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 Posted:   Oct 12, 2021 - 10:28 AM   
 By:   kingtolkien   (Member)

I am a bit sceptical whether there are film scores written these days that can get someone to start listening and collecting film scores in general from the past up to now.
In the 30's and 40's there were the Errol Flynn blockbuster films with scores by Korngold and Steiner, Thief of bagdad...
In the 50's there was Rozsa with Ivanhoe and Ben Hur, We also had Herrmann with the Hitchcock films. The 60's could get you started listening to Jazz. The superblockbusters of Spielberg and Lucas in the 70's and 80's were great and that is when I was Hooked. We had big grand themes that stuck in our minds. Back to the future, Predator, Indiana, Rambo.... You know what I mean. In the 00's we had The Lord of the rings.
But now although the marvel films are absolutelly super blockbusters except of the main avengers theme nothing else really sticks out. Is it possible that fewer film music fans are 'born' today than in the past.
Is the Dune score a score for a blockbuster that can get someone really interested in film music?
In my opinion. NO.
Thoughts?

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2021 - 10:59 AM   
 By:   jackDAWG   (Member)

I don't know, really. I mean, how popular are filmscores nowadays anyway, as compared to, say the halcyon days of Jaws, Star Wars, etc.?

I think that filmscores that have been or will be major hits will likely accompany films that are also big hits, as far as fans noticing them.

On a personal level, a film that is particularly memorable for its score is usually what peaks one's interest in the first place. If you saw Jaws in its initial run (1975), you couldn't help but be impacted by the film and the score. They typically are part of the whole, aren't they? A filmscore that is, if you will, "hummable" will tend to be one that will start the otherwise uninterested to start listening.

So, if a new film comes along and it and its accompanying score connect bigly with audiences, then yes, it might start a new generation of filmscore fans.

Thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2021 - 12:15 PM   
 By:   Dylan   (Member)

I have met so few film music fans in my life (I'm 35) that I'm not sure. For the most part, my impression is that most younger people - if they're drawn to film music at all - go for music that emphasizes on ambience. And it seems like fans of Ambient film music are more likely to get into bands like Explosions in the Sky than to explore other kinds of film music.

I don't know if there is any composer around today who inspires their listeners to delve deep into our great film music heritage in the same way that early Danny Elfman inspired me to do so. There have been recent scores that inspired some people's interest in minimalism (Max Richter) or 1980s synth ("It Follows," "Stranger Things"), but to my knowledge that's kind of it. So I really don't know how people get into film music anymore. But let's not forget that even when film music was at its absolute peak (which for me was from the 1930s through the early '90s) there were very few real fans of it. Now there are even fewer.

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2021 - 12:24 PM   
 By:   Viscount Mark R. Y.   (Member)

I think a lot of it has to do with connecting strongly with a particular movie itself. Let's say you're a teen and you really got heavily into Tenet or Joker, to cite two examples. You love these films so much that their respective scores find favor with you by association. You put their tracks on your playlist and maybe they'll be your gateway into more film music, both new stuff and older.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2021 - 1:19 AM   
 By:   keky   (Member)

I think there are less and less "event movies", movies we come back to many times. It's partly due to streaming (in streaming there is no such movie that can be called an event movie because new movies are coming constantly), partly because of the sheer amount of movies that can be watched today.

The most iconic soundtracks always belonged to these special "big" movies, movies I call "event movies". Or movies that became cult movies. (I haven't met a cult movie that became a cult movie after debuting in streaming...) In connection with the above there are less and less scores we return to frequently because there are so many new score of new movies coming out - sadly, most of the times only as downloads - every week.

In my teen years and my twenties I watched maybe 20-40 movies a year. Of course the music of many of them became favourites I kept returning to. Nowadays I watch probably 200 movies a year - there is simply no time for any of them and their scores to become such huge favourites like the ones decades ago.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2021 - 2:15 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Born in 1977 (and as such technically part of the generation of fans that came into film music through STAR WARS), my own discovery of film music really came around 1990 and the early nineties, with scores such as TWIN PEAKS, JURASSIC PARK and THE ABYSS as the three early cornerstones. But just a few years later, when my own film music fandom was firmly cemented, I noticed another score that seemed to recruit new film music fans left and right -- the "new" STAR WARS, in a way. That score was THE ROCK. Friends of mine who had no interest in film music fawned over that (as did I, of course, even though I was already a fan). Much like AMELIE and other scores of that period, it became a big crossover success. Of course, Zimmer continued to recruit new fans with GLADIATOR, the PIRATES movies etc. in the years that came, and continues to this day.

