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 Posted:   Aug 5, 2020 - 4:15 AM   
 By:   jsmiley108   (Member)

Just curious as to which composers (since directors/editors started using temp tracks) have stuck to their guns and not been dictated to by the temp track. There may even be some (rare) situations where the director encouraged them not to follow the temp track. You may not be a fan of said composer, but who has been consistent in sticking to their own voice?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2020 - 7:10 AM   
 By:   lacoq   (Member)

First and foremost Bernard Herrmann....

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2020 - 7:23 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

In the nowadays, I imagine ANY composer who doesn't deliver the music the director/producers want will lose the gig and they would hire someone else.
Even some of John Williams' scores for Spielberg clearly reveal the temp-tracks (HOOK alone has Dave Grusin music and AGNES OF GOD by Georges Delerue quite clearly).

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2020 - 7:28 AM   
 By:   Mike Petersen   (Member)

I think it was Bruce Broughton who said (and I paraphrase) "Most people follow the temp track as closely as possible without getting sued, but I try to stay as far away from the temp without getting fired."

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2020 - 8:47 AM   
 By:   Dylan   (Member)

It feels like almost everything I hear in a new film, tv show, or commercial was temped with "Inception," "The Social Network," "Stranger Things," or a random Max Richter/Thomas Newman cue. Hearing a modern score without any of these influences is pretty rare, which speaks to the probably that most composers follow a temp rather than going against it.

Silver age composers like John Barry or Elmer Bernstein always fought to stick to their vision, which sometimes got them fired (or their scores tossed later on). Bernstein was probably the most vocal in his opposition of temp tracks.

I'm guessing most composers in 2020 aren't used to having anything even remotely resembling the creative freedom Elmer Bernstein had, and the style of scoring now being so streamlined makes it easier than ever to find a same day replacement if a composer puts their foot down in the face of artistic integrity. As a result, the culture is now littered with riffs on the "Inception" horn of doom.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2020 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   Lokutus   (Member)

Desplat on Polanski's films, Marco on TLJ's... since they DON'T use temp tracks...
the rest is another story.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2020 - 6:50 PM   
 By:   LordDalek   (Member)

Alex North on 2001 and we all know how that turned out.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2020 - 3:26 AM   
 By:   jsmiley108   (Member)

ABC Classic (Australian classical music station) are having a morning feature on Max Richter this week and they played a piece of film music yesterday which seemed fairly unique, that's why I posted the question.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2020 - 4:03 AM   
 By:   jsmiley108   (Member)

I am a huge Williams fan, but this video is pretty interesting (even though I find them rather annoying/obnoxious lol)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DN3vl-JnUF8

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2020 - 5:29 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Surely, Morricone was a man who followed his own path, and didn't easily succumb to temp tracks (per that famous quote of his where he "fires" directors he's not pleased with). Although I'm sure you experts can find examples where he actually did.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2020 - 6:09 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

Morricone's back catalogue is rife with classical quotations, but who knows if he was asked to follow them, or they were just inserts he liked for himself (much like many John Williams classical riffs).

 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2020 - 7:19 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

Morricone's back catalogue is rife with classical quotations, but who knows if he was asked to follow them, or they were just inserts he liked for himself (much like many John Williams classical riffs).

Hi keV,

It has always been my understanding.that the classical quotes (at least in his western scores) were his 'jokes ' . It was kind of a reply to the fact that John Ford western etc. used to quote the American songs all the time . Maybe Ennio didn't like them ?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2020 - 7:25 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

That's my impression too. The quotes are more intentional references, and not something resulting from a temp track.

 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2020 - 11:06 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

That's my impression too. The quotes are more intentional references, and not something resulting from a temp track.

I think it was Christopher Frayling who said ( either written or spoken, can't quite recall) that in a scene where Fonda is riding his horse are the chords from Mozart's Don Giovanni. Now I wouldn't have noticed that even if you'd bit me over the head with them.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2020 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   ClaytonMG   (Member)

I actually remember Hans Zimmer saying that Sherlock Holmes was temped with The Dark Knight and they deviated from that quite a bit...

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 8, 2020 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

John Corigliano cringed when he saw the rough cut of Altered States -- which was temptracked with Bartok and Stravinsky, and gave the film (in his words) a "creature features" feel.

Fortunately Ken Russell agreed with Corigliano's assessment and encouraged him to be experimental.


And obviously Vangelis did not follow the Planet of the Apes and Humanoids from the Deep temp music in Blade Runner!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 8, 2020 - 9:00 AM   
 By:   jsmiley108   (Member)

What about Jerry Goldsmith?

 
 Posted:   Aug 8, 2020 - 4:17 PM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

First and foremost Bernard Herrmann....

Unless the temp track was Bernard Herrmann.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 8, 2020 - 8:08 PM   
 By:   lacoq   (Member)

First and foremost Bernard Herrmann....

Unless the temp track was Bernard Herrmann.



Wrong...Herrmann didn’t want to hear ANY temp music. When Brian De Palma first showed Herrmann a rough cut of Obsession De Palma put in some of Benny's music. Herrmann went ballistic and screamed
at De Palma to “shut that off!”

 
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