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 Posted:   Jan 10, 2020 - 12:22 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)



https://www.theringer.com/star-wars/2020/1/9/21058016/rise-of-skywalker-star-wars-score-john-williams-last-soundtrack

This is a much KINDER essay than the "racist one." It is a bit long but very interesting. This essay comes to praise Williams music in the 9 Star Wars. (72 leitmotifs. Wow.) The author doesn't praise every Star Wars film, but his analysis is interesting, and his respect for Williams comes shining through.

Also, I love the final sentence of this essay.

Read it if interested.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2020 - 2:09 PM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

I read it, joan. I must admit that I lost interest in the Star Wars films even by the time THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK came around, and I was only twenty or twenty-one then. But I've caught up with them all, and while they never ignited any flame of passion in me (and a lot of them plain annoyed me), I've always been impressed by Williams' monumental contribution to the saga. 42 years! That's like Max Steiner writing KING KONG sequels from the original in 1933 right up to (almost) the John Barry-scored remake! It's really quite remarkable.

The link also gave me the desire to click on the RISE OF SKYWALKER theme. I'd never really been bothered before, but positive vibes from the article made me benevolent (to the idea of the film itself), and when I heard the John Williams theme it cleared my head and reminded me how damn beautiful his music can be, even to hardened old cynics like me. It just takes a little bit of meditation and a desire to be swept away by it, to become also like children again. It's not easy to do for us old guys, but I almost felt like Buddha when listening to that clip. I think John Williams actually IS Buddha, or at least Yoda. He's an inspiring figure in a murky world.

It would be easy to say, "Yeah, in a murky world of shit Disney Star Wars films and merchandising", but the article you linked to did touch a kind of "innocent again" nerve in me - and I hope that Williams' music will never grow sour for me. If it ever does, it'll be through an association with the whole overblown Star Wars universe mixed with my own elderly (middle aged) grumpiness. No fault of John Willliams, whose immense skill, talent, humility - and cherubic demeanor - should forever keep me at arm's length from being a total Scrooge.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2020 - 3:09 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Graham, you are not Scrooge nor a grumpy middle-aged man. Your beautifully written response shows you for what you are to so many of us here. DELIGHTFUL!! Thanks for sharing.

 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2020 - 4:33 PM   
 By:   johnonymous86   (Member)

https://www.theringer.com/star-wars/2020/1/9/21058016/rise-of-skywalker-star-wars-score-john-williams-last-soundtrack

This is a much KINDER essay than the "racist one." It is a bit long but very interesting. This essay comes to praise Williams music in the 9 Star Wars. (72 leitmotifs. Wow.) The author doesn't praise every Star Wars film, but his analysis is interesting, and his respect for Williams comes shining through.

Also, I love the final sentence of this essay.

Read it if interested.


Thanks for sharing that Joan.

I think this was posted a bit back but the WAPO published this great analysis (same paper that printed the controversial article about race):

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/how-john-williamss-star-wars-score-subtly-pulls-us-to-the-dark-side/2019/12/13/be3ab50e-1b7d-11ea-87f7-f2e91143c60d_story.html

When I saw the film a few weeks ago, the score stood prominently in the forefront. I was so giddy when I saw the cameo too--I think my friends that I was watching the movie with thought I was a little crazy.

But the way he tied all of those themes together--it reminds me of the complexity of Shore's work on LOTR on a much more massive scale. One of these days, once these scores get a solid release, I'm looking forward to a marathon listening session.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2020 - 4:38 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

John, I don't remember if the article I just posted was posted here before today. Hope I didn't screw up.
Your article is very interesting. Thanks for posting it. Shore's LOTR scores were grand, but at least he didn't have to span over 40 years. To hear all of Williams' Star Wars score would be a marathon.

 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2020 - 5:05 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

To hear all of Williams' Star Wars score would be a marathon.

My nine-film iPod playlist – incorporating the expanded albums of Episodes IV-VI, and the original 17-cue Episode I release – comprises 161 'songs' that run a total 12 hours, 23 minutes!

 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2020 - 5:41 PM   
 By:   Adam B.   (Member)

Thank you, Joan.

I love that one line...

"...unlike Lucas, he (Williams) never brought dishonor to the series."

Ouch!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2020 - 5:46 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Wow, dogplant, over 12 hours on your IPod. That is a marathon.

Adam, yep thumbs up to "ouch."

My favorite line is the last one.

"But Williams always ensured that Star Wars sounded as special as it seemed in our dreams."

 
 Posted:   Jan 11, 2020 - 5:47 AM   
 By:   Gunnar   (Member)

Thank you for sharing this, Joan. I was aware of Lehman's catalogue, but it was interesting to read more about his motivations and Williams' body of work for STAR WARS in general.
I find it both paradoxical and amusing that under a certain perspective, one can see the sequel trilogy FILMS as non-canonical, while their scores definitely are part of the (musical) canon.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2020 - 12:08 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

About time someone noticed this wonderful score. I hope the essay inspires Williams to write more like it. There is already talk of a sequel.

