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 Posted:   Oct 24, 2021 - 10:23 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

I viewed the film on Blu-ray (for the second time), last night. I greatly admire all the technical and artistic contributions that are clearly evident on the screen. In particular the sound and sound effects, John Williams score, (I love 'Snowy's Theme'), and the motion capture techniques from real actors to their animated versions. The first 1/4 of the film is splendidly told, then it becomes so incredibly frenetic, (particularly the flash-back Pirate scenes), that I just become totally exhausted by it all. I wish I had seen this film when it came out with a live audience, but I did not. I'd have loved to have witnessed how the youngsters in the audience reacted to the film. I've a theory that they didn't care about the, (for me), confusing, rapidly-cut scenes going back and forth in time of those Pirate battles? I wonder if Spielberg wanted certain things in the story, and Producer Peter Jackson wanted certain things in the story and that in the end, their were 'too many cooks'? When 3 names are listed for the screenplay (from a comic book), that was a 'red flag' in my head. The film ends with a 'non-ending', in anticipation of a sequel or two. But after all these years, I don't think it's forthcoming.

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2021 - 1:36 PM   
 By:   Viscount Bark R. Y.   (Member)

Tintin, not Tin-Tin. I'll be having to correct people on that for eternity! lol

Personally, I would rather have had a live-action and wittier film than what Spielberg delivered ten years ago.

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2021 - 5:58 PM   
 By:   Santa Adam   (Member)

Perhaps the film's title worked against it. Many hear TinTin and think about a German Shepherd dog.

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2021 - 6:06 PM   
 By:   Viscount Bark R. Y.   (Member)

Perhaps the film's title worked against it. Many hear TinTin and think about a German Shepherd dog.

Tintin, dang it!!

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2021 - 6:30 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Maybe the score didn't have enough "BRAAAHMMM".


Or maybe not enough Tintin...

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2021 - 7:02 PM   
 By:   Santa Adam   (Member)

Perhaps the film's title worked against it. Many hear TinTin and think about a German Shepherd dog.

Tintin, dang it!!


I'll bet you say tin foil instead of aluminum foil!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2021 - 7:44 PM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

I really like the film, and I have no problems at all with the edits, I think it is quite successful.

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2021 - 8:11 PM   
 By:   King Solium   (Member)

I really like the film, and I have no problems at all with the edits, I think it is quite successful.

I thoroughly enjoyed the film. I was pleasantly surprised how entertaining it was.

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2021 - 3:41 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

I love the original Tintin comics by Hergé, which I have just about all read (except for one, which ironically is one of the few I have in my shelf now) at various points in my life. I love the comics and I remember I saw the Spielberg version on the big screen. I enjoyed it a lot, it was sure a good looking film, and I sure am not really interested in a live action Tintin, as I don't think Tintin is a particularly "realistic" character, but one that works better in its original cartoon form. It's a pity though that no sequel was ever made. Would have loved to see the story "finished".

I guess the various screenwriters for the film stem from the fact that, while the movie on the one hand stayed true to its source material, on the other it also widely changed it and incorporated elements from three different Tintin books. I think one of the main "problems" with Tintin is that it is a comic book character.

The Tintin stories are both real adventure stories as well as well as humorous cartoons, and there is a fine balance there which makes the comic books very immersive. But it's difficult to nail that in a movie. If you make it too realistic and emphasize the adventure aspect, you loose the humor and the "comic book style", if you are going too far in the other direction, you loose some of the sense of awe and mystery. I will have to rewatch Tintin again some time to see how I really feel about the movie.

Interesting side fact: Philippe de Broca's OUR MAN IN RIO (a movie I have loved since childhood, and just re-watched a few weeks ago... still holds up wonderfully) was actually inspired by the Tintin comics as both the director and the star, Jean Paul Belmondo, were big Tintin fans, and the movie really "feels" like a live action Tintin probably more than a real live action Tintin probably could. OUR MAN IN RIO again was one of the inspirations for RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK. Thus the circle is now complete. :-)

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2021 - 4:32 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

I admired it on a technical level, but it had no heart, or warmth.
It was a cold fish.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2021 - 7:04 AM   
 By:   ROBERT Z   (Member)

Yes this Tintin is more Indiana Jones than Hergé's young Belgium reporter. Mille sabords!

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2021 - 7:10 AM   
 By:   King Solium   (Member)

Yes this Tintin is more Indiana Jones than Hergé's young Belgium reporter. Mille sabords!

I'm not familiar with the source material and I liked it precisely because it was like a good Indiana Jones movie.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2021 - 7:26 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

Perhaps the film's title worked against it. Many hear TinTin and think about a German Shepherd dog.

Tintin, dang it!!


I'll bet you say tin foil instead of aluminum foil!


AluminIum foil, dammit !!!!!

D.S.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2021 - 7:33 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

Tintin was THE signpost for "ligne claire", a style of drawing created and pioneered by Hergé. The film's makers stepped away from that by turning a 2D character into a 3D and I don't mean the stereoscopic 3D but the light and shade kind that can also be done in 2D. Live action makes that 3D inevitable but the computer does not. They should have stuck to the 2D representation. It's the same way that comics nowadays are "colourised into 3D" with all those highlights and shades, resulting in that godawful kitsch look.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2021 - 7:40 AM   
 By:   King Solium   (Member)

Tintin was THE signpost for "ligne claire", a style of drawing created and pioneered by Hergé. The film's makers stepped away from that by turning a 2D character into a 3D and I don't mean the stereoscopic 3D but the light and shade kind that can also be done in 2D. Live action makes that 3D inevitable but the computer does not. They should have stuck to the 2D representation. It's the same way that comics nowadays are "colourised into 3D" with all those highlights and shades, resulting in that godawful kitsch look.

D.S.


I agree comic books today with the color shading looks like crap. Worse yet they're stuck in the 90's when it comes to computerized coloring. I don't even like the slick paper they use nowadays. I love the look and feel of newsprint.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2021 - 10:50 AM   
 By:   TheAvenger   (Member)

Much to my surprise I really enjoyed Tin-Tin. I wasn’t ever a fan of the books (read a few as a kid but they didn’t impact on me) but I thought the movie was inventive and fun (and the first John Williams score I’ve really loved in years).

To be honest though I’m glad we never got a sequel, simply because it was due to be directed by Peter Jackson, a film maker who I think always makes bloated, over long films where nobody ever seems to tell him “enough already”. His remake of along for example is half a good movie padded with half a dull movie.

 
 Posted:   Oct 26, 2021 - 2:29 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

Tintin was THE signpost for "ligne claire", a style of drawing created and pioneered by Hergé. The film's makers stepped away from that by turning a 2D character into a 3D and I don't mean the stereoscopic 3D but the light and shade kind that can also be done in 2D. Live action makes that 3D inevitable but the computer does not. They should have stuck to the 2D representation. It's the same way that comics nowadays are "colourised into 3D" with all those highlights and shades, resulting in that godawful kitsch look.

D.S.


Yes, the super-realistic cartoon 3D looks was problematic for me as well, as the "ligne claire" drawing style of the comics is such an essential part of the Tintin comics. I love the original Hergé drawn Tintin comics, it's true comic book art.
Still, they transferred the "ligne claire" to a somewhat surreal 3D world, Hergé's 2D flat colored images became semi-realistic 3D images. But they preserved many of the characters features and looks, so I enjoyed that. But of course, the original Hergé Tintin drawings are both classic and iconic.

 
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