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 Posted:   Sep 1, 2021 - 1:25 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In March 1964, during the production hiatus between the third and fourth seasons of “McHale’s Navy”, Universal shot a feature film version of the show, suitably called McHALE’S NAVY. The film’s plot finds the crew of PT-73 trying to win a horse race in New Caledonia after they find a racehorse on the wreck of an Australian freighter. The story was inspired by a 1907 incident involving a race horse named Mai Faa, presumed lost at sea in a shipwreck until he came ashore on a South Pacific island. Daily Variety identified the equine star of the film as “Red Cloud.”

Actress Jean Willes, who formerly appeared with star Ernest Borgnine in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY (1953), augmented the predominantly male cast. Her character ejected Borgnine from a nitery in both films. The only other female roles went to French singer Claudine Longet in her first screen role, and Sandy Slavik, described as a “young receptionist in Universal’s press department.” Gavin MacLeod reprised his role of “‘Happy’ Haines” from the series, and received his first poster credit.

Gavin MacLeod (center) and the male cast of McHALE’S NAVY



To enhance audience appeal, the feature film was shot in color, whereas the series had its run strictly in black-and-white. The island set used in both the film and the series was located on the Universal Studios back lot in Los Angeles. During production of the film, heavy rains washed away much of foliage planted by greensman Howard Cuff. Because the wet weather also prevented exterior shooting, the set was reconstructed on a soundstage. Days later, the company went on location to Catalina Island, off the Southern California coast.

Edward J. Montagne directed the film, which had an unreleased score by Jerry Fielding. Box office returns were excellent for what was essentially an extended episode of a television series, coming in at $4.3 million.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2021 - 1:07 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

THE SWORD OF ALI BABA was a low budget Universal second feature remake of 1944’s ALI BABA AND THE FORTY THIEVES. As in the original, this film finds two Bagdad children—“Amara,” daughter of Prince Cassim (Frank Puglia), and “Ali,” son of the caliph—pledge marriage. When the Mongol “Hulagu Khan” (Gavin MacLeod) invades Bagdad, the caliph is killed through the treachery of Cassim. But Ali escapes and finds refuge with “Old Baba” (Frank De Kova) and his band of 40 thieves. Fifteen years later, Ali (Peter Mann) falls in love with Amara (Jocelyn Lane) without recognizing her. Then he learns that she is to be married to Hulagu Khan.

Gavin MacLeod, Jocelyn Lane, and Frank Puglia in THE SWORD OF ALI BABA



Virgil Vogel directed the film (his last theatrical feature), which used some action footage from the 1944 original. Frank Skinner provided the unreleased score.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2021 - 9:43 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

After their series wrapped production on its third season in the spring of 1965, the cast of “McHale’s Navy” went into production on a sequel to its first theatrical film. Titled McHALE’S NAVY JOINS THE AIR FORCE, the film was marked by the absence of series star Ernest Borgnine.

Various explanations have been offered for Borgnine’s absence. One says that Borgnine was not asked to be in the film because the producers were trying to hold down the film’s budget. Another says that Borgnine declined to appear over a salary dispute. And a third says that Borgnine had a prior commitment to appear in the film FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX.

Regardless, with Borgnine not in the film, Tim Conway received top billing, and the plot focused on “Ensign Parker” (Conway) and “Captain Binghamton” (Joe Flynn). The story finds Binghamton taking over command of the PT-73 after his boat sinks, and Parker and the crew getting involved with some Russians who want to use the PT-73 to smuggle Australian whiskey. Some uniform mix-ups find Parker in an Air Force uniform and forced to impersonate the pilot son of an Army Air Force general. Gavin MacLeod reprised his role of Seaman “‘Happy’ Haines” in the film.

The film was directed by Edward J. Montagne and had an unreleased score by Jerry Fielding. The picture opened in Providence, Rhode Island on 16 June 1965, and was almost as profitable as its predecessor, grossing $4.1 million. However, the cancellation of the “McHale’s Navy” television series after its fourth season ended any further feature films.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2021 - 1:10 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

After their series wrapped production on its third season in the spring of 1965, the cast of “McHale’s Navy” went into production on a sequel to its first theatrical film. Titled McHALE’S NAVY JOINS THE AIR FORCE, the film was marked by the absence of series star Ernest Borgnine.

