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 Posted:   Aug 3, 2019 - 2:57 PM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

Less than a second in (before the actual music started) she said "Logan's Run". And no, she didn't cheat.

I asked her how she'd got it so quickly.

She said the pulsating sound effect at the start of the film had always reminded her of coming out of anaesthesia after having me by Caesarian section. I was duly impressed.


Excuse me, but that pulse ( a three note motif really) IS "actual music" and the main theme/motif of the score! Even the trumpet opening reiterates that very synth theme.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2019 - 4:07 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Excuse me, but that pulse ( a three note motif really) IS "actual music" and the main theme/motif of the score! Even the trumpet opening reiterates that very synth theme.

Six notes.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2019 - 7:12 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

BTW I never made this connection before but the opening music sort of sounds like the Jaws theme.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2019 - 7:19 AM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

Logan's Run is the kind of film that's great - as long as you're a kid when you first watch it. Like The Omega Man, Theatre of Blood and many others.

Then you lose that ability to just enjoy stuff. It's sad really.


I'll never forget seeing it in 70 mm and six track surround sound when it opened in Denver. Any quibbles about the script, etc. were erased by the sheer spectacle of that format.

 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2019 - 10:09 AM   
 By:   Adventures of Jarre Jarre   (Member)

As much as people whine about sequels not explaining past films, I whine about this film not explaining itself in the allotted runtime. All I was left with was the only oldie who could map out the past, yet he's clearly lost his marbles and his marble bag. Thanks movie, thanks.

But the first half of it is still enticing to this day. Ha, take that, The Childhood!

  • I would assume it was a way to control the population. With the ceremony and the promise of renewal, it was a fun way to get them on board. Why believing exploding in mid air would be a great way to renew is not explained.

    Especially since the effect is strikingly similar to getting ganked by Sandmen blasters.

  • The ending set up the sequel we never got. But yeah, now they're free to live and grow old. And die of sepsis and whatnot.

    If they didn't die of starvation first, due to the lack of farming and irrigation skills. I'd imagine a sequel having Sandmen and Runners split into factions, with Old Man Cat Guy still explaining jack all.

  •  
     Posted:   Aug 11, 2019 - 3:51 PM   
     By:   solium   (Member)

    Here's all the Logan's Run deleted scenes (with reconstruction)

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLkjrUu7zufJeZTJRcJgtdrm9jdK9lzeE7

     
     Posted:   Aug 11, 2019 - 3:53 PM   
     By:   solium   (Member)

    David Hasselhoff was in Logan's Run?!


     
     
     Posted:   Aug 11, 2019 - 10:52 PM   
     By:   Nightingale   (Member)

    Logan's Run is the kind of film that's great - as long as you're a kid when you first watch it. Like The Omega Man, Theatre of Blood and many others.

    Then you lose that ability to just enjoy stuff. It's sad really.


    I very much agree. I don't think I would like the movie if it were made today, but the nostalgia factor and how much I liked it as a kid carries over to watching it today. Watched it with my brother and friend about 2 years ago (with some adult spirits added in) and we enjoyed it immensely.

     
     Posted:   Aug 12, 2019 - 1:43 AM   
     By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

    I admit I always liked LOGAN'S RUN, and probably would like it even if I watched it today for the first time. Sure, the movies is clearly dated from the 1970s, and some of its effects and miniatures look quaint by today's standards, but I nevertheless have a soft spot for it.

    Why and how the "City under the Dome" came to be is something that is left on purpose to some mystery, and I think the movie is all the better for it. I find it far more interesting and engaging if a movie stirs up some thought and does not spell everything out.

    Obviously, over time (and probably after wars and whatnot), human society has managed a "Utopian" society. Everything is perfect, everybody is beautiful, healthy, young, work has been reduced to a minimum, life is pleasure, sex, joy... and everbody even has the exact life span. It's a society some people dream about: everybody is equal, no one is healthier or lives longer or is better looking than anybody else. (In reality, such a life would make people go nuts with boredom and they probably would have randomly people wreak havoc just for the heck of it). But there is a high price to be payed for such a paradise: life ends at thirty, no exceptions. In fact, if one is so inclined, it's easy to pin archetypal Biblical analogies to the movie, with the "City" representing the garden Eden, and with the knowledge of "sanctuary/escape"/opening of the eyes comes death (before death, there was "Carousel", which was just another hedonistic party event), and old age, probably childbirth, and all kinds of trouble... but once the cat is out of the bag, there is not turning back. :-)

     
     
     Posted:   Aug 12, 2019 - 2:25 AM   
     By:   Octoberman   (Member)

    It was exactly the type of society that would be just unnatural enough to cause James T. Kirk to come barging in to free the citizens from the clutches of dystopian, tech-dominated lethargy.
    He was a zen master at killing computers.

