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 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 10:45 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

Which scores wrap themselves around you and create a sound world like no other.
You put them on and suddenly you are transported to a time and place like no other, due to the mesmerising tunes from the music.
The scores of Jack Nitzsche tend to do this for me.
I don't have the musical vernacular to describe how he builds his scores, but they tend to wind in upon themselves and meet/end where they began. Very hypnotic.
Indeed, the idea for this thread was created whilst I was traveling on a journey of sound and mind, to the strains of Nitzsche's CUTTER'S WAY, a truly mesmerising score if ever there was one.
What say yours?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I'm not sure what you're after, exactly, it's a little vague. But plenty of 'ambient' scores that are hypnotic. Michael Stearn's CHRONOS is one within that idiom I have enjoyed lately. But there are loads others, depending on how you define it.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 10:56 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

I want more than mere drones and ambience, Thor.
I want thought and musical architecture.
Not an elbow resting on a key pad.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 10:59 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I mean 'ambient' as in the genre - you know, like Brian Eno, Future Sound of London, Shpongle, that kind of stuff. CHRONOS is a sophisticated score that develops slowly and gradually over the course of its 40-minute single-track duration. It occasionally reminds me of JM Jarre's excellent "Waiting for Costeau".

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 11:18 AM   
 By:   Steven Lloyd   (Member)

My first two choices among scores for lulling, hypnotic qualities are Philip Glass's POWAQAATSI and Goldsmith's BASIC INSTINCT.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 11:43 AM   
 By:   FalkirkBairn   (Member)

The first score that comes to mind is Howard Shore's EXISTENZ. From the opening track to the end it quickly establishes a mesmerising and hypnotic feel. Even during the more animated action sequences the music doesn't really veer far away from the hypnotic feel.

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 11:53 AM   
 By:   Valiant65   (Member)

Immediately I thought of "Spellbound" by Miklos Rozsa.

I remember years ago playing John Barry's "The Knack" soundtrack for the first time and being sent into a dizzy state of being. In a good way of course. I was hypnotised to play it over and over again.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   Chris Irving   (Member)

I agree with Basic Instinct and Spellbound.

I would add Herrman's Vertigo, Rachel Portman's Never Let Me Go, and Alexandre Desplat's Birth.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 12:29 PM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

Yes, this is more like it.
Follow their leads, Thor. Quit being such a computer wink
There are no rules or structures or parameters.
You just know when a certain score wraps you into its web with its distinctive vibe or mesmeric mood.

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 12:37 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Badalamenti: Mulholland Dr.

Some droning, but largely a unique, varied soundscape for Lynch's mesmerizing mind-trip.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   Mark   (Member)

For me Jocelyn Pook's Masked Ball music from Eyes Wide Shut is one of the most hypnotic pieces of music ever.

Most things by Glass and Nyman send me into a trance also. And talking of Glass, there is a wonderful one hour loop of Zimmer's Interstellar that is very hypnotic. Both the Blade Runner scores too.

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

Michael Nyman's The End Of The Affair is one that always drew me in like a hypnotic piece. Although maybe less so now as I'm so familiar with it. Still love it though.

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 1:28 PM   
 By:   jkruppa   (Member)

I think Cliff Martinez's score for Soderbergh's version of Solaris fits the description of hypnotic very well.

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 1:58 PM   
 By:   Mike Esssss   (Member)

I think Cliff Martinez's score for Soderbergh's version of Solaris fits the description of hypnotic very well.

Also his DRIVE.

Goldenthal's HEAT, even separate from the rest of that brilliantly curated soundtrack, does the transportive trick for me every time.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 2:00 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

There are no rules or structures or parameters.

You said it. Clearly, 'hypnotic' means something else to me than others. That's both the benefit and drawback of vague/broad topics, you get all kinds of interpretations. smile

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 2:04 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

I think Cliff Martinez's score for Soderbergh's version of Solaris fits the description of hypnotic very well.

Also his DRIVE.

Goldenthal's HEAT, even separate from the rest of that brilliantly curated soundtrack, does the transportive trick for me every time.


This. And ennio's Dreams may come

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 2:04 PM   
 By:   Saul Pincus   (Member)

Movie themselves are, at their basis, a form of hypnosis.

For me, Herrmann was the master of musical hypnosis (VERTIGO is the first thing that comes to mind) and often have a 'wraparound structure', followed by Morricone.

Williams' The Fortress of Solitude was, at the time, my go-to 'hypnosis' cue.

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 2:09 PM   
 By:   No Respectable Gentleman   (Member)

BIRTH by Alexandre Desplat.

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 2:13 PM   
 By:   Mose Harper   (Member)

Many scores by Martinez fit that criteria for me as well, though I haven't played those as much these past couple years. In the case of Drive and Neon Demon I also don't mind the "pop" songs included on the soundtracks and find them to fit the mood. Spring Breakers is the exception, though Martinez's instrumental tracks are as hypnotic there as anything he's ever done.

Zbigniew Preisner's - Aglaja and especially Lost And Love- also do this for me.

A couple of Zimmer's (Thin Red Line and Last Samurai) lull me into a state where I'm more emotionally invested by the end, than I ever thought I would be at the beginning.

Small's Marathon Man is another score that snuck up on me and had me more affected by the end than I expected.
I needed to acclimate to it after a couple listens. The first time I heard it I thought it was too repetitive, too slight, and generally underwhelming. Eventually I came to love it and it spurred me to seek out more of his work.

Doyle's Great Expectations
Herrmann's TZ ep Walking Distance
Laurent Perez Del Mars' La Tortue Rogue (The Red Turtle)
Morricone's Butterfly
Yared' L'Amant (The Lover)
Barry's The Besty, Walkabout, and Somewhere In Time
Desplat's La Fille Du Puistier (The Well Digger's Daughter)
are all cases where I remember being compelled to stop what I was doing (usually reading something) and surrender to just listening and musing.

They all continue to weave spells for me.

I just remembered my reaction to Shore's Silence Of The Lambs was much more intense than I expected too. Hypnotic isn't the word I would have immediately thought of- but I keep going back to it and getting lost in it each time so I guess that is exactly what it's effect on me is.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2020 - 6:22 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

You ... WILL ... obey.



There's hypnotism for ya'.

Insteada watchin' Star Wars in 1977, the 12-year-old Kevin McGann shoulda been watchin' repeats of Jon Pertwee's DOCTOR WHO.

 
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