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 Posted:   Feb 24, 2020 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   afn   (Member)

Doing a little Deborah Kerr retrospective, I just rewatched one of my all time favorite movies, QUO VADIS (1951), and during the Exit Music a thought came to my mind:

Isn't it quite paradoxical that these three or so minutes of music wonderfully wrap up and give some closure to the incredible and emotionally exhausting three hour experience before... - while at the same time this music is first and foremost supposed to just "exit" you out of the cinema, with hundreds of people pushing to the doors like in burning Rome?!

This means you were very much NOT supposed to keep sitting there and appreciate this final stroke of the cinematic masterpiece that had just been painted before your eyes and ears, no, get up, show's over, please leave the theater now!, and after maybe 45 seconds you stand outside the door and can still hear the wonderful music playing inside...

I wonder if anyone back then actually kept sitting there and listened to the very end...?

I actually had this very paradoxical experience already as a kid in a rerun of GONE WITH THE WIND in the early 80s when I was the last person inside the huge theater and an usher wanted me to leave, while Max Steiner was still mixing old tunes from the South with Tara's Theme. Sadly, I obeyed. Those were the days...

(In a way, the lengthy end title suites of especially 80s and 90s films took on the role of the old exit music, don't you think?)

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 24, 2020 - 4:08 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In a way, the lengthy end title suites of especially 80s and 90s films took on the role of the old exit music, don't you think?


Yes. And no one stays in the theater to listen to THAT either.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 24, 2020 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

In a way, the lengthy end title suites of especially 80s and 90s films took on the role of the old exit music, don't you think?


Yes. And no one stays in the theater to listen to THAT either.



I certainly do when I find the music interesting. I sat through every moment 1917 and thought it was the best film of 2019.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 24, 2020 - 6:23 PM   
 By:   scottweberpdx   (Member)

I often stay for the end credits...especially if the music was particularly good...it's often the best statement of all the themes! I did laugh, like the poster above, I just saw 1917 and sat through the credits just to enjoy the score on those big theatre speakers one last time :-)

 
 Posted:   Feb 25, 2020 - 4:41 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

Doing a little Deborah Kerr retrospective, I just rewatched one of my all time favorite movies, QUO VADIS (1951), and during the Exit Music a thought came to my mind:

Isn't it quite paradoxical that these three or so minutes of music wonderfully wrap up and give some closure to the incredible and emotionally exhausting three hour experience before... - while at the same time this music is first and foremost supposed to just "exit" you out of the cinema, with hundreds of people pushing to the doors like in burning Rome?!

This means you were very much NOT supposed to keep sitting there and appreciate this final stroke of the cinematic masterpiece that had just been painted before your eyes and ears, no, get up, show's over, please leave the theater now!, and after maybe 45 seconds you stand outside the door and can still hear the wonderful music playing inside...




Yes, composing Exit Music was very much a case of Love’s Labour’s Lost. I went to many roadshow presentations in the 1960s and never gave any thought to the fact that there was any music playing while we all got up from our seats and chatted about the film. In the general hubbub the music was heard more on a subliminal level than anything else. Those hard-tickets presentations usually had full attendance and it took all of the three minutes or so of music to play out before everyone had left. Certainly it would have seemed very odd to see someone still in their seat looking at the closed curtains, listening to the music. It was only on recordings that I was later able to fully appreciate some of that splendid Exit Music.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 25, 2020 - 5:28 AM   
 By:   keky   (Member)

I used to stay until the very end of the end credits if the music was worth it. Nowadays it's much rarer; either the music is not that good or I just simply lost patience and move with the crowd. The last time I stayed until the very end was Solo: A Star Wars Story. John Powell's score was magnificent, I had to enjoy it while it lasted.

