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 Posted:   Jan 16, 2021 - 7:19 AM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

All 15?

Indeed, though it varies with each score (even various cues within each score). One of the worst offenders is the stereo version of "King Kong vs. Godzilla", which originally has no reverb.

When I lived in Texas, I had access to the Futureland releases, which someone I used to know owns. He also had rips of the boxes. While I despise piracy of music, it did allow me to compare the Futureland releases with the Perfect Collection boxes. In most cases, the Futureland releases sounded better overall, despite some noticeable tape deterioration. They're likely as close to hearing the tapes themselves as we can get.

The boxes tended to address the deterioration, but the added reverb bogs it down, though does help with any cue that has abrupt edits or abrupt endings, which would have sounded a bit jarring otherwise.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2021 - 4:17 PM   
 By:   John Schuermann   (Member)

I have both the Futureland and Perfect Box releases - agree the reverb added for the Perfect Box obscures detail and represents an unfortunate altering of the original recordings. They could use some help, but not that kind of "help."

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2021 - 4:50 PM   
 By:   Marko   (Member)

I also think some of the Heisei scores (Perfect Box) don’t sound as good either compared to the Futureland releases.

 
 Posted:   Jan 17, 2021 - 8:59 AM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

I have both the Futureland and Perfect Box releases - agree the reverb added for the Perfect Box obscures detail and represents an unfortunate altering of the original recordings. They could use some help, but not that kind of "help."

Indeed! They also did other things to obscure or even completely remove some detail. One thing that seriously bothered me was removing studio noise heard in some cues from "Godzilla" '54. The most notable is Godzilla Re-Landing (M14) (actual cue number is DB-30 M-14=A). The start of that cue has what sounds like chairs and/or instruments moving around. This was removed with the Perfect Collection version of the score.


I also think some of the Heisei scores (Perfect Box) don’t sound as good either compared to the Futureland releases.

In addition, most of the Heisei scores were better presented with those older releases, such as Akira Ifukube Complete Recordings 9, 10 (which I own) and 11 from Futureland as well as Kitty Records' two disc release of "Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla". The one exception is "Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah", with the Perfect Collection version being far better presented.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 4:06 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Two questions:
What was the previous stereo release for "King Kong vs. Godzilla"?
What were the source tapes for the original Futureland releases?

 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 5:19 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

Two questions:
What was the previous stereo release for "King Kong vs. Godzilla"?
What were the source tapes for the original Futureland releases?


The stereo version of "King Kong vs. Godzilla" was first released (at least on CD) on Complete Recordings: Akira Ifukube Special Effects Music Toho · Daiei Edition (TYCY-5215·16), released by Futureland in 1992. It's included on the first disc, along with selected cues from "Osaka Castle Story" (1961). The second disc has the score to "Whale God" and selected cues from "Adventure in Kigan Castle" (1966).

The original master tapes were used for the Futureland releases, aside from the aforementioned stereo version of "King Kong vs. Godzilla", which was sourced from the four-track magnetic film elements. Later Futureland releases of Ifukube's non-Godzilla monster films (the Toho Monster Film Selection series) included transcriptions of the cue sheets that are stored with the tapes (housed in the boxes). Releases since often included cue sheet transcriptions (like the Perfect Collection boxes) or photos of the cue sheets themselves, such as the 2014 King Records LP release of "Godzilla" '54 and "King Kong vs. Godzilla" and a number of Cinema-kan's releases.

Fun fact, the tapes for "Godzilla", "Rodan" and "The Mysterians" are labeled "For Overseas Version" on the cue sheets. They are the same recordings used for the Japanese versions of the films though.

Below are cue sheets for reels Original 1 and 2 for "Godzilla" '54, from the booklet of the 2014 LP release:







 
 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 6:06 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

I guess the lesson to be learned is, all the lucky bastards that have the Futureland CD's better hold onto them.

I sure wish I was one of them.

 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 6:37 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

I guess the lesson to be learned is, all the lucky bastards that have the Futureland CD's better hold onto them.

I sure wish I was one of them.


On the bright side, most aren't too difficult to come across. I recently obtained several of them, most of which were still sealed (three were opened but still in their original shrink wrap and in pristine condition), at unbeatable prices. The majority of them were from the Toho Monster Film Selection series, but I did get a copy of Godzilla vs. Hedorah (which is my favorite Godzilla score) and Complete Recordings: Akira Ifukube Toho Special Effects Film Music 10, which is the two disc release of "Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II". The most expensive of the bunch I obtained was $60, and that was for a sealed copy of "Space Amoeba".

I've seen many used copies of the Futureland releases for as low as $15 at places such as Yahoo Japan Auction, which was where I obtained one of those releases (a sealed copy of "Rodan").

I have added all of the albums except for Hedorah and Complete Recordings 10 (which are coming soon) to my blog if you or anyone else would like information on them. A link to my blog is included with my profile info if interested. It's nothing special, as it's mainly a database for the Japanese film and television music albums in my collection.

 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 7:05 PM   
 By:   John Schuermann   (Member)

Ostinato, with all your intelligent commentary here, it's surprising to me that you would list "Godzilla vs. Hedorah" as your favorite Godzilla film score.

I found it an absolute horror when I first heard it in the early 70s, and my opinion has not changed since. However, I would be interested in hearing your defense of it, as otherwise you are clearly a person of taste smile

BTW, thanks for all the valuable information you've shared here.

