Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 8:54 AM   
 By:   KlaatuBaradaNikto   (Member)

I have a question, and I would like to know if this has happened to any of you, and what would be the cause (or causes) in your opinion, please.
Well, I'm a collector and I must have around 10,000 CDs (I guess, I stopped counting). When I buy a CD, listen once or twice, make the mp3, and put the CDs in a huge wooden cabinet that I have. I will probably never hear from most of these CDs again because of the high number I have, and I'm already old!
The problem has occurred to me maybe 10 times: after 5-10 years, I will listen to a certain CD again, and it is defective (skipping, scratching, etc)! This occurred to me today when I went to listen to GARDEN OF EVIL, from the HERRMANN AT 20th CENTURY FOX (Box Varese 2011) collection.
I washed the CD, I passed flannel, etc etc etc etc., but the problem continues, that is, this CD is damaged! I must have listened to this damn box a maximum of three times. Awesome, and totally frustrating.
Once, this happened with NORTH BY NORTHWEST (Intrada version) after more than 3 years, but Intrada itself replaced me with the media.

Well, what's your opinion? Has this ever happened to you? After so long, a media has had problem?
The problem would be the air, the oxygen, the earth's rotation (I can only be ironic because my anger is so great in these cases)?

Thank you!

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 9:13 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

We've all heard of this happening to CDs, but it hasn't happened to me yet. Or maybe I just haven't checked the CDs. Once ripped, that's pretty much it for me. I listen to the files.

And it's become clear that you have to rip your CDs when they're new, not wait years to take the cellophane off. I still believe that if there was no manufacturing defect, a CD should last a lifetime. You just don't know which ones will turn out to have the defect, and decay on the shelf.

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 9:15 AM   
 By:   Traveling Matt   (Member)

Generally speaking your problem is likely due to oxidation (oxygen making its way to the foil layer, often via the label side of the disc, and creating reflectivity issues on playback). This is what has happened when the reflective side acquires a bronze-looking hue. Washing the disc wouldn't help this.

Of course I can't be sure of your issue but that is often the case. These things don't typically have authoring or other such problems, and they won't acquire them after initially being okay. Some of my CDs go back to the beginning of the format and they play fine today.

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 9:19 AM   
 By:   Traveling Matt   (Member)

And it's become clear that you have to rip your CDs when they're new, not wait years to take the cellophane off. I still believe that if there was no manufacturing defect, a CD should last a lifetime. You just don't know which ones will turn out to have the defect, and decay on the shelf.

Good advice, especially with the current CD manufacturing shortages and delays we see today. If every label's order is a rush order because there's just one plant left, or however many are left, it's logical to anticipate quality control issues may go up.

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 9:39 AM   
 By:   steffromuk   (Member)

Could it be your player and not your CDs that's defectuous?

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   Halloween_Jack   (Member)

Could it be your player and not your CDs that's defectuous?

Was just going to ask this too.

Also always backup to lossless, rather than MP3 so you have a perfect backup. You can’t put back what’s been taken out...

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 10:08 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

My copy of The Black Cauldron developed an obnoxious "electronic woodchipper" noise on every track the last time I tried playing it, and sadly it's now OOP and impossible to replace. frown

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   JC   (Member)

Yes, it also happened to me. The older discs are "rotting" very slowly due to oxidation which normally affects just a few tracks at the beginning of the phenomenon. The newer ones "die" within a short period of time and become completely illegible. The quality of discs produced within the last years seems to decrease dramatically. I never ecountered so many obvious manufacturing errors and sudden "deaths" as in the last years.

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 11:02 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

Whatever happened to the promises of a "lifetime of listening enjoyment" that CDs promised back in the 80s?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 12:16 PM   
 By:   Melvin Stephens   (Member)

Unfortunately, I am so far off the charts worst than anyone...I owned cd's I've not listened to since purchasing as far back as...7 years ago. trying like hell to catch up. But who has time? Thanks to a poster here, who discovered cracks on a disc ...I believe Kiss The Girls? I opened, and discovered my copy was also defected. Company sent replacement. I can only hope there are no other such cd defects...because I am out of money.