 
 Posted:   Feb 25, 2020 - 11:15 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

I have ALWAYS stayed in the theater until the very last note has played of almost every movie I've ever seen., except as a young child with my parents who generally got up with the crowd. This has sometimes resulted in hostile glares from staff wanting to get on with cleaning up and my wife and I are often the only ones in the theater. At least, that was the case until the recent development of post credit scenes especially in Marvel films. But even with that incentive, most people still dash out immediately. Now maybe a handful stay...I think the most I've ever seen is maybe 20 people out of a full house when a film has not very-well-kept secret additional scene or two post credits.
If the music is truly awful, I'll make an exception.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2020 - 6:18 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Whenever I listen to the exit music for The Best Years Of Our Lives I like to think of being in a movie theatre in New York during its initial release (it opened precisely a week after m'folks married in NY, coincidentally). Being wowed by the picture and all not far from war's end, that sort of thing.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 10:33 AM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

For a long time, into the 70’s and 80’s, essentially before the advent of video, the existence of overture/entr’acte/exit music cues was a topic among film music collectors. There was an ongoing letter discussion in Pro Musica Sana, the printed journal of the Miklos Rozsa Society, sometimes with members with conflicting memories of what they had heard in theaters.

Eventually, in a later issue, someone presented a list they’d compiled of as many of these cues as had been agreed upon. But, even then, there were still only private recordings filtering around, and just about no commercial releases of them.

Curiously, BEN-HUR has always had overture/entr’acte, but has NEVER had any exit music, the intention being that nothing could top the epiphany at the end of the film.

Nowadays, just about the only time a composer gets to present their themes is during the final credit crawl. But, even then, their music is hemmed in by mostly unrelated pop songs, which I can live without.

(And, on the released CD, presuming there is one, there may not even be much music by the composer, but rather more “inspired by” pop songs. Yuck...)

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 10:43 AM   
 By:   tiomkinfan   (Member)

My family, friends and I began remaining to listen when we went to Star Wars back in 1977. Some of the credits were interesting too. The only roadshow I had seen was The Sound of Music, which had no exit music. Since then, I have caught several roadshows in limited, special engagements and always remain seated to listen to the score's wrap-up. It provides a satisfying conclusion to the experience.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 12:08 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

There's a related paradox: the more people who get screen credit, the fewer credits that will actually be seen by an audience. But of course being seen isn't the point. It's something that the caterers and drivers and assistant digital compositors can put on their resumes.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 12:11 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

For most of my life I've stayed to the bitter end as a matter of principle and loyalty to the great composers of the past. I finally capitulated just last year, thanks to the excessive credits and general mediocrity of today's music.

 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 1:09 PM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

For most of my life I've stayed to the bitter end as a matter of principle and loyalty to the great composers of the past. I finally capitulated just last year, thanks to the excessive credits and general mediocrity of today's music.

Me too! Of course multiplexes don’t encourage patrons lounging around in their seats when they turn the lights on and send the cleaners in.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 1:18 PM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

Whenever I listen to the exit music for The Best Years Of Our Lives I like to think of being in a movie theatre in New York during its initial release (it opened precisely a week after m'folks married in NY, coincidentally). Being wowed by the picture and all not far from war's end, that sort of thing.


Does the Blu Ray of Best Years of Our Lives have the Exit music? Was there ever an Overture for this film? I always assumed there was.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 1:18 PM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

Whenever I listen to the exit music for The Best Years Of Our Lives I like to think of being in a movie theatre in New York during its initial release (it opened precisely a week after m'folks married in NY, coincidentally). Being wowed by the picture and all not far from war's end, that sort of thing.


Does the Blu Ray of Best Years of Our Lives have the Exit music? Was there ever an Overture for this film? I always assumed there was.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   Les Jepson   (Member)

Older Brits, like me, will remember the mad panics to get out of the cinema at the end of the film, brilliant exit music or not. Back in the day the music was usually replaced by our national anthem with a still picture of Queen Elizabeth II on screen. The audience was expected to stand to attention during this. Failure to do so was looked on as slightly worse than selling secrets to the Russians.

 
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