 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 7:31 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

Ostinato, with all your intelligent commentary here, it's surprising to me that you would list "Godzilla vs. Hedorah" as your favorite Godzilla film score.

I found it an absolute horror when I first heard it in the early 70s, and my opinion has not changed since. However, I would be interested in hearing your defense of it, as otherwise you are clearly a person of taste smile

BTW, thanks for all the valuable information you've shared here.


I first despised the score when I first saw the film around 2005 or so, but my opinion since came around. I now consider all of the scorn the score gets, and even Manabe himself, unjustifiable. I once written something on why I appreciate the score so much (and why I find all of the scorn unjustifiable), but it's lost to time as far as I know (I'll see if I can find it). One example I can remember is one of Hedorah's themes, first heard in Two Giant Monsters in the Factory District (DB-4 M-13), which sounds if it were taunting Godzilla. I also love how Manabe incorporates what are essentially sound effects into some cues, such as Sulfuric Acid Mist (DB-6 M-20), which I always find genuinely terrifying. Anyway, the score is one of the most unusual and avant-garde I have ever heard, and it adds to the film's rather bleak atmosphere.

And yes, you're very much welcome! I do try my best.

UPDATE: Well I'll be damned! I found what I've written regarding "Hedorah". I'll make some revisions to it.

 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 7:45 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

I guess the lesson to be learned is, all the lucky bastards that have the Futureland CD's better hold onto them.

I sure wish I was one of them.


Haha! Funny that you should mention that, because I've never stopped acquiring the Futureland releases even though I own all six Godzilla boxes. (It also explains the added lengths I had to go to into order to find a copy of Godzilla vs the Mothra (64), which I eventually did at great effort, but surprisingly low price - for a mint copy, OBI included).

 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 7:46 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

And once again, Mr. Ostinato has demonstrated both his vast AND fine knowledge of Japanese film music. A treasure to this board he is.

 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 8:00 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

Haha! Funny that you should mention that, because I've never stopped acquiring the Futureland releases even though I own all six Godzilla boxes. (It also explains the added lengths I had to go to into order to find a copy of Godzilla vs the Mothra (64), which I eventually did at great effort, but surprisingly low price - for a mint copy, OBI included).

LOL! That happens to be one I want to obtain lately! Though I would prefer to find a sealed copy or a copy still in the original shrink wrap.


And once again, Mr. Ostinato has demonstrated both his vast AND fine knowledge of Japanese film music. A treasure to this board he is.

Thanks! You're too kind!

 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2021 - 8:10 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

For those interested, here's what I written on Facebook a few years ago (likely in 2015) regarding Manabe's "Godzilla vs. Hedorah". I don't think this is the final version of what I written (though I did find it on Facebook) as it seems to be missing some details I vaguely remembering it having. If anyone wants to read it, here it is:


I'm going to admit, Riichiro Manabe's score to "Godzilla vs. Hedorah" (1971) is not only my favorite Godzilla score, it's also one of my all-time favorite scores.

Granted, it is unusual, but it is by no means bad. In fact, there are several great cues found in the score. First off is the ominous Opening (DB-1 M-1). Then there is the fantastic tune "Return! The Sun", sung by the incredible Keiko Mari along with Honey Nights. The song appears in several variations throughout the film. Seabed Investigation (DB-1 M-3) is also a great cue being moody and mysterious.

Manabe's heroic Godzilla Theme makes its first appearance at the beginning of The Polluted Sea and Godzilla (DB-2 M-8). The cue then takes an ominous turn, complete with a mouth harp to add to its creepy nature. The cue then concludes with a reprise of the Godzilla Theme. It's also worth noting that a portion of the Godzilla Theme is a reworking of material originally from Manabe's score to the Shochiku film "Night and Fog in Japan" (1960), and later used for his score to "The Militarists" (Toho, 1970). In fact, much of the material heard in the former is used in the latter.

Other noteworthy cues are Proliferation (DB-3 M-9), A Factory That Picks Green (DB-5 M-14), Hedorah's Native Place (DB-5 M-18-2), Sulfuric Acid Mist (DB-6 M-20), Anti-Hedorah Masks Now on Sale (DB-6 M-21), Nuclear Fission (DB-6 M-22), Elucidation of the Weakness (DB-6 M-22A), Transforming Pollution Monster (DB-7 M-23), Guitar in the Wilderness I (PS-103), Godzilla's Struggle (DB-9 M-31), Godzilla Flies (DB-11 M-37-2) and Ending (DB-12 M-40).

Continuing on, Sulfuric Acid Mist (DB-6 M-20), which is a variation of Hedorah's first theme, is quite terrifying, even as a stand-alone experience. It accompanies a scene when people are being dissolved alive from the sulfuric acid mist given off by Hedorah's flying form. The theme that will be mainly used for Hedorah's final form, which is first heard in Two Giant Monsters in the Factory District (DB-4 M-13), is quite taunting, as if Hedorah were mocking Godzilla.

Overall, the score is quite dark, especially the cues accompanying the climax battle on Mount Fuji. The film simply would not have worked at all if it weren't for this score. While it's not heard in the film, I love the song "Defeat Hedorah", composed by Koichi Sugiyama and sung by Keiko Mari. Sugiyama would later go on to compose the score to "Godzilla vs. Biollante" (1989).

 
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