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 Posted:   Sep 14, 2021 - 9:30 AM   
 By:   Dylan   (Member)

It's a series and not a feature film (though I feel there are more people watching episodic television than feature films these days), but I understand the "Stranger Things" soundtrack sold really well in 2018. That might be the last one (not counting soundtracks dominated by songs)? I certainly can't recall another instrumental soundtrack since that has received nearly as much notice in the mainstream.

On the subject of the history of best-selling score soundtracks, a few very popular titles that nobody has mentioned yet include "A Man and a Woman" (Francis Lai), "Love Story" (Francis Lai), and "Out of Africa" (John Barry).

 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2021 - 10:45 AM   
 By:   jkruppa   (Member)

James Horner actually gave a precise description of why orchestral scores changed - and I believe that is the reason why contemporary scores rarely appeal to a mass audience so much that they want to buy a score these days.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qrcuw9D92_s&t=637s


Thanks, that's a really enlightening interview. I particularly note how he mentions the prevalence of pulse-driven soundtracks intended to drive a film forward, even back in 2010. That's obviously still the trend now for action-based movies.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2021 - 10:55 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

On the subject of the history of best-selling score soundtracks, a few very popular titles that nobody has mentioned yet include "A Man and a Woman" (Francis Lai), "Love Story" (Francis Lai), and "Out of Africa" (John Barry).

I guess because the topic is about 'last' or 'latest'. Those are all old.

 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2021 - 12:09 PM   
 By:   Stefan Huber   (Member)


On the subject of the history of best-selling score soundtracks, a few very popular titles that nobody has mentioned yet include "A Man and a Woman" (Francis Lai), "Love Story" (Francis Lai), and "Out of Africa" (John Barry).


I'm afraid "A Man and a Woman" (regrettably) does not play in the same category as the other two since it has been OOP for most of the CD era - whereas "Love Story" and "Out of Africa" could be found in even the tiniest record shops. I'd add "Dr. Zhivago" to that list.

"Titanic" may without any doubt be the best-selling soundtrack album, but I think the majority of the people didn't buy it for the score - many of them will not even have bothered to listen to the whole thing. The same goes for "Ghost." Even back in the LP days many people bought the album just for the title song, but there was a strong competition by 45s whereas CD singles were not as popular.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2021 - 5:47 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Does it really matter WHY some people bought it, though?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2021 - 6:20 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

Indeed.
Maybe Horner - and film music in general - gained lots more fans BECAUSE they played beyond the song and found that they liked the orchestral/synth scoring as well, if not even more?

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2021 - 6:48 AM   
 By:   King Solium   (Member)

Indeed.
Maybe Horner - and film music in general - gained lots more fans BECAUSE they played beyond the song and found that they liked the orchestral/synth scoring as well, if not even more?


If one is asking for cold facts, just numbers then the reason for the sales doesn't matter. If one is asking what were the bestselling orchestral scores (then or now) than one would surmise they're asking what were the most popular orchestral scores. But if a gazzilons copies were sold largely for the single pop song on the album (Ghost and Titanic) then its not a good barometer to evaluate most popular orchestral scores.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2021 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

But when the song is tied to the film and also written by the composer (like Barry's BORN FREE, as opposed to GHOST, with the old Alex North song tacked on), it's still the work of our composer guy dude!

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2021 - 7:29 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

But when the song is tied to the film and also written by the composer (like Barry's BORN FREE, as opposed to GHOST, with the old Alex North song tacked on), it's still the work of our composer guy dude!

That's not correct about "Ghost" at all. Number one: It's Alex North and lyrics by Hy Zaret. Two: the song as heard twice in "Unchained" is not tacked on, instead the Righteous Brothers arrangement is. And three it is tied to the film; the infamous love scene with pottery before he dies, famously plays the arrangement, and then later in the film Jarre's instrumental string-heavy arrangement (to harken back to said scene) is heard when she gets to see him one more time in the light of Heaven. And yes, not written by Jarre, but that orchestral arrangement was his doing.

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2021 - 7:32 AM   
 By:   King Solium   (Member)

Even if you adapt the song for the orchestra, the song is the draw not the original score for the film.

 
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