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 Posted:   May 23, 2020 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Any examples of composers not being aware of their music having been released on record, and expressing their surprise over such releases? I guess they don't always have control of those processes if they don't have the rights to the music.

 
 Posted:   May 23, 2020 - 4:37 PM   
 By:   Warlok   (Member)

Would I be wrong to theorize that John Barry may have been such a composer?

I imagine Morricone for sure... if by nothing else the sheer multiplicity of his scores.

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2020 - 1:27 PM   
 By:   KC   (Member)

I have read rumours that Morricone (or his associates) in the past few years stopped albums from being released, even if they were ready to be, or were already pressed. 'Seven Guns For The MacGregors' was apparently such a case.

Maybe the Music Box Records album of Morricone's 'Orca', which was suddenly pulled back after its release, was another case, but I guess the real reason behind this strange story is not publicly known.

 
 Posted:   May 25, 2020 - 1:52 PM   
 By:   SBD   (Member)

Possibly apocryphal, but I remember hearing that Trevor Jones expressed surprise at Dominick and Eugene getting released.

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2020 - 3:27 PM   
 By:   Anacleto   (Member)

I am aware of one case although I cannot verify it. Malcolm Arnold was not aware that his score
to "David Copperfield" (1970) was put out on LP. I heard that somebody send him a copy of the
disc and he was flabbergasted. The disc - released on GRT Records- did have a very short life span. Perhaps Mr. Arnold had something to do with its withdrawal. I never did hear the complete
story.

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2020 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

A friend of mine asked Bill Conti to sign his Murderers Among Us CD, to which Conti responded "This got released?"

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2020 - 12:22 AM   
 By:   JB Fan   (Member)


A friend of mine asked Bill Conti to sign his Murderers Among Us CD, to which Conti responded "This got released?"

That's bit strange, because when BSX re-issued it in complete form, they offered Maestro Conti's autographed copies (I got one of them!).
Maybe he was surprised that such "unknown" score was released back in 1990 (by Bay City)?

 
 Posted:   May 26, 2020 - 12:54 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

I have read rumours that Morricone (or his associates) in the past few years stopped albums from being released, even if they were ready to be, or were already pressed. 'Seven Guns For The MacGregors' was apparently such a case.

Maybe the Music Box Records album of Morricone's 'Orca', which was suddenly pulled back after its release, was another case, but I guess the real reason behind this strange story is not publicly known.


I thought the orca was a copyright problem to do with inclusion of one track ?

And with Morricone, there has been much rivalry between labels, some vying for daddy's love to be the favourite child.... frown

 
 Posted:   May 26, 2020 - 3:48 AM   
 By:   Lokutus   (Member)

Possibly apocryphal, but I remember hearing that Trevor Jones expressed surprise at Dominick and Eugene getting released.


Jones is usually surprised by everything... since is he so uncooperative.
he was surprised by Cliffhanger as well - the Intrada edition.

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2020 - 4:28 AM   
 By:   craig2   (Member)

Any examples of composers not being aware of their music having been released on record, and expressing their surprisde over such releases? I guess they don't always have control of those processes if they don't have the rights to the music.

Alex North: THE BAD SEED and THE RAINMAKER.

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2020 - 5:16 AM   
 By:   martyn.crosthwaite   (Member)

Any examples of composers not being aware of their music having been released on record, and expressing their surprisde over such releases? I guess they don't always have control of those processes if they don't have the rights to the music.

When I met Roy Budd for the first time I had several LP covers for him to sign. When he came to The Stone Killer [Italian release ] he was totally shocked and even asked me to get him a copy !!!!!!

 
 Posted:   May 26, 2020 - 5:23 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Thats a quality story martyn.

 
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2020 - 8:40 AM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)


A friend of mine asked Bill Conti to sign his Murderers Among Us CD, to which Conti responded "This got released?"

That's bit strange, because when BSX re-issued it in complete form, they offered Maestro Conti's autographed copies (I got one of them!).
Maybe he was surprised that such "unknown" score was released back in 1990 (by Bay City)?


It was the Bay Cities release he was asked to sign.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2020 - 8:43 PM   
 By:   Steve H   (Member)

Would I be wrong to theorize that John Barry may have been such a composer?



I don't know? I remember listening to a recent podcast of an old interview with Barry where he was aware of a lot of Japanese pressings out there as well as the old boot of Robin and Marion.
It was a great interview by the way.

 
 Posted:   May 27, 2020 - 9:06 PM   
 By:   VeronicaMars   (Member)

The two best stories I can share are

John Scott when he found out that his score for "The Final Countdown" was released as an unmentionable. He was absolutely shocked and then finally put out a "legal" complete release on his own label, JOS Records years later.

The other is when I met James Newton Howard in person at a signing for "The Dark Knight" and when I mentioned one of my all time favorite scores of his "Falling Down" and uttered while signing my booklet (his own words) "Don't you know there's a bootleg?" I was stunned by that because most composers are sometimes oblivious to this sorta thing and there are others that I've met, who are completely aware of it and is the only way their music is out there.

Going back to Trevor Jones, He's stopped so many releases and expansions in the past like when La-La was going to do "Excalibur" and they were close to doing it but Jones put a kabash to that along with The Dark Crystal's original tracks as well. Then again, he was surprised that "Cliffhanger" got released and that's a good sign since Sony owns it. A shame we won't see DC unless he changes his mind and soon.

John Scott also prevented a complete and expanded "Greystoke" over ten years ago because he wanted to release it personally and put a kabash to La-La's plans on that one too. Thankfully, Disney didn't grant him the rights to "Shoot to Kill" which he was going to release on his label in 2002 and Intrada did that one almost 10 years later.

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2020 - 2:00 AM   
 By:   Laurent78   (Member)

This kind of story indeed happens. I still can remember vividly this one with Morricone: with three other friends, we attended the dress rehearsal of the Cantata per l'Europa in 1988 in Belgium, met the composer and his manager Enrico de Melis right after it. One of the friends handed over the Canadian LP of OCCHIO ALLA PENNA (the one the French title ON M'APPELLE MALABAR) to the Maestro who stared at it, turned it over. It was obvious that he had never seen it before. He discussed the matter with De Melis and both couldn't help but checked at once if it was a legit release or not!

 
 Posted:   May 28, 2020 - 2:35 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

This kind of story indeed happens. I still can remember vividly this one with Morricone: with three other friends, we attended the dress rehearsal of the Cantata per l'Europa in 1988 in Belgium, met the composer and his manager Enrico de Melis right after it. One of the friends handed over the Canadian LP of OCCHIO ALLA PENNA (the one the French title ON M'APPELLE MALABAR) to the Maestro who stared at it, turned it over. It was obvious that he had never seen it before. He discussed the matter with De Melis and both couldn't help but checked at once if it was a legit release or not!

I'll bet that was a tense moment for you!

 
 Posted:   May 28, 2020 - 2:47 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

I don't know what Barry was aware of and what he wasn't.

I suspect he was more on-the-ball with what was coming out in in the 60s/70s/80s than he was in the 90s and 00s, but this is purely my hallucination.

I'll tell you this, though—he was happy to sign bootlegs even though he complained about them.

At the 1998 signing at HMV I just stood there and watched as people put bootlegs in front of him and he signed them all without complaint. Mostly LPs of Walkabout and Robin and Marian.

I guess the owners might not have known they were bootlegs, but JB was happy to sign them anyway.

Cheers

 
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