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 Posted:   May 13, 2021 - 11:56 AM   
 By:   Aenae   (Member)

I'm wondering if someone who has this book could share a list of who admired who, apparently there is a section in the book where Bazelon asks which film composers the composer in question admires the most or something like that.

I could be mistaken, but apparently there are 15 composers interviewed in the book who all mention their favourite film composers or who they admire the most in the field.

Elmer Bernstein, Leonard Rosenman, Jerry Goldsmith, John Williams, Richard Rodney Bennett, Alex North, Lalo Schifrin, Bernard Herrmann, David Raksin, Bernardo Segall, Lawrence Rosenthal, Johnny Mandel, Paul Glass, John Barry, Gale Kubik.

If i'm not mistaken Alex North left out John Williams from his favourites list, he did however include Goldsmith, a composer the majority included on their list.

 
 
 Posted:   May 13, 2021 - 12:22 PM   
 By:   TheFamousEccles   (Member)

Here's the list, complete with mention of any scores cited by the composers. If a composer isn't listed, it's because the question either wasn't asked or published in the interview:

Elmer Bernstein: Jerry Goldsmith (Patton)

John Williams: Jerry Goldsmith, Bernard Herrman, [Peter] Maxwell Davies

Alex North: Leonard Rosenman (East of Eden), Jerry Goldsmith, Laurence Rosenthal (Beckett, The Miracle Worker)

David Raksin: Hugo Friedhofer, Bernard Herrmann, Leonard Rosenman, Alex Horth, Laurence Rosenthal, Jerry Goldsmith, Billy Goldenberg

Bernardo Segáll: Jerry Goldsmith (but he also mentions Burt Bacharach & Henry Mancini positively earlier in the interview)

Laurence Rosenthal: Sergei Prokofiev (Alexander Nevsky), William Walton (Henry V), Aaron Copland, Jerry Goldsmith (The Mephisto Waltz)

Johnny Mandel: Jerry Goldsmith, Alex North, Hugo Friedhofer, John Williams, Laurence Rosenthal (The Miracle Worker)

Paul Glass: Aaron Copland (Our Town), Bernard Herrman (The Devil and Daniel Webster), Hugo Friedhofer (The Young Lions, One-Eyed Jacks), David Raksin (Laura)

Gail Kubik: Elmer Bernstein, Henry Mancini, Bernard Herrmann (The Devil and Daniel Webster),

 
 
 Posted:   May 13, 2021 - 12:58 PM   
 By:   Aenae   (Member)

Cool, thank you so much!

 
 
 Posted:   May 13, 2021 - 2:51 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

It was striking how Jerry Goldsmith was almost universally admired. Of course the interviews were conducted in the early 1970s, before John Williams rose to his full eminence. Bazelon was an avant-gardist at heart and was particularly enthusiastic about Williams's IMAGES.

 
 Posted:   May 13, 2021 - 3:10 PM   
 By:   judy the hutt   (Member)

mr bazelon spoke at the university of arizona

said no great music came from film scores. what can i say? he did like jerry goldsmith but frankly i thought he was full of it after his opinion

 
 
 Posted:   May 13, 2021 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

A wonderful book. Great interviews. While Bazelon did have a predilection for the avant-garde, he told Alex North--who could write modern music with the best of them--that what he most admired about North was his lyricism.

 
 
 Posted:   May 13, 2021 - 6:24 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Notice that Prokofiev was the only deceased (and non-English-territory) composer cited.
Walton & Maxwell Davies were the only British ones.

These early '70s interviews appear geared toward (then-)living colleagues ... and mostly from Hollywood.
No Japanese, Italian nor French composers were mentioned.

Most curious to me, though, is the lack of admiration for Golden Age Hollywood.
Yes, Herrmann & Raksin & Friedhofer are present ... but the non-U.S.-born such as Rozsa, Kaper, Waxman, Tiomkin, Steiner, Korngold, etc. are absent.

Perhaps Alfred Newman & Victor Young + others aren't mentioned because they were already deceased prior to the interviews?

Both Previn & Malcolm Arnold were very much alive & active during the '70s but both had shunned the film & TV industry by 1970 - maybe yet another reason for their exclusion from the book's content.

 
 
 Posted:   May 13, 2021 - 7:38 PM   
 By:   TheFamousEccles   (Member)

Notice that Prokofiev was the only deceased (and non-English-territory) composer cited.
Walton & Maxwell Davies were the only British ones.

These early '70s interviews appear geared toward (then-)living colleagues ... and mostly from Hollywood.
No Japanese, Italian nor French composers were mentioned.

Most curious to me, though, is the lack of admiration for Golden Age Hollywood.
Yes, Herrmann & Raksin & Friedhofer are present ... but the non-U.S.-born such as Rozsa, Kaper, Waxman, Tiomkin, Steiner, Korngold, etc. are absent.

Perhaps Alfred Newman & Victor Young + others aren't mentioned because they were already deceased prior to the interviews?

Both Previn & Malcolm Arnold were very much alive & active during the '70s but both had shunned the film & TV industry by 1970 - maybe yet another reason for their exclusion from the book's content.


Malcolm Arnold is mentioned positively by Herrmann as one of "Many distinguished composers writing for film," but it was more connected to a question about "concert composers writing for film" than anything else. Among the others Herrmann listed in his response to that question are "Darius Milhaud, William Walton, [Richard] Rodney Bennett," and "Aaron Copland."

In the Goldsmith interview, Goldsmith says that: "I think the only concert composer who is eminently successful in films is Aaron Copland."

One more I forgot, simply because I was more looking for the specific question about other composers they admire -- John Williams talks about Quincy Jones for a few sentences, calling him "wonderfully gifted", and says that Alfred Newman was "one of the ones who impressed me the most", of the composers he played for.

Regarding your well-observed point about timeframes everyone refers to, Richard Rodney Bennett notes in his interview that "I really think that the greatest progress in film music was made during the 1930s -- not since then," and elaborates: "I think the biggest strides forward in creating a true film music were created in the thirties in Europe."

I'm sure there are more specific citations regarding other composers throughout the interviews that I didn't spot on my cursory lookthrough -- if I do, I'll edit one or the other of these posts.

Off-topic, because it's not in the book, but I know that Leonard Rosenman admired Bernard Herrmann, Jerry Goldsmith and Max Steiner, among a few others.

Have you ever heard any of Bazelon's concert music, ZardozSpeaks? I think it might be right up your alley -- I think it's pretty terrific, myself.

 
 
 Posted:   May 14, 2021 - 9:21 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)


Have you ever heard any of Bazelon's concert music, ZardozSpeaks? I think it might be right up your alley -- I think it's pretty terrific, myself.


Indeed, but I should listen to more than what is in my collection
I own only one Albany CD of Irwin Bazelon symphonies:



(have had this since probably 2003 smile )

 
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