Various explanations have been offered for Borgnine’s absence. One says that Borgnine was not asked to be in the film because the producers were trying to hold down the film’s budget. Another says that Borgnine declined to appear over a salary dispute. And a third says that Borgnine had a prior commitment to appear in the film FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX.

Regardless, with Borgnine not in the film, Tim Conway received top billing, and the plot focused on “Ensign Parker” (Conway) and “Captain Binghamton” (Joe Flynn). The story finds Binghamton taking over command of the PT-73 after his boat sinks, and Parker and the crew getting involved with some Russians who want to use the PT-73 to smuggle Australian whiskey. Some uniform mix-ups find Parker in an Air Force uniform and forced to impersonate the pilot son of an Army Air Force general. Gavin MacLeod reprised his role of Seaman “‘Happy’ Haines” in the film.

The film was directed by Edward J. Montagne and had an unreleased score by Jerry Fielding. The picture opened in Providence, Rhode Island on 16 June 1965, and was almost as profitable as its predecessor, grossing $4.1 million. However, the cancellation of the “McHale’s Navy” television series after its fourth season ended any further feature films.



The film's also noteworthy as having two actors who played other roles in the series: Jacques Aubuchon (Chief Urulu) and Henry Beckman (Colonel Douglas Harrington in the series' fourth and final season when Binghampton and the crew of the P.T. 73 were transferred to Voltafiore).

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2021 - 4:41 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In 1966, Leonard Nimoy, along with writer-director Vic Morrow, co-produced the independent film DEATHWATCH. Based on the 1949 French play Haute Surveillance by Jean Genêt, the film focused on three men who share a dank cell in a French prison. Nimoy starred as "Jules LeFranc," a social outcast serving time for a minor theft, who worships "Greeneyes" (Michael Forest) a convicted murderer awaiting the guillotine. Into the mix is thrown "Maurice" (Paul Mazursky), an overt homosexual. Tension ensues. Gavin MacLeod had a small role as prisoner “Emil.” The film was scored by future "Star Trek" composer, Gerald Fried.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 5, 2021 - 1:07 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In 1926, as strong feelings of nationalism are sweeping through China among followers of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, as well as the war lords and communists, the U.S. gunboat San Pablo, helmed by “Captain Collins” (Richard Crenna), patrols the Yangtze River. Among the crew, who call themselves THE SAND PEBBLES, is “Jake Holman” (Steve McQueen), a machinist with 8 years previous Navy duty. Although Jake's independent nature is regarded with suspicion by most of the men, he wins the friendship of “Frenchy Burgoyne” (Richard Attenborough), a sailor in love with a British-educated Chinese girl, “Maily” (Marayat Andriane), who has been sold into forced prostitution. Jake begins a chaste flirtation with idealistic missionary “Shirley Eckert” (Candice Bergen). Gavin MacLeod plays “Crosley,” one of the sailors aboard the San Pablo.

Richard Crenna, Steve McQueen, and Gavin MacLeod in THE SAND PEBBLES



THE SAND PEBBLES was Gavin MacLeod’s second film for director Robert Wise. Although Alex North was originally hired to score the picture, he later had to bow out due to an attack of sciatica, and was replaced by Jerry Goldsmith. Lionel Newman began conducting the score on 20 October 1966. Goldsmith’s score was released on a 20th Century Fox LP. It was first reissued on CD by the “gray market” Tsunami label in 1994. Goldsmith himself conducted portions of the score with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra for a 1997 Varese Sarabande re-recording. In 2002, Varese released an expanded edition of the original soundtrack. Intrada released the complete soundtrack in 2011.

