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 Posted:   Jul 23, 2021 - 10:33 AM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

George Antheil, Cecil B. DeMille & Boris Morros – Union Pacific (1939)

George Antheil (1900-1959) composed at Paramount Studios three scores for director-producer Cecil B. DeMille:

- The Plainsman (1936)
- The Buccaneer (1938)
- Union Pacific (1939) - Rejected

Antheil's Main titles & intro from "The Buccaneer"



0:00 Main Titles
1:34 Intro
2:11 The President’s Palace (Excerpt)



In those days, the head of the music department at Paramount’s was Boris Morros (1891-1963), composer, conductor, aspiring film producer and Soviet agent - later turned double agent. Morros lost his job at Paramount after the score for John Ford’s “The Stagecoach” was considered inappropriate. A committee of studio composers wrote the replacement score.
Morros apparently tried to modernize the way films should be scored and hired new people from the outside of the usual film music composer’s group associated with Paramount. He also fired parts from the composer’s staff. Under such circumstances George Antheil got his gigs thanks to Morros.
When Antheil started to present his music for “Union Pacific” Morros was no longer there to shield him from possible attacks by envious and/or narrow minded competitors at Paramount’s music department.
To make a long story short. Antheil’s efforts for “Union Pacific” were tossed by DeMille. A committee of Paramount composers delivered the replacement score.
Antheil reworks pieces of his “Union Pacific” score into the third movement of his 3rd symphony, “Symphony No. 3 "American": III. The Golden Spike. Andante – Allegro scherzando”.


The premiere recording of the 3rd movement “The Golden Spike” (2004):
Radio-Sinfonie-Orchester Frankfurt
Hugh Wolff, conductor




The second recording of “The Golden Spike” movement (2019):
BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
John Storgårds, conductor
Yuri Torchinsky, leader




Excerpt from the Chandos liner notes by Mervyn Cooke (CH10982, p. 9):

The only part of the Third Symphony which
was performed during Antheil’s lifetime was
the third movement, ‘The Golden Spike’,
which was aired by the National Symphony
Orchestra of Washington, D.C., under Hans
Kindler on 28 November 1945. The movement’s
title is a reference to the legendary piece of
precious metal which symbolically completed
the tracks laid down as the First Continental
Railroad in the USA in 1869. For the music
in this movement Antheil drew from his
abandoned score to the movie Union Pacific
(1939), the third film on which he was due
to work with the director Cecil B. De Mille at
Paramount. This project proved to be a sad
turning point in Antheil’s film-scoring career, as
the formerly supportive director – increasingly
worried about public opinion – enlisted almost
everyone in the studio’s music department to
voice their collective disapproval of Antheil’s
style when Antheil demonstrated his musical
sketches to them. The film was in the event
scored by others.


The “Union Pacific” story has already been told by Antheil himself in his 1945 autobiography “Bad Boy of Music” (various reprints) as well as by Gergley Hubai (Torn music, rejected film scores, a selected history: 2012: 6-8).

The Boris Morros story has been filmed in 1960. Morros was in Dallas to promote the film "Man On a String" starring Ernest Borgnine which was based on his book "My Ten Years As a Counterspy" – you’ll find “Man on a string” on YT. Here is Austin Schneider’s interview with Boris Morros (April 1960) (interview & sound starts at 0:40):




Here is a video in Spanish about Morros for those who speak the language:




Read more about Morros’ story as US-Soviet agent in the book “Hollywood Double Agent: The True Tale of Boris Morros” (Jonathan Gill: 2020: Hollywood Double Agent: The True Tale of Boris Morros, Film Producer Turned Cold War Spy: Abrams Press.).

Here is an excerpt online:
https://crimereads.com/the-hollywood-golden-age-producer-turned-cold-war-spy/



=================

See also these George Antheil topics:

BALLET MECANIQUE (1924) - Score & Concert Music
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144905

ANGELS OVER BROADWAY (aka BEFORE I DIE) (1940)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144770

THAT BRENNAN GIRL aka TOUGH GIRL (1946/1951) - also presenting some clips from other Antheil scores
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144512

SPECTER OF THE ROSE (1946)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144602

WE WERE STRANGERS (1949)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144944

HOUSE BY THE RIVER (1950)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144679

THE SNIPER (1952)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=145107

THE JUGGLER (1953)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144559

JESSIE JAMES' WOMEN (1954) - Film Song “CARELESS LOVER” performed by Lita Baron
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144708

HUNTERS OF THE DEEP (1954)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=145484

NOT AS A STRANGER (1955)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144803

THE PRIDE AND THE PASSION (1957) – 2009 discussion concerning a possible rerecording
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=59888

THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (1957-1966) – 20TH CENTURY WITH MIKE WALLACE (1994-2005)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=145267

Jerome Moross on George Antheil (1979 Interview) – ONCE IN A BLUE MOON (1935)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=145177

 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2021 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

After DeMille's definitive rejection of Antheil's various attempts to please the director - and maybe even Paramount's 'composer committee' present in the background during the demo sessions - with the music he had composed for "Union Pacific" there was obviously one particular composer who somehow managed to get all the DeMille scoring gigs afterwards (with one well known exception only): Victor Young.

I wonder if Victor Young had anything to do with the fact, that Antheil's music was tossed?

Could it be that Young sat in that sounding board and was one of the detractors of Antheil's efforts?

Who knows?

Young didn't compose the replacement score, although some uncredited stock music of his was apparently used in "Union Pacific". But for the next DeMille film, Young was in, and with the exception of “The Ten Commandments” he would score every DeMille film afterwards.

 
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