 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2020 - 1:46 PM   
 By:   John Schuermann   (Member)

I was going to write:

"THIS SPOT RESERVED FOR CONDESCENDING ONYABIRRI COMMENT."

However, Onya already claimed his reservation, bypassing the maitre d'. Guess I'm a non-essential worker.

Onya, just know you don't need to rush to deflate someone's fond comments about a Williams score. I will always make sure there's a spot reserved for you smile

With love,

John

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2020 - 2:29 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I was going to write:

"THIS SPOT RESERVED FOR CONDESCENDING ONYABIRRI COMMENT."

However, Onya already claimed his reservation, bypassing the maitre d'. Guess I'm a non-essential worker.

Onya, just know you don't need to rush to deflate someone's fond comments about a Williams score. I will always make sure there's a spot reserved for you smile

With love,

John


I just called it "wonderful." Looks like someone needs to update his eyeglass prescription!

 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2020 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   John Schuermann   (Member)

I was going to write:

"THIS SPOT RESERVED FOR CONDESCENDING ONYABIRRI COMMENT."

However, Onya already claimed his reservation, bypassing the maitre d'. Guess I'm a non-essential worker.

Onya, just know you don't need to rush to deflate someone's fond comments about a Williams score. I will always make sure there's a spot reserved for you smile

With love,

John


I just called it "wonderful." Looks like someone needs to update his eyeglass prescription!


Perhaps! Onya, serious question - have you found a new appreciation of this music? My impression in the past is of you being extremely sarcastic about Williams output from about 1974 on...

So, is "wonderful" sarcasm or heartfelt? If the latter, apologies from me.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2020 - 3:23 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)



So, is "wonderful" sarcasm or heartfelt? If the latter, apologies from me.


My lifelong love of film music stems from:

"Dark Shadows" music by Robert Cobert; and
"Lost in Space" music by Bernard Herrmann and John Williams.

If listing Williams in my Big Three is not high enough praise for the board's Lucas/Spielberg contingent, then I'm at a loss.

 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2020 - 10:50 PM   
 By:   John Schuermann   (Member)



So, is "wonderful" sarcasm or heartfelt? If the latter, apologies from me.


My lifelong love of film music stems from:

"Dark Shadows" music by Robert Cobert; and
"Lost in Space" music by Bernard Herrmann and John Williams.

If listing Williams in my Big Three is not high enough praise for the board's Lucas/Spielberg contingent, then I'm at a loss.


Well, then, I was wrong. It has always seemed to me that you "bomb" Williams threads with sarcasm, or alternatively, damn with faint praise. But I shall no longer pretend to read your mind.

FWIW, I have no love of Lucas (been forcing myself to watch the Star Wars series after many years of the discs collecting dust on my shelf, so that I can finally either enjoy or endure the last one, which I have not seen yet). About the only appeal to me of Star Wars is the music, which I think is tremendous. I'm disappointed that the new Atmos mixes accompanying the 4K releases bury the scores under all the sound effects (with the original trilogy, you can barely hear the music at all).

I do have a love of most Spielberg, though, which I will happily defend.

 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2020 - 10:55 PM   
 By:   John Schuermann   (Member)

Onya, a point of commonality - it was Williams' Lost In Space music that got me interested in film music and film scoring in the first place.

That, and Akira Ifukube's work in the Godzilla series.

Oh yeah, and Williams' music for another Irwin Allen production, The Poseidon Adventure. Saw it in the theater as a little kid and the relentless 3/4 rhythm in the strings captivated me from the moment I heard it.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2020 - 7:14 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)



Well, then, I was wrong. It has always seemed to me that you "bomb" Williams threads with sarcasm, or alternatively, damn with faint praise. But I shall no longer pretend to read your mind.


The "Dog-Bites-Man" quality of the thread title was just too good to resist.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2020 - 8:22 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

The "Dog-Bites-Man" quality of the thread title was just too good to resist.

Guess I'm dense, but I have no idea what this statement means. Can you clarify?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2020 - 8:47 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

The "Dog-Bites-Man" quality of the thread title was just too good to resist.

Guess I'm dense, but I have no idea what this statement means. Can you clarify?


"Dog Bites Man" is not news. "Man Bites Dog" IS news. An old newspaper adage.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2020 - 9:55 AM   
 By:   JamesSullivan   (Member)

Thanks for sharing. I also agree with his last sentence about music in movies. I liked how the essay was written, and you can immediately see that professionals wrote it. When I tried to write a leadership essay, I didn’t really succeed, I used https://leadershiptroy.org/ because I needed inspiration. And the essay had a great analysis. And that's interesting that he talked about good music in most even bad movies .

 
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