The $12 million production of THE SAND PEBBLES was the #3 film of the year at the 1966 box office, with a $33.8 million gross. Reportedly, Robert Wise was to receive 10% of gross receipts above $30 million.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 6, 2021 - 1:47 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

“Hrundi V. Bakshi” (Peter Sellers), an actor on the New Delhi stage, is brought to Hollywood to play the title role in “Son of Gunga Din.” Bakshi is a bungler, however, and before long he has accidentally blown up the picture's most expensive location set. The enraged studio head, “Fred Clutterbuck” (J. Edward McKinley), vows that the Indian will never work in Hollywood again and writes his name on a slip of paper. Clutterbuck's secretary, however, misinterprets the memo and adds Bakshi's name to the guest list for THE PARTY, a lavish affair that her boss is giving at his home. Gavin MacLeod has a small role as party guest “C.S. Divot.”

Elianne Nadeau, J. Edward McKinley, Danielle De Metz, Gavin MacLeod, and Marge Champion in THE PARTY



Blake Edwards directed this 1968 comedy, his only collaboration with Peter Sellers that was not a PINK PANTHER film. Edwards, Sellers, and principals of Mirisch Corporation had agreed to defer their salaries. Although the film grossed $8.3 million, it earned only $2.9 million in film rentals, a figure equal to its estimated budget.

Henry Mancini’s score was released on an RCA LP, which was re-issued on CD by BMG Japan in 1995, RCA Spain in 1998, BMG Great Britain in 2001, Legacy in the U.S. in 2014, and then back on LP by Quartet in 2018.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2021 - 3:27 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

A MAN CALLED GANNON was a remake of the 1955 Kirk Douglas western MAN WITHOUT A STAR. In the new film, seasoned cowboy “Gannon” (Tony Franciosa) takes young tender-foot “Jess Washburn” (Michael Sarrazin) under his wing. They become embroiled in a range war, and end up on opposite sides. Gavin McLeod had a small part in the film as “Lou.”

James Goldstone directed the 1969 release. Dave Grusin provided the unreleased score. The film had middling box office of $700,000.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2021 - 11:25 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Steeple Bassington, England, 1943. The United States Army Air Force's 8th Air Force, 103rd Heavy Bombardment Group, is mired in moral-lowering night-time bombing missions that are simultaneously dangerous and relatively ineffective against the German war-making machine. Commanding Officer “Colonel Greg Brandon” (Christopher George) has repeatedly made requests to his superior, “General Palmer” (J.D. Cannon), for consideration of an ambitious bombing plan: THE 1000 PLANE RAID over Germany...in broad daylight. Now, Supreme Allied Command is ready to listen, and Brandon must make his case?particularly to disapproving “General Conway” (Barry Atwater)?for such a risky plan, a plan that could render the Army Air Force powerless should losses exceed Brandon's predictions. Brandon gets the nod, and he begins to re-build the sloppy 103rd , trying to weed out the incompetents and cowards like “Lieutenant Archer” (Ben Murphy), while pushing too hard against the rest, like “Lieutenants Quimby and Jacoby” (Tim McIntire and Noam Pitlik), “Captain Douglass” (Bo Hopkins), and mechanic “Sergeant Kruger” (Gavin MacLeod).

Boris Sagal directed the 1969 production. Jimmie Haskell provided the unreleased score. The film grossed a low $900,000.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2021 - 4:51 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In April 1968, actor-filmmaker Carl Reiner and his writing partner, Aaron Ruben, completed the first draft of a screenplay whose working title was “Billy Bright, Silent Film Comedian, Dead at 78.” Reiner said that he intended this as a vehicle for Dick Van Dyke who had, on the set of their TV show, often expressed the wish that he had been working at the same time as comedy legends such as his hero Stan Laurel.

In September 1968, Columbia Pictures initiated the production, with Reiner directing Van Dyke as “Billy Bright” in what was now titled “Baggy Pants.” Also in the cast were Michele Lee as Billy’s wife “Mary Gibson,” Mickey Rooney as fellow comic “Cockeye,” and Gavin Macleod in a small role as the “1st director.”

In January 1969, Reiner was in the process of editing the film. Columbia was reportedly pleased with Reiner’s work, and was in negotiations for a new production deal with the filmmaker.

In late February 1969, Michele Lee was summoned to the Columbia lot for an additional scene, three months after the completion of principal photography. The pregnant actress anticipated mostly close-up shots. Van Dyke was also called back to add voice-over narration. While vacationing in Arizona, Van Dyke recorded his voice-over at the radio station he owned in nearby Phoenix. On 29 April 1969, Daily Variety announced that the title was changed to THE COMIC.