My interest is now peaked...taking a look at my cd purchases, I pulled up: Movie Music email 5/10/2010 informing me: The Hawaiians, Supernova and Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (remastered) has been shipped. That's 10 years ago. All 3 are still in plastic un-played. And yes...I do have things going back even further...

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 1:23 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

I've got several thousand CDs too and I've NEVER let one go more than a few days without opening and playing it. I usually make a lossless (FLAC) backup within a few days of that first play and the external drive where that is kept is backed up on two local external drives and another one that I back up every few months and keep at my daughter's house.
However, my main method of listening to music is to play the original CDs. I've only had one CD ever go defective without some apparent physical damage (The Carl Stalling Project). I've never really experienced this oxidation or bronzing issue.
I have several that skipped in one player but not in another and on occasion I've had one that skipped in a couple of players (but not all) and not the computer's disc drive. I've managed to burn a DVR that then worked in all players. These issues largely seem to be player dependent. I've got 3 stereo system CD players plus two car players and except for the Stalling CD every CD would play in at least one of them if I experienced any playability issues in any other player.
Sometimes blowing canned air into CD player's tray fixes the skipping issue.

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 2:09 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

Whatever happened to the promises of a "lifetime of listening enjoyment" that CDs promised back in the 80s?

It was 100 years with an asterisk....the fine print specifies "dog years."

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 2:20 PM   
 By:   captain X   (Member)

Unfortunately, I am so far off the charts worst than anyone...I owned cd's I've not listened to since purchasing as far back as...7 years ago. trying like hell to catch up. But who has time? Thanks to a poster here, who discovered cracks on a disc ...I believe Kiss The Girls? I opened, and discovered my copy was also defected. Company sent replacement. I can only hope there are no other such cd defects...because I am out of money.

My interest is now peaked...taking a look at my cd purchases, I pulled up: Movie Music email 5/10/2010 informing me: The Hawaiians, Supernova and Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (remastered) has been shipped. That's 10 years ago. All 3 are still in plastic un-played. And yes...I do have things going back even further...


You are not alone...

Yes, CD's were meant to last for a lifetime plus. What was it... something like a million plays. What happened?



 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   captain X   (Member)

dp

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 3:40 PM   
 By:   films1   (Member)

I have many CDS never had a problem with any of them the first CD i bought was the star wars trilogy by the Utah symphony on the varese label . It still sounds like the first time i played it .

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 4:55 PM   
 By:   Lattanzi   (Member)

Ah yeah, that's happened to me recently. My CD of Herrmann's scores for A Christmas Carol and A Child Is Born started doing that on a couple tracks, but only when I digitize it. (And I did wait a whole year to rip it) On the stereo CD player it works fine. The same thing with some CDs in a Decca Stokowski box set I got. As has been said before, the first thing to do is digitize first and ask questions later.

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2019 - 5:12 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

You don't have to buy thousands of cds to get factory defective discs. I've gotten enough to know you should play them immediately. Same with dvds. But I don't think I've had a problem with "rot" in either media.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2019 - 5:37 AM   
 By:   keky   (Member)

Thank God I have never met such a problem with my CDs. With DVDs, yes, many times, but not with CDs. I have had defective discs (skipping some seconds here or there) once or twice but I replaced them with good ones. But this rotting problem I have never met - and hope I never will .

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2019 - 2:50 PM   
 By:   AndrewH   (Member)

I had the oxidation/bronzing effect on one of my oldest CD's from 1989. Star Trek - The Astral Symphony.
It was difficult to play the first few tracks on several CD players I owned.
However when I bought a more up to date CD player (actually my DVD player), it now plays absolutely perfectly.

 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2019 - 4:06 PM   
 By:   AMRA75   (Member)

I got two FSM cds which are dead. One is a cd from the box Goodbye Mr Chips (Didn't see that the title should be so ... true) and one cd from the box of Johnny Mandel.
One Intrada, Rambo 3, first edition.
A few of John Scott cds.
And it is not only the oxydation effect.
The fact is .... cd is not perfect, it happens sometimes
A lossless backup is one answer (but don't forget to make a backup of the backup!).

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2019 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.