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 Posted:   Aug 10, 2019 - 3:09 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

I was very struck by both the images and the music in Spielberg's trailer for SCHINDLER'S LIST. The film itself moved me very much, but after having experienced the trailer music, I was not as affected as so many others were by John Williams' film score, even though I have dearly loved Williams music ever since he was Johnny Willams and I was discovering his gifts on the soundtracks of ABC-TV's "Alcoa Premier." It was thanks to someone on this Message Board that I learned the trailer music had been from a classical piece by concert & film composer W. Kilar, (happily available on CD).

Even without comparison or reference to any other music, including Williams' own, I think I will never be able to feel satisfied with Williams' mini concerto for violin and orchestra in SCHINDLER'S. There's no questioning this gifted composer's sincerity in trying to express the tragedy of the Holoacaust, but I fear this approach was doomed by its very nature. There is something ineffable, untouchable, unreachable, in the magnitude and profundity of that tragedy, whose depths can never be plumbed by any human artist. I doubt that even Bach could have met that challenge, so there is no dishonor, to me, in Williams, a mere mortal, having written music that was very sad, and very beautiful, but inevitably inadequate to the task.

The Kilar music which so intrigued me in the trailer was of course never written with the purpose of rising to that profound occasion, so on its own limited terms it was able to express something of the solemnity of the places and people involved in this story, and thus was very effective in the trailer.

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2019 - 4:12 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

LIST wasnt a film ' about the Holocaust'.
It was a bout a man who stood up against the machinery of Evil, and challenged all people who failed to follow his example.

See SHOAH for a film " about the Holocaust"

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2019 - 5:45 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

The difference between the two films is obvious, and I'm well aware of it. Sorry if I over-simplified some things in my desire to write a fairly short, pithy post. What I don't understand is why you're so mean-spirited that you felt compelled to make such an issue of it.

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2019 - 6:18 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

The difference between the two films is obvious, and I'm well aware of it. Sorry if I over-simplified some things in my desire to write a fairly short, pithy post. What I don't understand is why you're so mean-spirited that you felt compelled to make such an issue of it.

I didn't mean to be. Sorry Preston.
I get a little touchy when people - esp. My people- say you can't make a film about the subject.
Claude Lanzmann is one of them.
There have been many great tragedies in history.
No one horror should be exempt from dramatic treatment.

I feel Spielberg's film greatness lies in the fact that it shows that complicity is not the only option.

Peace.
Bruce

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2019 - 7:00 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Marshall, as they used to say in the original Mad comics in the 50's: "Mother, come home - all is forgiven!" Your words have smoothed all my ruffled feathers.

You should live and be well,

Preston

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2019 - 7:18 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Marshall, as they used to say in the original Mad comics in the 50's: "Mother, come home - all is forgiven!" Your words have smoothed all my ruffled feathers.

You should live and be well,

Preston


It's MISTER Marshall!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2019 - 10:39 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

You know, Mr. Marshal, that hit me as soon as I posted it, and I apologize. This is no excuse, but it happens that all my life people have called me "Mr. Preston," even when I've just been introduced correctly. There's just something about the name Preston, I guess, that always sounds like a last name to just about everybody. In a strange way, then, I'm so used to hearing "Mr. Preston," when it should be "Preston," that I must have felt that "Mr. Marshal" must really be Marshal. As I said, no excuse.

If I corrected it above, that would just confuse latecomers, so I'll say it the right way here:

Mr. Marshall, as they used to say in the original Mad comics in the 50's: "Mother, come home - all is forgiven!" Your words have smoothed all my ruffled feathers.

You should live and be well,

Preston

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2019 - 10:48 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

You know, Mr. Marshal, that hit me as soon as I posted it, and I apologize. This is no excuse, but it happens that all my life people have called me "Mr. Preston," even when I've just been introduced correctly. There's just something about the name Preston, I guess, that always sounds like a last name to just about everybody. In a strange way, then, I'm so used to hearing "Mr. Preston," when it should be "Preston," that I must have felt that "Mr. Marshal" must really be Marshal. As I said, no excuse.

If I corrected it above, that would just confuse latecomers, so I'll say it the right way here:

Mr. Marshall, as they used to say in the original Mad comics in the 50's: "Mother, come home - all is forgiven!" Your words have smoothed all my ruffled feathers.

You should live and be well,

Preston


Not " MarshaL; MarshaLL!

Damn you! Damn you all to tell!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2019 - 12:23 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Oops. I have even less of a no-excuse story for that one. I do think I'm doing pretty well for having had only half a cup of coffee this morning. I'll try to do better tomorrow, Mr. Marshall.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2019 - 5:09 AM   
 By:   dbrooks   (Member)

The first one that came to my mind was Aquarium (Le Carnaval des Animaux) by
Camille Saint-Saëns on Days of Heaven.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2019 - 5:14 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

This actually happened to me quite recently. In the opening of Asaf Kapadia's MARADONA, there's this great, funky Eurodisco track over a montage sequence that sounds kinda Moroder-ish, but it's not from Pinto's score. I still don't know what it is, or who the composer is, but I'd really like to know.

 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2019 - 9:42 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

This actually happened to me quite recently. In the opening of Asaf Kapadia's MARADONA, there's this great, funky Eurodisco track over a montage sequence that sounds kinda Moroder-ish, but it's not from Pinto's score. I still don't know what it is, or who the composer is, but I'd really like to know.

We all would!

 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2019 - 9:45 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Oops. I have even less of a no-excuse story for that one. I do think I'm doing pretty well for having had only half a cup of coffee this morning. I'll try to do better tomorrow, Mr. Marshall.

If you ever get the chance, check out the ANDY KAUFMAN SPECIAL.
He is my inspiration

Crew member: " I'm sorry, Andy".
Kaufman: " It's MISTER Kaufman! Mister Kaufman! You're just a stagehand"!

God, I.miss that guy.
frown

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2019 - 1:56 PM   
 By:   Holger_N   (Member)

I always loved the end title music (also used in the chase sequence) from Charlie Chan And The Curse Of The Dragon Queen. But it was not Patrick Williams' music, the piece is called "Zampa Overture" by Ferdinand Hérold. Since there was no soundtrack release, I'm happy to enjoy this piece of music from time to time.

Charlie Chan And The Curse Of The Dragon Queen:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmQekIsg33U

Zampa Overture:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGGXbgvM59U

 
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