THE COMIC opened 19 September 1969 in New York City. While Daily Variety argued that the picture would appeal only to members of the entertainment industry, the Los Angeles Times declared it a work of art, adding that Van Dyke’s performance could have won him an Academy Award if Columbia had provided sufficient publicity to accompany the release.

Four weeks later, Reiner complained to the 3 December 1969 Variety that the film was not adequately publicized. After being “rushed” into New York City and Los Angeles openings as part of a double feature with THE DESPERADOS, it was relegated to second billing within the first two weeks. By the time the picture began garnering positive reviews and “word-of-mouth,” it was virtually out of circulation. Regardless of whose fault it was, THE COMIC was near the median of 1969 releases when it came to earnings, grossing $2.1 million. Jack Elliott’s score for the film has not had a release.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2021 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In 1970, Gavin MacLeod had one of his best-known film roles in the Clint Eastwood World War II adventure KELLY’S HEROES. “Kelly” (Eastwood) and “Big Joe” (Telly Savalas) are planning the robbery of 14,000 gold ingots worth $16 million being held in a nearby German bank. MacLeod played “Moriarity,” the complaining crewman who comes along with “Oddball” (Donald Sutherland), an eccentric young soldier who has stolen two Sherman tanks.

Gavin MacLeod in KELLY’S HEROES



Brian G. Hutton directed. Lalo Schifrin’s score was released on an MGM LP, which was re-issued on CD by Chapter III in 2001. The score was expanded for a 2005 CD release by Film Score Monthly. The $7.4 million production was the #21 film at the 1970 box office, with a $16.2 million gross.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2021 - 12:46 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Originally, “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” was to be about a divorced woman. But divorce was still a somewhat taboo television subject in 1970, and CBS was also afraid people would think that Mary Tyler Moore had divorced “Rob Petrie,” her character's husband on “The Dick Van Dyke Show.” So, Moore’s character, “Mary Richards,” was changed to a woman with a broken engagement.

Gavin MacLeod co-starred as “Murray Slaughter,” head writer in the newsroom of WJM-TV's Six O'Clock News. Murray makes frequent quips about how “Ted Baxter” (Ted Knight) mangles his news copy, and about “Sue Ann Nivens'” (Betty White’s) aggressive, man-hungry attitude. He is Mary's closest coworker and close friend. Murray is married to the occasionally seen “Marie” (Joyce Bulifant), and has several children.

Although a happy family man, Murray is forever in love with Mary Richards, who is, in his words, "Absolutely terrific." He is protective of her and always concerned for her happiness and well-being. At one point, when Murray truly believes he is in love with Mary in a real way, Marie thinks he is going to leave the family. Mary explains to Marie that she thinks of Murray as a best friend, which helps things settle down.

Mary Tyler Moore and Gavin MacLeod in “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”



Gavin MacLeod and Cloris Leachman (who played “Phyllis Lindstrom”) were not close in real life, much like their characters. They had worked together before and had a very bad experience, and Leachman was actually uncomfortable with MacLeod for the first couple of seasons, and didn't want to be near him on the set. Eventually they grew to be friends, though.

It was just the opposite with Ted Knight. MacLeod and Knight had been friends long before they starting working on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” together. MacLeod had purchased his first house, right at the same time Ted Knight purchased his, in the same area.

Gavin MacLeod



MacLeod was a regular during the entire run of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” (168 episodes) from 1970 to 1977 (Seasons 1 to 7). Murray and Mary are the only characters to appear in every episode of the series. Although other cast members are glimpsed during the show’s opening credits, Mary Tyler Moore was the only cast member named in the opening. All other cast members were named in the end credits. The credits below are from the final season, after Valerie Harper (“Rhoda Morgenstern”) had left the show at the end of Season 4, and Cloris Leachman had left at the end of Season 5. (There is a shot of Moore and Harper feeding ducks on the bank of a pond in a Minneapolis park. This shot remained in the credits, even after Harper left the show.)




