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 Posted:   Sep 8, 2021 - 6:58 PM   
 By:   Phil567   (Member)

Who got into laserdiscs, then eventually found they had an obsolete collection? I never had a player and only ever bought a couple of laserdiscs which I watched on a friend's player. I still have them and think, what a scam! I may as well use them as frisbees now. That friend of mine had a laserdisc player and tons of laserdiscs. I don't think he has the player or the laserdiscs anymore.

Now for my next question: are there still at this late date rare movies that are only available on laserdisc, so that the laserdisc of the movie is a prized possession?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2021 - 7:23 PM   
 By:   Tango Urilla   (Member)

I'm not sure about whole movies, but as far as something that can only be found on laserdisc and surely will never be reproduced (officially) on any other medium: in 1991 Criterion released laserdiscs of the first three James Bond films with now banned commentaries.

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2021 - 7:26 PM   
 By:   Octoberdog   (Member)

I bought "Fantasia" upon release, without having had a player.
I sort of assumed I would catch up with getting a player and, in the meantime, grab whatever films came out in the fear that if I didn't snap them up then they would soon go OOP.

As it turns out I never did get a player.
DVD was just around the corner, relatively speaking, and I went absolutely mental on that format.
So "Fantasia" sits up there, alone--a lovely artifact that fulfills its purpose just by being there. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2021 - 7:34 PM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

I have the massive Fantasia set, and Lawrence of Arabia, and 2001 and Bladerunner and a big Alien box, beautiful things, and I cannot give them up

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2021 - 8:01 PM   
 By:   King Solium   (Member)

I didn't have the income to dive into Laser Discs when they hit the market. Was bummed out about it at the time but I guess I saved myself a ton of money! I never bought a lot of DVD's either because I knew Blu Ray was just four or so years down the road. I wasn't going to spend thousands on DVD's just to re-buy my whole collection in HD. I only purchased the essentials.

Back to Laser Discs, it's the last time we got the original theatrical soundtrack for "An American Tail" before they butchered the crap out of it for DVD, Blu Ray and Streaming releases. Ive been meaning to buy the laser disc version if its still available and see if I can sinc it up with the Blu Ray.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2021 - 8:04 PM   
 By:   Nightingale   (Member)

Beta/VHS/Laser Discs/DVD...I've done them all. $$$$$$$$$$$$$


You can have my player (I think it still works) if you come get it.

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2021 - 10:17 PM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

To be perfectly humble, I was a LaserDisc god.

The Godfather: The Complete Epic was a top-ten all-timer. Se7en and Close Encounters of the Third Kind from The Criterion Collection were also highlights.

Oliver Stone's major movies, Born on the Fourth of July, The Doors, and JFK were all prime titles for sound and picture.

Platoon, in its Pioneer Special Edition release, with cloth-bound, hinged, screenplay-with-photos sleeve, might have been the format's zenith.

 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2021 - 2:48 AM   
 By:   Adam.   (Member)

I had my Pioneer player and about 60 movies on Laser from 1987 to 1999. 12 years and I enjoyed the hell out of them. I learned early on that some discs were poor quality. No better than VHS on some titles. But through the nineties Laser was state-of-the-art. I don't regret buying them for a second.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2021 - 5:21 AM   
 By:   andy b   (Member)

I had well over 2000 films on disc, but to be fair, working in the industry at the time, I got an awful lot at no charge.

I thought they were terrific & certainly an upgrade from the tape days, the box sets where incredibly expensive, but majority were well worth the costs. The best one for me was Close Encounters of the Third Kind, where the option to play the entire film a combination of the cinema cut & Special Edition was very interesting. As mentioned above a large number of extras have never made it to DVD or Blu Ray, commentaries, trailers & features. Along with actual cinema unaltered versions, example Where Eagles Dare had the intermission card & music play out & back into the film.

The flipping over for the film & then the deadly “rot” did not help their sales or public acceptance & I do like Blu Ray & DVD so much more. Progress?

