like him.

I said it was the producers who want the Zimmer sound.

Hans Zimmer seems to be a humble and very nice guy, and I really like listening to his music. Interstellar was a really interesting score, mixing medieval and contemporary influences (the medieval influences may come from contemporary composers like Arvo Pärt in this case, though).

There's only one Hans Zimmer, and the composers who tr

tty to imitate him are not really interesting.



Glad to hear you say that!
The last thing i want to read is another Zimmer basher.
Btw I discussed the Part-Zimmer connection in the INTERSTELLAR thread!

 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 2:56 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

West Side Story, perhaps, on the somewhat shaky grounds that it is coming around again sometime not long from now (so it seems) having instigated the current focus on the subject due to it being the last important film score raising the impetus to do so. We have incidental score fused to perfection with song and lyric. And there was that La La Land (not to be confused with you know who) which made an attempt to recapture the rhythm of the dance with song thrown in for good measure, as of late.

It could be that WSS is the driver for that which never ever goes under completely due to sheer unremitting popularity, and whose resurrection could see a new hive of activity in the musical genre.

 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 3:14 PM   
 By:   townerbarry   (Member)

1972 John Williams Images.

What a Quirky, Strange, Haunting, Complicated..Non Hollywood Score.

Images was Nominated along with Williams The Poseidon Adventure Score.

But Images was the best score of 1972.

John Williams discussed the process of scoring Images, Williams said that Altman said that Williams could what ever he wanted, but beyond the budget, Williams was on his own.

I have always been impressed by the style of music. Very non conventional. To your typical Williams score at all. If you were introduced to 80’s and 90’s John Williams Music, Images will be a big jarring effect to your ears. Images sounds nothing like Later on Williams at all.

And with Bizarre effects of Stomu Yamashta and Wild instruments and percussion, and Yamashta very strange Vocals..You will be involved on higher level of John Williams’s Images.

When someone ask John Williams his best scores, Schindler’s List, CEOTTK, and Images.

I would 100% Agree.

 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2019 - 8:04 PM   
 By:   Adventures of Jarre Jarre   (Member)

  • Total Recall.

    I knew I liked you for some reason. big grin

  •  
     Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 6:23 AM   
     By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)

  • Total Recall.

    I knew I liked you for some reason. big grin


    When I listen to that and then Zimmer's superhero scores I can't help but smile. That said, I love Man of Steel and REALLY like Dark Knight Rises.

    I also listened to Interstellar again recently and have to agree, this might be his best score, really like it. Inception is a bit burned out for me, but there's some killer music on there too imo.

    So, Zimmer definitely had a big contribution, albeit mostly for his superhero music (what was bigger for him than the Batman stuff? I'm honestly asking, as I could be wrong here). And the most universally recognized of his scores I'm again presuming to be Dark Knight (which, as we know, he co-authored with not only JNH).

    Whether DK was more significant than TR is for you to decide. To me TR was just as much a landmark in action scores as Capricorn One, Star Trek (though not as tuneful perhaps). One could argue that for DK, too.

  •  
     Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 2:57 PM   
     By:   solium   (Member)

    Henry Mancini- Probably popularized soundtrack purchasing in the 60's.
    John Williams- Made a lot of kids soundtrack fans in the 70's.
    James Horner- Captivated (non classically literate) audiences in the 80's.
    Hans Zimmer- Gave way to a new generation of soundtrack fans who got into non-traditional scoring in the 90's to the present.

    I don't think we've had any game changers since the 90's.

     
     Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 4:46 PM   
     By:   LordDalek   (Member)

    Lord of the Rings.

     
     
     Posted:   Feb 14, 2019 - 3:32 AM   
     By:   Thor   (Member)

    I don't think we've had any game changers since the 90's.

    How would you know? You haven't paid attention to film music since George Bush sr. was president.

     
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