Gavin MacLeod was nominated for a Golden Globe Award as Best Supporting Actor – Television in 1975 and 1977. He lost the 1975 award to Harvey Korman for “The Carol Burnett Show” and the 1977 award to Ed Asner for RICH MAN, POOR MAN.

Speaking of his character of Murray on the show, MacLeod remarked that “It was tough for [Murray] in that newsroom with Ted Baxter getting all the glory, and this poor guy doing all the work. Murray worried so much he worried his hair off!”

When Mary Tyler Moore died, Gavin MacLeod was unable to attend her funeral because it was limited to family only. In remembering Moore, Gavin noted that “A line from our theme song was 'Love is all around', and that's what it was for 5 days a week for seven years straight on the Mary Tyler Moore set. It was all because of Mary! She was professional; she was extremely creative with a terrific sense of humor and a gifted actress. She set a pace for all of us to follow. So I consider those seven years working with this very special person as a gift from God.

“It goes without saying what a wonderful loving and caring person she was to everyone who worked on the show. Mary was America's sweetheart and she was mine also. I was the luckiest guy in the world just sitting next to her and looking at her beautiful face...and legs! One of my favorite shows was when Murray turned 40 years old and woke up thinking he was in love with Mary. Today, 'sadness is all around' for all of us and I will miss Mary...deeply.”

The cast of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” (Seasons 6 & 7)
Top: Ed Asner, Gavin MacLeod, Ted Knight
Middle: Mary Tyler Moore, Georgia Engel
Bottom: Betty White


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2021 - 1:22 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Following the end of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” in the Spring of 1977, Gavin MacLeod moved directly into a new show, and into his greatest television success with the debut of “The Love Boat” in the Fall of 1977. The series was set on the luxury passenger cruise ship MS Pacific Princess, and revolved around the ship's captain “Merrill Stubing” (played by MacLeod) and a handful of its crew, with passengers played by guest actors for each episode, having romantic and humorous adventures. The ship's regular ports of call were Puerto Vallarta, Acapulco, and Mazatlán.

The series had been preceded by three made-for-television movies. The first, in 1976, had the ship captained by “Thomas Ford” (Ted Hamilton) and had none of the series regulars. The second film, broadcast on 21 January 1977 did not have a captain character, but introduced series regulars Fred Grandy, Bernie Kopell, and Ted Lange. The final film, shown on 5 May 1977 was the one that brought Gavin MacLeod on board.




Every episode of the subsequent series contained several storylines, each written by a different set of writers working on one group of guest stars. Thus, episodes have multiple titles referencing their simultaneous storylines, e.g., the first episode of season one is "Captain & the Lady / Centerfold / One If by Land".

“The Love Boat” crew (clockwise, from front center): Gavin MacLeod, Fred Grandy, Ted Lange, Bernie Kopell, and Lauren Tewes



There were typically three storylines. One usually focused on a member of the crew, a second would often focus on a crew member interacting with a passenger, and the third storyline was more focused on a single passenger (or a group of passengers). The three storylines usually followed a similar thematic pattern: One storyline (typically the "crew" one) was straight-ahead comedy. The second would typically follow more of a romantic comedy format (with only occasional dramatic elements). The third storyline would usually be the most dramatic of the three, often offering few (if any) laughs and a far more serious tone.

Gavin MacLeod in “The Love Boat”



“The Love Boat” theme song was sung by Jack Jones (except for the last season, where a cover version by Dionne Warwick was used). The lyrics were written by Paul Williams with music by Charles Fox. The song has also been recorded and released commercially, by Charo in 1978 and Amanda Lear in 2001.




ABC premiered the series on Saturday, 24 September 1977, at 10 PM. The show went up against “The Carol Burnett Show,” then in its final season, and “NBC Saturday Night at the Movies.” “The Love Boat” finished as the 14th-highest-rated show of the season.

