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 Posted:   Nov 19, 2020 - 4:30 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Of all things, I'm watching The Giant Behemoth, a horror flick I'd seen on TV countless times as a youngster, and the memory of being entranced by a simple cue back then...well, it did it to me again. The frenzy within the evacuation of London gave way to deserted streets, and for the latter Edwin Astley composed a simple ostinato (I think) accompanied by an ascending solo clarinet (I know). This is stillness captured musically. Such a contrast to the scenes of death and destruction.

Ernest Gold did something similar in On The Beach. I'm thinking of deserted San Francisco and San Diego and the cues “The Desolate City” and “The Mysterious Signal.”

Then again there's John Williams and the table and ceremonial saké and the great calm-down after the frenetic glory of the “Cadillac of the Skies” doing its thing.

There must be more examples. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 19, 2020 - 2:49 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

Day the Earth Stand Still

The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 19, 2020 - 2:55 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Day the Earth Stand Still

Stand back ... and stand by. smile

 
 Posted:   Nov 19, 2020 - 3:11 PM   
 By:   Mike Esssss   (Member)

"Ben Gardner's Boat" from JAWS smile

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 19, 2020 - 4:44 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Day the Earth Stand Still

YES, when Superman cradles Lois after the San Andreas had gone ballistic. And before he goes ballistic and spins Planet Houston on its axis. From disaster to standstill to fury. Another JW gem...wink

 
 Posted:   Nov 19, 2020 - 6:40 PM   
 By:   Valiant65   (Member)

How about "The World, The Flesh and the Devil" by Miklos Rozsa. There's a track called "A Second Survivor" that is kind of melancholy.

And why not "Fragments of a Prayer" from "Children of Men" by John Tavener.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2020 - 9:04 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Hmmmm. I'm not quite sure I understand the topic. I guess it could be interpreted in different ways. But I'm thinking of the last scene of INCEPTION -- Zimmer's soft piano chords over the spinning spinner. That's a moment of standstill, but also of uncertainty.

Similarly, I'm thinking of the opening of ALIEN. Yes, it's more 'the solitude of space' than standstill, but I define it as a 'deceptive standstill', as the corridors are actually teeming with life, or at least suggestive of it. Goldsmith's echoey two-note motif for flutes disappearing into the distance, and merging with the ship's engine, connotes standstill, or at least anticipation for life to BREAK the standstill.

 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2020 - 9:10 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

The Battle of the Mutara Nebula from Star Trek II TWOK. The scene where Enterprise and Reliant lose visual contact with one another and drift towards a head on collision.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2020 - 4:52 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Hmmmm. I'm not quite sure I understand the topic. I guess it could be interpreted in different ways. But I'm thinking of the last scene of INCEPTION -- Zimmer's soft piano chords over the spinning spinner. That's a moment of standstill, but also of uncertainty.

Similarly, I'm thinking of the opening of ALIEN. Yes, it's more 'the solitude of space' than standstill, but I define it as a 'deceptive standstill', as the corridors are actually teeming with life, or at least suggestive of it. Goldsmith's echoey two-note motif for flutes disappearing into the distance, and merging with the ship's engine, connotes standstill, or at least anticipation for life to BREAK the standstill.


"Different ways." Yes. Started off with a pair of examples of deserted cities with buildings intact and all signs of habitation yet not an inhabitant in sight. And indeed, the music trails off often in standstill moments. You have broadened the scope nicely.

Perhaps a dynamic example is Grofé's "Sunset" from Grand Canyon Suite. That is a piece that never ceases to sooth. And it became "film music" in the short Disney production where the picture, in effect, underscored the music. I came to the movement later in life via an LP but recall seeing that little picture as a youngster in school. May have influenced a burgeoning interest in film music!

PS
oh my...yeah you can see the film but it's hard to top L. Bernstein--

 
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