Regards
Andy b

 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2021 - 10:09 AM   
 By:   msmith   (Member)

I still have many and also still play them. I almost never replaced any of them with DVD's, etc.
Especially since laserdiscs were nicely letterboxed before VHS started such a practice.
I'm still not sure of replacing my letterboxed version of "JAWS" though. The back cover of the disc states, "SOME MUSIC HAS BEEN RESCORED". I wonder why some of the music was changed and if these changes also applies to DVD's, etc.
I'm still keeping my laser of Brian De Palmas special edition of "OBESSION". This has Bernard Herrman's score as heard in the theatres slightly changed for dvd and Blu Ray.
I'm also keeping my laser of John Carpenters Criterion version of "HALLOWEEN" since it has the original and much better score before he added the synth overlays to all the DVD's and Blu Rays.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2021 - 10:19 AM   
 By:   tiomkinfan   (Member)

Among the "Laser Disc only" titles was the original roadshow version of the Alamo, taken from a pristine Todd-AO print. The print was returned to M-G-M/U.A. where it was callously stored until it was not suitable for a Blu ray release.

How I wish I had kept my laser disc. Sigh.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 2:46 AM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)

I produced special edition laserdiscs for Pioneer.
a relatively small but super devoted market.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 3:03 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

LaserDiscs barely got on the market before they disappeared, at least that's how I experienced it. I remember marvelling at them in media stores in the 90s (not only the tech -- like big shiny CDs that looked like LPs -- but also the insane prices), but I never got one, or could even afford one when they were around.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 7:18 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

I still have many. The special editions were generally scholarly, more so than many DVD extras. The sound was also uncompressed, originally belter than most DVDS. However the image, while excellent, is analog. Image completely digital uncompressed content on one of those big 12 inch platters! My Pioneer player needs to be replaced. I hope I can find a working model.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 7:22 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

I produced special edition laserdiscs for Pioneer.
a relatively small but super devoted market.


your 1776 laser was really special. Too bad you could not include an expanded soundtrack CD.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 7:25 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

Among the "Laser Disc only" titles was the original roadshow version of the Alamo, taken from a pristine Todd-AO print. The print was returned to M-G-M/U.A. where it was callously stored until it was not suitable for a Blu ray release.

How I wish I had kept my laser disc. Sigh.


The HAWAII roadshow version was also treated poorly. At least Twilight time was able to include a low grade video version on the Blu-ray. I recently obtained a VHS of the full ALAMO to have as a reference copy.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 7:30 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

I had well over 2000 films on disc, but to be fair, working in the industry at the time, I got an awful lot at no charge.

I thought they were terrific & certainly an upgrade from the tape days, the box sets where incredibly expensive, but majority were well worth the costs. The best one for me was Close Encounters of the Third Kind, where the option to play the entire film a combination of the cinema cut & Special Edition was very interesting. As mentioned above a large number of extras have never made it to DVD or Blu Ray, commentaries, trailers & features. Along with actual cinema unaltered versions, example Where Eagles Dare had the intermission card & music play out & back into the film.

The flipping over for the film & then the deadly “rot” did not help their sales or public acceptance & I do like Blu Ray & DVD so much more. Progress?

Regards
Andy b


The GUYS AND DOLLS laser had playout exit music which has never appeared on any DVD or Blu-ray. Also SWEET CHARITY roadshow has only been presented intact on laser. 2 of many examples where the laser was superior.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 8:56 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The GUYS AND DOLLS laser had playout exit music which has never appeared on any DVD or Blu-ray. Also SWEET CHARITY roadshow has only been presented intact on laser. 2 of many examples where the laser was superior.


The laserdisc of WHERE EAGLES DARE has an Intermission and Entr'Acte that have not appeared on any DVD or Blu-ray release. I believe that these only appeared on some overseas prints of the film, in countries where it was a roadshow attraction.

There are also a number of cases where laserdiscs have had stereo soundtracks that have been dropped on subsequent DVD and Blu-ray releases. TARAS BULBA and HELL IN THE PACIFIC come immediately to mind.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 9:59 AM   
 By:   roadshowfan   (Member)

One of the things that excited me the most about laserdiscs was the superb sound quality, especially for stereo films; so much deeper and "widescreen" than the old VHS versions (and in some cases the later DVDs).

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2021 - 10:06 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Some good things came from LaserDiscs, though, despite their shortlived fame. The extra materials. I remember when I got my 1941 DVD, it was a double-sided affair that included all of the material from the LD. Weird to have a double-sided DVD, but glad to have the elaborate extras. I eventually gave away my 1941 DVD to a flea market because I got the Spielberg Blu-ray box.

 
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