In its second season (1978-79), ABC moved “The Love Boat” ahead into the 9PM slot on Saturdays, where it acted as a lead-in for “Fantasy Island.” “The Love Boat” faced weak sit-com competition on the other networks and came in as #17 for the season. Gavin MacLeod received a Golden Globe nomination as “Best Actor in a Television Series - Comedy or Musical.” He lost the award to Robin Williams for “Mork & Mindy”

Gavin MacLeod and Lauren Tewes in “The Love Boat”



During Season 3 (1979-80), the show faced the failed detective drama “Big Shamus, Little Shamus” on CBS and “B.J. and the Bear” on NBC. “The Love Boat” was the #23 series for the season. Season 4 (1980-81) saw “The Love Boat” hit its peak in the ratings, in the #5 position, as it faced movies of varying quality on CBS and NBC. Gavin MacLeod received a Golden Globe nomination as “Best Actor in a Television Series - Comedy or Musical.” He lost the award to Alan Alda for “M*A*S*H”.

Special two-hour episode, 15 November 1980



In Season 5 (1981-82), “The Love Boat” dropped back into the #14 position for the year, going against movies on CBS and five different shows on NBC, which included “Nashville Palace” and “Barbara Mandrell and the Mandrell Sisters.” Gavin MacLeod received a Golden Globe nomination as “Best Actor in a Television Series - Comedy or Musical.” He again lost the award to Alan Alda for “M*A*S*H”.

MacLeod noted that “What I enjoyed most about ‘The Love Boat’ was interacting with the variety of guest stars we had on the show each week. The producers did a fantastic job of appealing to a wide audience range by combining legendary stars like Lana Turner, Cesar Romero and Ethel Merman, with current celebrities of the day like Andy Warhol, Melissa Gilbert and Michael J. Fox, as well as future stars Vanessa Williams and Kirstie Alley in each episode.”

Season 6 (1982-83) saw “The Love Boat” rebound to #9 in the ratings, facing movies on CBS and 5 sit-coms on NBC which filled the hour in various combinations, including “Love, Sidney” and “Mama’s Family.” In its seventh season (1983-84), “The Love Boat” dropped back to #17, facing movies on CBS and the series “Airwolf” on NBC.

Gavin MacLeod in “The Love Boat”



In Season 8 (1984-85), CBS finally gave up on its Saturday movies and placed “Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer” into the 9 PM slot against “The Love Boat,” while NBC went with a new (and failed) series “Partners In Crime.” “The Love Boat” fell out of the top 30 shows for the first time.

Fred Grandy, Gavin MacLeod, Lauren Tewes, and Bernie Kopell in “The Love Boat”



Season 9 (1985-86) saw ABC moving “The Love Boat” back to the 10PM slot on Saturday, replacing “Finder of Lost Loves,” the cancelled series that had replaced the cancelled “Fantasy Island” the prior year. CBS went back to programming movies on Saturday nights, while NBC put the crime drama “Hunter” up against “The Love Boat.” The ratings for “The Love Boat” did not improve, and the series was cancelled after 9 seasons and 250 episodes. Gavin MacLeod, Bernie Kopell (ship's doctor “Adam ‘Doc’ Bricker”) and Ted Lange (bartender “Isaac Washington”) were the only cast members to appear in every episode of the series.

Looking back at his run in the series, MacLeod said that the show “was bringing a lot of joy to people. Letting them know they had choices so they could have happy endings. We travelled all over the world first class, and we had great wonderful fun scripts to work with. It was really a great gig.”

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2021 - 11:16 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

MURDER CAN HURT YOU! was a made-for-TV spoof of detective shows meant as a riff on 1976's MURDER BY DEATH, with an all-star cast of comic actors playing knock-offs of famous television detectives of the 1970s. The cast included Tony Danza (as the Baretta-ish “Pony Lambretta”), Jamie Farr & John Byner (as “Studsky and Hatch”), Gavin MacLeod (as “Nojack), Connie Stevens (as Pepper Anderson analog “Salty Sanderson”), Buck Owens (as “MacSkye”), Victor Buono and Jimmie Walker (as “Ironbottom” and “Parks the Pusher”), and Burt Young as “Lt. Palumbo.” In the film, someone is murdering all the great detectives and cops, and it's up to the remaining few to find the killer and stop him.

In one gag, while trapped on a balloon, John Byner, who plays “Len 'Hatch' Hatchington,” looks down and sees a cruise ship. The ship is “The Love Boat” from that TV series, on which Byner made several guest appearances and also on which Gavin Macleod, who plays Lt. Nojack, played “Captain Merril Stubing.” (Aaron Spelling Productions produced both that series and this movie.)

