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 Posted:   Aug 14, 2019 - 8:58 AM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

This is definitely my favorite Tarantino film in a long time. Enjoyed it more than Django, Hateful 8 and the Kill Bills.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 14, 2019 - 10:07 AM   
 By:   Mark5760   (Member)

Who is the composer for much of the closing credits when period music from the 60's is not being used?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 14, 2019 - 10:21 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Who is the composer for much of the closing credits when period music from the 60's is not being used?

I believe you are talking about, as mentioned above, Maurice Jarre's THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JUDGE ROY BEAN.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 14, 2019 - 10:58 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

As soon as I heard that end title music from "...Judge Roy Bean", I had to chuckle to myself and think: "Perfect!". One of the catch lines of the Roy Bean movie or maybe it was in the dialog somewhere was "...Maybe this isn't the way it was... it's the way it should have been." That's ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD and I'd be surprised if Quentin didn't choose the Jarre piece partially for that reason. The theme has a lovely sense of nostalgia and melancholy anyway.


You have a good memory. See the tagline on the poster below.

 
 Posted:   Aug 14, 2019 - 7:42 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

If it's.not " historically accurate, I'm not going!

Right, Solium?
wink

 
 Posted:   Aug 15, 2019 - 6:38 PM   
 By:   John Mullin   (Member)

Does anyone know WHICH recording of TORN CURTAIN was used? "The Killing" sounded more like the McNeely recording to me, but the use of "The Radiogram" at Spahn Ranch sounded more like the original recording that finally appeared on the "Alfred Hitchcock Presents... Signatures In Suspense" album in 1999.

Anyone know? I've never had the Elmer Bernstein LP recording.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 15, 2019 - 7:00 PM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)

Does anyone know WHICH recording of TORN CURTAIN was used? "The Killing" sounded more like the McNeely recording to me, but the use of "The Radiogram" at Spahn Ranch sounded more like the original recording that finally appeared on the "Alfred Hitchcock Presents... Signatures In Suspense" album in 1999.

Anyone know? I've never had the Elmer Bernstein LP recording.


Almost certain I saw the Bernstein recording credited at the end...and if you buy QT's BS claim ALL his music drops come strictly from vinyl (I know my LP of The Entity has seen some play!!), this would bear the Bernstein out.

 
 Posted:   Aug 15, 2019 - 7:18 PM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Does anyone know WHICH recording of TORN CURTAIN was used? "The Killing" sounded more like the McNeely recording to me, but the use of "The Radiogram" at Spahn Ranch sounded more like the original recording that finally appeared on the "Alfred Hitchcock Presents... Signatures In Suspense" album in 1999.

Anyone know? I've never had the Elmer Bernstein LP recording.


Yeah, this sounds right, judging from the credits on the IMDB.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2019 - 11:53 AM   
 By:   mikael488   (Member)


There is a splendid Western-styled cue when the character of Tex rides his horse back to the Spahn Ranch. I'm hoping to track it down - it could be either the Cattle Annie excerpt or one of the De Masi cues.


Did you find out what cue was used in that particular scene?

I haven't seen the film yet but since you describe the music as 'western-styled', could it be the opening credits music from the Italian western Apocalypse Joe by Bruno Nicolai?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2019 - 1:04 AM   
 By:   Hercule Platini   (Member)

It just felt like a mess. It's so drenched in the pop culture mods to old movies and music and TV shows (which he couldn't really do in Django, Inglourious or Hateful) that even I got a bit fed up with the posters and cinema marquees and other references. I'm usually up for that Movie Quiz aspect, to look it up afterwards on the IMDb and see how many I got right (and how many I missed) but I just wearied of it in the end. Half an hour or more of QT nerding around could be trimmed (or lopped) out to no significant loss, which would tighten the baggy, all-over-the-place narrative enormously.

There is fun to be had with it, though the violence in the last reels felt excessive even to me, and I've marathoned the Saw movies over a weekend at least twice.

http://streetrw.blogspot.com/2019/08/once-upon-time-in-hollywood.html

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2019 - 12:23 PM   
 By:   John Black   (Member)

I loved the recreation of Hollywood circa 1969, but I'm of a certain age. The film is more about the stuntman/TV western milieu than it is about the whole Manson family culture. I'm not a Tarantino fan, but I liked most of this film up until the climax.

 
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