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 Posted:   Jul 27, 2020 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

The Blue Max.

No contest!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2020 - 11:49 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Hey Thor, shall we resurrect a few of the myriad LONG threads on this topic? razz

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2020 - 1:04 PM   
 By:   Mose Harper   (Member)

I'll just go ahead and post this in this thread as it's the most current-

I was thinking about getting a recording of Korngold's Adventures Of Robin Hood.

Since I'm leaning towards getting the Chandos Film Music release with Sea Wolf and a smattering of AoRH, how would people rate the program there? Does those sixteen minutes contain a good distillation of the major themes and motifs- or is it's inclusion more just to pad out the running time?

If I decided to got for a more complete package, would people recommend the eighties Varese re-recording with the Utah Symphony or the latter, more complete Stromberg w/ Moscow Symphony?
How about audio quality (mixing/mastering) between the two?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2020 - 1:08 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

When you consider sound quality into the mix, I'd say "most of them".

Yes, that's pretty much my view as well, especially for scores of a certain age -- let's say before the 1960s, just to put up some random cutoff mark. For scores as old as the 30s and 40s, I tend to ALWAYS get the rerecording.

This old, legendary thread might be of interest in regard to this issue:

https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=11030&forumID=1&archive=1

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2020 - 1:15 AM   
 By:   Ford A. Thaxton   (Member)

The Missouri Breaks (John Williams)


The soundtrack recording was done in New York and for a variety of reasons Williams wasn't very happy with it, so he got UA RECORDS to re-record the score with LA players whom he was much happier with for the soundtrack album release.

Great Album BTW IMHO, a score written for something like a 10 piece group that is a rather interesting item in Williams catalogue.


Ford A. Thaxton

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2020 - 2:13 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

When you consider sound quality into the mix, I'd say "most of them".

Yes, that's pretty much my view as well, especially for scores of a certain age -- let's say before the 1960s, just to put up some random cutoff mark. For scores as old as the 30s and 40s, I tend to ALWAYS get the rerecording.


Yes, obviously a modern recording will sound better than an old mono recording of the 30s and 40s.

As far as classical music is concerned, I'd say most recordings from the 60s on can sound terrific. I recently listened to a remastered Karajan recording of Beethoven's 4th symphony (from the 60s cycle) and it just sounds great. That's probably because they were recorded to sound great and labels such as Deutsche Grammophon take care of their master tapes and keep them in a specially temperated vault. When they are then remastered with modern technology, they sound splendid.

Film scores on the other hand are sometimes stored in rusty old cans in some overheated storage shed or wherever, so the tapes are often in less than pristine conditions. So there are some older recordings from the 60s that can sound great (like for example Goldsmith's album recording of HOUR OF THE GUN) while there are scores recorded much later in the 70s that sound poor, simply because the sources were poor.

I'm always happy when good film scores get re-recorded, simply because I want music to live and breathe.

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2020 - 5:21 AM   
 By:   Ratatouille   (Member)

This one !

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2020 - 3:56 PM   
 By:   Amer Zahid   (Member)

Both Joel McNeely and James Conlon recordings of VERTIGO

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2020 - 4:11 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

It’s weird, but I always preferred the re-recorded end titles from Shoot to Kill from the varese compilation more than the film version. Probably just because I listened to that CD for years before finally getting the Intrada one. The little Jazzy sax solo at the end just isn’t the same.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2020 - 6:24 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

As far as classical music is concerned, I'd say most recordings from the 60s on can sound terrific. I recently listened to a remastered Karajan recording of Beethoven's 4th symphony (from the 60s cycle) and it just sounds great. That's probably because they were recorded to sound great and labels such as Deutsche Grammophon take care of their master tapes and keep them in a specially temperated vault. When they are then remastered with modern technology, they sound splendid.

Oh yes, I have several of the Karajan/DG recordings from the 60s and even 50s, and they sound splendid. Alas, this kind of care never took place for film score recordings.

 
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