Among the supporting cast (and not making the cut in the ad below) was Marty Allen as "Det. Starkos," the doppelganger of Kojak's underling "Det. Stavros" (played in the series by Telly Savalas' brother George Savalas). Roger Duchowny directed the comedy, which aired on ABC on 21 May 1980. Artie Kane scored the film.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In THE SECRETS OF JONATHAN SPERRY, Gavin MacLeod played the title character, a wise old Christian man who imparts Biblical truths to three boys during the summer of 1970. MacLeod remarked, “I've worked with some of the biggest names in Hollywood: Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Gregory Peck, Mary Tyler Moore. But the biggest honor I have ever had was to play the role of Jonathan Sperry in this simple but special film.”

Gavin MacLeod in THE SECRETS OF JONATHAN SPERRY



Rich Christiano directed and co-wrote the 2008 film with his brother Dave. Jasper Randall provided the unreleased score. The film grossed $1.4 million in the U.S.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 9:52 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

THE SECRETS OF JONATHAN SPERRY was Gavin MacLeod’s final feature film role. He made a few more television guest shots before retiring in 2014. In looking back at his career, MacLeod noted that “I never looked for my own show. I just wanted to work as an actor. Some of the things I was offered I would carry as the star. But the premises were so negative. One reason I love “The Love Boat” is because of the happy endings. I don't care if it reflects life or not, I love happy endings. Life's so heavy these days that people want to escape.”

Whether top-billed or as part of an ensemble, Gavin MacLeod’s 16 straight years (1970-86) as a fixture in the nation’s living rooms is an enviable accomplishment. Farewell, Gavin.

in “Mr. Lucky” (1959)



in “Cain’s Hundred” (1961)



with Don Knotts in “The Andy Griffith Show”



in “Rawhide” (1965)



in “Hogan’s Heroes” (1968)



with Mary Tyler Moore



with Pat Crowley and Jill Whelan



with Patty Duke




 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2021 - 1:36 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

There was also his role in the second season two part episode of "The Untouchables" entitled "The Big Train" which was edited and released theatrically as "Alcatraz Express".

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2021 - 1:38 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

MURDER CAN HURT YOU! was a made-for-TV spoof of detective shows meant as a riff on 1976's MURDER BY DEATH, with an all-star cast of comic actors playing knock-offs of famous television detectives of the 1970s. The cast included Tony Danza (as the Baretta-ish “Pony Lambretta”), Jamie Farr & John Byner (as “Studsky and Hatch”), Gavin MacLeod (as “Nojack), Connie Stevens (as Pepper Anderson analog “Salty Sanderson”), Buck Owens (as “MacSkye”), Victor Buono and Jimmie Walker (as “Ironbottom” and “Parks the Pusher”), and Burt Young as “Lt. Palumbo.” In the film, someone is murdering all the great detectives and cops, and it's up to the remaining few to find the killer and stop him.

In one gag, while trapped on a balloon, John Byner, who plays “Len 'Hatch' Hatchington,” looks down and sees a cruise ship. The ship is “The Love Boat” from that TV series, on which Byner made several guest appearances and also on which Gavin Macleod, who plays Lt. Nojack, played “Captain Merril Stubing.” (Aaron Spelling Productions produced both that series and this movie.)

Among the supporting cast (and not making the cut in the ad below) was Marty Allen as "Det. Starkos," the doppelganger of Kojak's underling "Det. Stavros" (played in the series by Telly Savalas' brother George Savalas). Roger Duchowny directed the comedy, which aired on ABC on 21 May 1980. Artie Kane scored the film.



In that ad Gavin MacLeod looks like somebody put epoxy on his lollipop and he can't get it off his tongue!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2021 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In that ad Gavin MacLeod looks like somebody put epoxy on his lollipop and he can't get it off his tongue!


Part of the comedy, no doubt. Telly Savalas sucked on Tootsie Roll Pops, which are small and round, unlike that large flat paddle that MacLeod is attached to.

 
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