     
     Posted:   Aug 12, 2019 - 2:35 AM   
     By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

    It was exactly the type of society that would be just unnatural enough to cause James T. Kirk to come barging in to free the citizens from the clutches of dystopian, tech-dominated lethargy.
    He was a zen master at killing computers.


    Yes. In fact, no matter how and where a society in Star Trek functioned, usually Kirk came along and stopped it dead in its tracks, prime directive be damned. :-D

     
     Posted:   Aug 12, 2019 - 6:42 AM   
     By:   solium   (Member)

    It was exactly the type of society that would be just unnatural enough to cause James T. Kirk to come barging in to free the citizens from the clutches of dystopian, tech-dominated lethargy.
    He was a zen master at killing computers.


    Yes. In fact, no matter how and where a society in Star Trek functioned, usually Kirk came along and stopped it dead in its tracks, prime directive be damned. :-D


    Both statements are very true. While I understand the reason behind the Prime Directive I can't say I've ever totally bought into the philosophy.

    Dammit Oct, you've turned this into a Star Trek thread! big grin

     
     Posted:   Aug 12, 2019 - 7:11 AM   
     By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

    It was exactly the type of society that would be just unnatural enough to cause James T. Kirk to come barging in to free the citizens from the clutches of dystopian, tech-dominated lethargy.
    He was a zen master at killing computers.


    Yes. In fact, no matter how and where a society in Star Trek functioned, usually Kirk came along and stopped it dead in its tracks, prime directive be damned. :-D


    Both statements are very true. While I understand the reason behind the Prime Directive I can't say I've ever totally bought into the philosophy.<<<


    Neither did I. I mean, you are in the Universe to interact with the Universe, and you are always interacting, whether you want it or not. Kirk never took any of it seriously anyway. :-D


    Dammit Oct, you've turned this into a Star Trek thread! big grin


    That goes so fast.

     
     
     Posted:   Aug 12, 2019 - 11:54 AM   
     By:   Octoberman   (Member)

    Guys, you are all exactly right. I'm guilty as charged. I totally apologize.
    I don't even know how it happens!
    I'll be just sitting here reading posts and suddenly... Fizzbin goes off in my head!
    It's some kind of associative-process illness.

     
     Posted:   Aug 13, 2019 - 7:46 PM   
     By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

    Watched this film for the first time in 30 years. And it got me thinking...



    (I haven't had time to read the whole thread, so I hope I'm not repeating.)

    You know, Solly, some of your questions might be answered reading the novel.

    (I did find it by way of interlilbrary loan, but can't remember enough to say much about it.)

     
     Posted:   Aug 13, 2019 - 8:01 PM   
     By:   solium   (Member)

    Watched this film for the first time in 30 years. And it got me thinking...



    (I haven't had time to read the whole thread, so I hope I'm not repeating.)

    You know, Solly, some of your questions might be answered reading the novel.

    (I did find it by way of interlilbrary loan, but can't remember enough to say much about it.)


    You know, I think back when the film came out I read the novelization of the movie. But Ive never read the book the film is based off of.

     
     Posted:   Aug 14, 2019 - 9:03 AM   
     By:   funkymonkeyjavajunky   (Member)

    Check out "Logan's Run: Last Day" (The Colonial Radio Theatre) original radio dramatization released in 2011. In an extensive series of flashbacks (interspersed with the present story), the listener learns how the whole system (domes, sandmen, lastday, etc.) comes into being. In a nutshell...nuclear war, triaging the sick, limited supplies...evolves into a computer-controlled, authoritarian system.

     
     Posted:   Aug 15, 2019 - 7:39 AM   
     By:   solium   (Member)

    Check out "Logan's Run: Last Day" (The Colonial Radio Theatre) original radio dramatization released in 2011. In an extensive series of flashbacks (interspersed with the present story), the listener learns how the whole system (domes, sandmen, lastday, etc.) comes into being. In a nutshell...nuclear war, triaging the sick, limited supplies...evolves into a computer-controlled, authoritarian system.

    Cool that sounds interesting. I guess dystopia futures are all the same!

     
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