Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 4:56 AM   
 By:   SBD   (Member)

A fine actor with a number of impressively-scored movies (Murder on the Orient Express, Tom Jones, Skyfall, Miller's Crossing).

Personally, I'd choose Julian Nott's doleful A Man of No Importance. Wonderful music.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 5:55 AM   
 By:   judy the hutt   (Member)

I sure like Skyfall by Thomas Newman.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   lacoq   (Member)

Two gems: Picasso Summer - Michel Legrand & Two For The Road - Henry Mancini......


 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 7:31 AM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Looker!


Wolfen!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 7:35 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Has to be Two For The Road for me.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 7:54 AM   
 By:   William R.   (Member)

Indeed there's been a lot of great ones. Have to go with Under the Volcano for myself. RIP.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 7:58 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Thomas Newman - SKYFALL
John Powell - THE BOURNE ULTIMATUM

I'm also curious about James Newton Howard's THE IMAGE (1990).

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 8:00 AM   
 By:   Luc Van der Eeken   (Member)

The Browning Version. Isham. One of his best.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 8:05 AM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

There are many: Alan price's songs for O Lucky Man are wonderful. Also, Richard Rodney Bennett's Murder on the orient Express, John Addison's Tom Jones, and Alex North's Under the Volcano.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 8:27 AM   
 By:   connorb93   (Member)

By coincidence, I ended up listening to Wolfen that day. Never paid it much attention before, not a bad score.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 8:31 AM   
 By:   skyross   (Member)

Two For The Road by the Great Henry Mancini.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 8:37 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Having scanned his IMDb listing, I'd go for Two for the Road (1967) - Henry Mancini, too ... with George Delerue's lovely Rich in Love (1992) as a follow-up. I also like a few others but there's little point in making a list.

Certainly Mancini's melody is one of that Maestro's best.

Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 9:34 AM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)


Two For the Road ..... Henry Mancini.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 9:35 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

Another vote for TWO FOR THE ROAD. Was just listening to the Kritzy release the other day. Perhaps a little heavy on the umpteen variations of the Main Theme... but what an amazing theme.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 9:36 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

TOM JONES
WOLFEN
PICASSO SUMMER

are in my collection

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 9:38 AM   
 By:   governor   (Member)

Two for the Road (Henry Mancini)
Rich in Love (Georges Delerue)

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 9:54 AM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

Oh yeah, Picasso Summer is pretty damn good.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   Captain Cold   (Member)

A fine actor with a number of impressively-scored movies (Murder on the Orient Express, Tom Jones, Skyfall, Miller's Crossing).

Personally, I'd choose Julian Nott's doleful A Man of No Importance. Wonderful music.



LOOKER

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 10:12 AM   
 By:   Bill in Portland Maine   (Member)

There wasn't much to James Horner's score for "The Dresser," but I was very impressed with it. This was one of his six amazing scores from 1983, and the polar opposite in tone from his brilliant and VERY BIG score for Peter Yates' other film that year, "Krull."

In fact, when that Finney movie came out (I loved every second of his scenery-chewing performance, and his chemistry with Tom Courtney) I only knew Horner from his big, brash scores for Star Trek II, 48 Hours, and Krull. But this film showed me another side of him: quiet, restrained, and delicate. There are two moments that impressed me: an early scene where he starts a cue by matching the tone of a steam locomotive's whistle as it pulls out of the station (following Finney's iconic "STOP! THAT! TRAAAAAIN!!!" moment), and his adaptation in the end credits of a ditty that Courtney sings during the movie.

Like I say, it's a wisp of a score, and not my favorite for a Finney film (that would be either Miller's Crossing or Big Fish). But in its restraint it solidified for me Horner's budding greatness as a real pro at spotting films and understanding that less is often more.

Gonna miss Finney, as I do Horner. A lot.

-

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2019 - 12:54 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

It would have to Michel Legrand's "The Picasso Summer" and for a musical, Leslie Bricusse's "Scrooge".

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2019 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.