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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Born Free
 
 Posted:   Feb 28, 2020 - 10:12 PM   
 By:   mplo   (Member)

I saw the movie "Born Free" back in late 1966, when it first came out, and also read the book on which it was based, as well. Both the movie "Born Free" and the book on which it was based were excellent.

 
 Posted:   Feb 29, 2020 - 2:53 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I saw the movie "Born Free" back in late 1966, when it first came out, and also read the book on which it was based, as well. Both the movie "Born Free" and the book on which it was based were excellent.

I've not read the book but seen the film a number of times (though not on the big screen) ... it was one I bought on DVD many years ago for my children (I think my daughter enjoyed it as much, if not more ... ) and having long disposed of it ...

... I bought the BluRay release a few weeks ago. I admit this is to obtain John Barry's superb soundtrack (the FSM release is that of the album recording of the score) but I shall, no doubt, enjoy the film once again smile

Welcome to the board!
Mitch

 
 Posted:   Apr 20, 2020 - 2:57 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Iconic theme. My FSM is still sealed in its wrapper, in which state it has remained for . . . well, it's been several years now. I can't bear the thought of opening it.

I think of The Belstone Fox as the companion piece to Born Free. Both films were directed by James Hill, who also appears not to have taken any chances with his ideas on TBF, because he also wrote the screenplay, in which he kept the storyline ideas free of complication. For me, personally, this is a classic 70s film, cut from the same cloth as Born Free. I also have the Laurie Johnson score for it, produced by Dragon's Domain.

I sometimes wonder how Laurie Johnson approached his composition task when he had John Barry's very tough cookie to live up to, not to mention the same director to try and please. I think he did a pretty good job.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2020 - 3:24 PM   
 By:   shureman   (Member)

I like THE BELSTONE FOX score much more than the Barry. We played the film in Toronto back in 1973...it didn't draw flies but I went crazy over the score and got a complimentary LP from Rank. I wish the original music tracks could have been used for the Dragon's Den release, rather than an LP dub...

 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2020 - 7:59 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

I think, shureman, TBF LP was not a rerecording. It looks as though all the music on the LP is original score from the film, although, I don't know how much music from the film is not on the album/CD.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2020 - 12:24 PM   
 By:   shureman   (Member)

Yes, the LP was actually the recording used in the film. My point was the quality of the DD CD which, to me, obviously came from an LP dub rather than the master tapes...

 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2020 - 1:42 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Yes, the LP was actually the recording used in the film. My point was the quality of the DD CD which, to me, obviously came from an LP dub rather than the master tapes...

There was that controversy when Ford first began being bombarded with an answer to that very question when the DD release was imminent. I realised that would be as good as it would get so bought it anyway. For your information, I did find someone had uploaded a good presentation of the film to YouTube, where it can be seen in its original ratio from the Todd - AO 35 print. Not that I approve of such things, however, if you've never seen it I suppose now is as good a time as any.

Just type in "The Belstone Fox" and select the version with length 1:43:16. The film's framing and cinematography is a winner.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2020 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   Chris Malone   (Member)

What I remember most about this much appreciated CD from FSM is how and where I played it.

It was during a time that I was doing a lot of local and international travel. John Barry’s score somehow ticked the boxes of being at times joyful, sorrowful, and action orientated—several moods.

The other Barry score I was playing a lot at that time was The Quiller Memorandum.

Funny how I link both, in particular Born Free, with locations and work rather than the images from the film! Do you have a similar experience with Born Free or another score?

Chris

 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2020 - 5:45 PM   
 By:   Saul Pincus   (Member)

Funny how I link both, in particular Born Free, with locations and work rather than the images from the film! Do you have a similar experience with Born Free or another score?

Hi Chris! For me it's Barry's Moviola Vol.1, Playing by Heart, and Raise the Titanic (re-recording) – all of which I associate strongly with my travels to and through the west coast of North America and my time in Los Angeles in the mid to late 90s. They still conjure the Napa and San Fernando valleys whenever I hear them. A time of great personal and professional adventure by plane, train and automobile.

Barry's (unrivalled, I think) facility for sumptuous melancholy lures me always. With Born Free, Monte Walsh, and other fairly obscure movies (to this Canadian), I only ever had the soundtrack to go by. Doesn't seem to matter as much with Barry's work, since much like John Williams, his album assemblies work so well and make it a cinch for the listener to enter their sonic world.

Oh, and then there's Thomas Newman's excellent and atypical The Good German, which I always associate with Lane Cove, Sydney, Melbourne, and lamingtons!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2020 - 6:45 PM   
 By:   Chris Malone   (Member)

Hi Saul! Thanks so much for sharing your detailed thoughts. This is the sort of post I love reading. It was wonderful to finally see you on the FSM Zoom meetup as well.

I completely agree with you about the John Barry melancholy. There’s something special about how he reaches towards that feeling and I’ve wondered what he drew on himself to get there.

What is fascinating about his music is how it seems to inadvertently “line up” with imagery in my real world. I seem to recall an interview where Barry himself noted this happened for him (with other music) driving around New York. Barry’s music seems to do it more than other composers for me. Maybe I listen to his music more than others! But maybe it’s the way he conveys a sort of inner monologue of mood.

I remember a strange coincidence listening to my pre-iPod music device during my time living in the UK. My National Rail train was pulling into Waterloo station and I then needed to switch to my local tube train. It was during rush hour, so it was all quite bustling with people. The “Street Chase” from Thunderball just started with the entry of the OO7 theme being perfectly timed to the doors opening on one train. The bulk of the cue played with me, like James Bond, walking through the masses of people across platforms and to and from escalators. I made it to my tube train, the doors closed perfectly in time with the brass stinger at the end. Phew.

Stay safe and go well!

Chris

 
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