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 Posted:   Oct 7, 2019 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

That suite from The Lost Weekend on the first Polydor/DG album is maybe my favorite film music recording ever.

Tragic & scary then redemption all in the same suite. It would figure it was written for one of Billy Wilder's movies.

 
 Posted:   Oct 7, 2019 - 11:17 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

I recall at least one of these was issued on Dolby reel-to-reel tape.

Yes, it was the first release, under the DDG banner:



It had a monumental bass boost and was one of the best Dolbyized reel-to-reel releases ever produced by Stereotape, its manufacturer.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 7, 2019 - 1:31 PM   
 By:   roadshowfan   (Member)


So, yes, using pristine lps for these releases will definitely work.


Roger F. said the problem was rights issues.


Is anyone in a position to explain more fully what these rights issues could possibly be? And why they would be any more complex than, say, the whole Gerhardt Classic film Scores series, or Herrmann's Phase 4 recordings?

I did wonder if maybe UMG don't actually own the Rozsa recordings outright and they were perhaps mainly funded by a private individual (or company) who has disappeared into the ether and therefore true ownership can't be verified?

Whatever the reason, it's a scandal and an outrage (to paraphrase Oscar Hammerstein II) that these wonderful recordings have never been issued on CD!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 7, 2019 - 3:03 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

That suite from The Lost Weekend on the first Polydor/DG album is maybe my favorite film music recording ever.

Tragic & scary then redemption all in the same suite. It would figure it was written for one of Billy Wilder's movies.


That one elicited comments from both Gerhardt and Rozsa. The two suites share some music in common, namely, the final statement of the love theme. Gerhardt, attending the Polydor session, said on hearing Rozsa's take, "Oh, so that's how it's supposed to go!" To which Rozsa, ever the sensible gentleman, responded (roughly), "No, Chuck, you do it your way. That's fine with me." Too bad many of us fans cannot manage similar acceptance of diversity. I recall the RCA as lush and lingering (almost Korngoldian), whereas Rozsa was more linear and hard-driven.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 8, 2019 - 5:23 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)


So, yes, using pristine lps for these releases will definitely work.






Roger F. said the problem was rights issues.


So does this mean that they know where the tapes are, or do missing tapes add yet another layer of complication beyond the rights issue?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 8, 2019 - 5:24 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

That suite from The Lost Weekend on the first Polydor/DG album is maybe my favorite film music recording ever.

Tragic & scary then redemption all in the same suite. It would figure it was written for one of Billy Wilder's movies.


I would add that the Lost Weekend suite on the CD with Double Indemnity is among a favorite of mine.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 1:13 PM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

OnyaBirri: I would add that the Lost Weekend suite on the CD with Double Indemnity is among a favorite of mine.

Are you referring to the Koch International Classics release with James Sedares conducting the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 3:29 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

OnyaBirri: I would add that the Lost Weekend suite on the CD with Double Indemnity is among a favorite of mine.

Are you referring to the Koch International Classics release with James Sedares conducting the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra?


I think that's the one. White cover with Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck?

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 3:46 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)


So, yes, using pristine lps for these releases will definitely work.



Roger F. said the problem was rights issues.

So does this mean that they know where the tapes are, or do missing tapes add yet another layer of complication beyond the rights issue?




Hopefully Roger F. can tell us more.

 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2020 - 1:30 PM   
 By:   Stefan Huber   (Member)

Annual bump for this wink I don't understand why any company would block a release like this? It's not as if there is a giant market for it. It should be a win-win situation for all the parties involved.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2020 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

I am a big fan of a well-put-together album, and these three are exactly that. I would trade a stack of complete expansions with all of their 30-second cues, outtakes, corresponding mono and stereo takes,and alternates for quality cds of these three collections with their exquisite suites. I'm not the Rozsa expert that many on these threads are, but I credit these albums, along with Herrmann's London suites, Gerhardt's classic film scores, Elmer Bernstein's club recordings, Walton's Shakespearean album on Seraphim,and the Savina/Rota Fellini compilation, with expanding my film music tastes beyond the silver age composers of the 60s.

I do have a double CD, boot probably, that has all of the tracks from the three lps, but not in the same order. They don't have quite the same impact out of their proper sequence. That's a testament to the care that went into those three Polydor albums.

 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2020 - 6:53 PM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

This series would seem a natural for Dutton/Vocalion, though I don't think they've done any UMG-owned albums.

It would be tremendous to find these were quadraphonic projects as well. Just wishful thinking.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2020 - 7:22 PM   
 By:   Polydor Polymaths   (Member)

They are real quiet pressings, too.

Yes, they're quiet because they're heavily noise-gated, which robs them of their high end, meaning that they really don't sound all that good. It was a problem with several of Prometheus's Rozsa releases in the 1990s, and something often encountered with European-based companies: they're more concerned with eliminating tape-hiss and background noise than with an acceptably wide sonic range. Compare, if you will, the sound in Prometheus's "All the Brothers Were Valiant" and "Young Bess" with what's in the FSM Rozsa Treasury.

One can re-equalize them at home, which does make them sound somewhat better, but that's still a poor substitute for a recording that comes with a genuine high end.

Those unauthorized CD's were produced over twenty years ago by what's likely a fly-by-night outfit, so it's likely that, were a company like Intrada to secure the rights, the resources at their disposal would likely make LP sources sound substantially better than what's out there now.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2020 - 7:30 PM   
 By:   Polydor Polymaths   (Member)

That suite from The Lost Weekend on the first Polydor/DG album is maybe my favorite film music recording ever.

That one elicited comments from both Gerhardt and Rozsa. The two suites share some music in common, namely, the final statement of the love theme. Gerhardt, attending the Polydor session, said on hearing Rozsa's take, "Oh, so that's how it's supposed to go!" To which Rozsa, ever the sensible gentleman, responded (roughly), "No, Chuck, you do it your way. That's fine with me." Too bad many of us fans cannot manage similar acceptance of diversity. I recall the RCA as lush and lingering (almost Korngoldian), whereas Rozsa was more linear and hard-driven.


Remember that Gerhardt asked Rozsa's permission to add a chorus to "The Jungle Book" suite, which the film's original soundtrack never had. Because Gerhardt's Calssic Film Scores series was the introduction to this world for so many, his versions have become so ingrained in listeners' minds --certainly all those who've never seen the film, and possibly even some who have -- that they think the music was always for orchestra and chorus and even complain when another recording has "omitted" it.

Rozsa never scored a film for John Ford, but there actually is a danger that when film score legend becomes fact, some will insist on printing the legend.

 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2020 - 9:40 PM   
 By:   Stefan Huber   (Member)

This series would seem a natural for Dutton/Vocalion, though I don't think they've done any UMG-owned albums.

They've done tons of vintage Decca stuff (including the Rozsa and one Herrmann album(s)) - all properly licensed from UMG.

 
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