In fact, whenever I meet young people and kids these days (when I do lectures on film and film music, for example), Zimmer is THE go-to guy, but now it isn't so much THE ROCK and that kind of stuff (that's OLD!), but rather INCEPTION, INTERSTELLAR etc. Other names on their radar include Ramin Djawadi, Angelo Badalamenti (the Lynch coolness factor lives on, even though the composer himself is far too old for them), Cliff Martinez, Harry Gregson-Williams....and if they have a little bit of "cineaste" gene in them, names such as Daniel Lopatin, Nicholas Brittell, Mica Levi, Johann Johannsson, Hildur Gudnadottir, Johnny Jewel.

Morricone, Williams, Glass, Shore and Horner (somewhat) are also on their radar among the "old ones". Sorry, Goldsmith fans, I've not yet encounted a kid who brings up that name. Silvestri has had a little bit of "new spring" with the AVENGERS music, but he's by no means a household name among this crowd.

As for recent, individual non-Zimmer film scores being brought up by these kids, that varies considerably. THE SOCIAL NETWORK and TRON: LEGACY were big ones, but that's already 10 years ago.

As always, one needs a little bit of time to properly assess what registers as major discoveries and favourites among the younger generation. It's not easy to assess WHILE it's happening.

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2021 - 7:23 AM   
 By:   acathla   (Member)

In my "group" of people that I know its usually always Zimmer. I had no trouble finding friends to buy tickets to Zimmer's shows in Norway. Whenever I mention I listen to score a lot to new people (when they ask me what type of music I like) most people gush out how amazing "Time" from INCEPTION is. The same goes for INTERSTELLAR. Even at some parties with the "guys" they often like to play the PIRATES theme while drunk, lol!

Also, the PLANET EARTH score has been mentioned a couple of times.

These film are not new anymore though. I think the "newest" score/theme I have heard people mentioning is the Wonder Woman theme and the Superman theme (aka Man of Steel).

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2021 - 6:30 AM   
 By:   kingtolkien   (Member)

I understand what you are all saying but I think that the quality of film music is not what it used to be. More sound design than music in many cases.

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2021 - 8:04 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

I agree with all of you pointing out the strong connection to a movie that has young people excited.

And even if it is hard for some to believe - I heard teenagers coming out of "No Time To Die", eager to download the soundtrack by this guy, Hans Zimmer... he did the "Pirates" movies their parents like to watch, right?

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2021 - 8:14 AM   
 By:   King Solium   (Member)

I am a bit sceptical whether there are film scores written these days that can get someone to start listening and collecting film scores in general from the past up to now.


Film scores nowadays (to a large extent) are as disposable as the films they accompany. Its something you digest in the moment then move on with your life until the next thing comes along.

I think it helps if you grew up in a family environment where classical scoring and orchestral music were played in your life. Kids nowadays have parents who grew up on Rap and auto tune pop stars. They've had no exposure or appreciation for film music.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2021 - 8:38 AM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

"I think it helps if you grew up in a family environment where classical scoring and orchestral music were played in your life.
Kids nowadays have parents who grew up on Rap and auto tune pop stars. They've had no exposure or appreciation for film music."
King Solium , nobody could have said it any better. You have nailed it perfectly.

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2021 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   King Solium   (Member)

"I think it helps if you grew up in a family environment where classical scoring and orchestral music were played in your life.
Kids nowadays have parents who grew up on Rap and auto tune pop stars. They've had no exposure or appreciation for film music."
King Solium , nobody could have said it any better. You have nailed it perfectly.


Thxs!

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2021 - 1:28 PM   
 By:   kingtolkien   (Member)

King Solium I totally agree with you

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2021 - 5:22 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

The diagnosis is in . The cure is in what children are exposed to as they grow. If they are exposed to classical music and orchestral scores ,we may eventually return to a new appreciation of the golden age and have a "neo-golden age".

 
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