Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Jan 18, 2022 - 3:02 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

Heard this on Classic FM for the first time ever...



...and thought 'Ahhhhh, MASADA' wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 19, 2022 - 6:45 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

Either I'm the last person around here to notice this (above), or we don't like to talk about it - when it's JG - at Goldsmith Score Monthly wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 19, 2022 - 7:03 AM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

got mine today, own all previous versions of this magnificant work

but am i missing something ?
nothing in the new booklet mentioned about cd 4 except one sentence about "the slaves" track and the cue info on the backcover?
thought this album was a rerecording or only "The slaves" track ?
no mention about where recorded/track info technical details



If I recall correctly, there were no notes or track details in the Varese release of the album either.
The album was recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London, in 1981.



The MCA album was also weird in that it had no conducting credit. The back of the sleeve says "Music Composed, Produced and Arranged by Jerry Goldsmith". No mention of a conductor.

https://img.cdandlp.com/2017/02/imgL/118551100-2.jpg

Apart from the conductor non-credit, the "arranger" credit was also unusual, since Goldsmith never took an arranger credit on any of his other work. My guess it he did the album arrangements on his own, sans Arthur Morton's secretarial assistance.

The other thing I've always found curious is that the Masada album was recorded in London by Eric Tomlinson, but edited in Rome by Federico Savina. Why go all the way to Rome to edit an album?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 19, 2022 - 7:11 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

Could Goldsmith have been working on another film at that time (THE SALAMANDER?) and finished up the MASADA album while there? Just a guess.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 19, 2022 - 7:13 AM   
 By:   HAL 2000   (Member)

Either I'm the last person around here to notice this (above), or we don't like to talk about stuff like this - when it's JG - at Goldsmith Score Monthly wink

What are you expecting? There is definite similarity but nothing I'd call an absolute lift as the total piece really goes somewhere different than what Goldsmith wrote. Things like this can be heard all over filmusic. Heck, in music in general. The first 4 or 5 notes from the Star Wars theme are pretty much the same as the first notes of Rozsa's King's Row main title. Kind of a big "so what?" if you ask me. There are probably several mannerisms and characteristics in Jewish music that Goldsmith incorporated into Masada. Are you expecting us to all jump on this for some reason?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 19, 2022 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

I guess you don't visit many Horner threads.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 19, 2022 - 7:30 AM   
 By:   HAL 2000   (Member)

I guess you don't visit many Horner threads.

Sure have. In his earlier years Horner was known, not for just replicating a few notes, but entire passages of music. A different beast. I myself was irritated by some of his "borrowings" but he seemed to grow out of that habit as he matured. I still dearly miss his presence on the film music scene.

 
 Posted:   Jan 19, 2022 - 7:39 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Either I'm the last person around here to notice this (above), or we don't like to talk about it - when it's JG - at Goldsmith Score Monthly wink

I’ve known the Bloch piece for longer than I’ve known Goldsmith’s Masada and I think it’s just a (first four Jewish-sounding notes) coincidence as happens in music sometimes. The full melodies are not the same, and even the moods are quite different (the Bloch is, well, prayerful sounding… whereas I don’t get that sense from the Goldsmith at all… for me the latter more communicates the inevitable trudge of history for the Jewish people or something).

Horner has carbon-copied whole sections/pieces of music at times, imitating the structure, mood and everything (I’m thinking of Troy as the worst offender for my taste here, with its absolutely shameless Britten and Shostakovich rips). And sure his frequent danger motif was just four notes in common with Rachmaninov’s first symphony… but those four notes constitute the *whole* of Horner’s motif AND Rachmaninov’s motif…and *everything* — the tempo, instrumentation, and mood — is copied pretty much identically.

Yavar

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2022 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved...